Vintage Riding & Equestrian Apparel

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by Evan Everhart, May 4, 2009.

  1. Lone_Ranger

    Lone_Ranger Practically Family

    Messages:
    500
    Location:
    Central, PA

    The light bulb went off!

    Dressing for the Hunt.
    http://www.horsegirltv.com/blog/?p=514
    Why do fox hunters wear a stock tie? Why those brick colored breeches in Virginia?

    When you understand the history behind it, it's not snobbish. There is a practical aspect to it.
     
  2. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    Lone_Ranger, per your request. Enjoy!

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    As for comfort, I have ridden in McClellans for the past 3 years and find them very comfortable. The longest ride so far was the Paul Revere Ride in Boston at 16 miles as well as many rides of 10 to 12 miles as part of training. If you will be looking for a McClellan, you're going to be in the low range of about $650 US to in the $1500-$1800 for one in the above condition. I have four McClellans in my collection and would be willing to discuss options if you are indeed interested. Best. DW
     
  3. alden405

    alden405 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I have never ridden in a 1904 Mac,but have ridden a 28 over some distance (5 days in Texas winter about 2002)
    i used narrow tread stirrups without hoods,nice and light but did leave my bug feet out in the snow
    i rode with a packed saddle,pommle,cantel and saddlebags with 2 waterbottles plus a camelbak style watercarrier from Platatac in Melbourne
     
  4. Evan Everhart

    Evan Everhart A-List Customer

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    Hollywood, California
    McClellan Saddles

    Specifications for each saddle are on the respective sites.

    http://www.scruggsfarm.com/productinfo.aspx?productid=RK1
    Available in black and dark brown.
    @ $284.99 (this model has a fiber-glass tree)

    http://www.statelinetack.com/item/m...-7D81-DE11-9973-0019B9C2BEFD&mr:referralID=NA
    Available in light chocolate.
    @ $399.99

    http://www.ushist.com/saddles-tack.htm
    M1859 McClellans from $850. U.S. Black (enlisted), U.S. Black (officers +$545.), C.S. Russet (+$545.); Fully customizable. surcingle purchasable ($70.), seat size customizable, girth and coat straps included, etc.

    M1872 McClellans from $995. Black; Fully customizable. surcingle purchasable ($65.), seat size customizable, girth and coat straps included, etc.

    M1874 McClellans from $995. Black;Fully customizable. surcingle purchasable ($65.), seat size customizable, girth and coat straps included, etc.

    M1885 McClellans from $995. Black;Fully customizable. surcingle purchasable ($65.), seat size customizable, girth and coat straps included, etc.

    M1904 McClellans from $995. Russet;Fully customizable. surcingle purchasable ($65.), seat size customizable, girth and coat straps included, etc. (The 1904 is GORGEOUS!) All of these saddles are made to order and while they are a bit more expensive, they are really nice and perfect reproductions of the originals. The saddles from US.Hist.com, have many other customizable options such as quarter-horse bars and etc. They cost a bit, but they're really rather nice.
     
  5. Evan Everhart

    Evan Everhart A-List Customer

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    Hollywood, California
    Those are Superbly Beautiful pictures of a Superbly Beautiful saddle there, Sir! Spot on! I've actually been considering a Chocolate coloured McClellan from this one site for some time! I didn't think anyone else gave them any thought! Marvelous! I was a bit slow on the response with those links, sorry for that! Well, till next time!

    -Sincerely Yrs,

    E!
     
  6. Lone_Ranger

    Lone_Ranger Practically Family

    Messages:
    500
    Location:
    Central, PA
    Nice looking Macs, Draws!

    The people that own the farm where I ride, have an old Mac. But, it isn't in any condition to ride.

    I wonder if I could find one to fit a Warmblood. Unless I were to get a "replica" made. Wasn't the Mac tree designed to fit a Morgan sized horse? I know the Army Caisson unit has them on draft horses, but it think they are modern recreations, and not 'surplus' saddles.
     
  7. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    As for the old Mac the farm has, the key is to look closely at the saddle they do have. If the tree is in good condition (i.e. all upper straps, buckles and stitching are solid) then you have the makings for a very nice rebuild . All that is needed is to buy new lower sraps and stirrups and you're all set for a complete Mac Kit. Complete lower strap kits can be obtained for about a total of $250. If the saddle (tree) is in great condition, you should be able to get it for about $125 give or take. Perhaps $400-$500 for a very nice complete rebuild.

    A bit of clarification I should also provide. The four photos are just different angles to the same saddle. I have four of the 1904s in my posession. This is the best preserved of all four and completely original (The canteen is original but only added for the display).

    Yes, a warmblood or even quarter horse would be the appropriate horse these saddles would have fitted but we are using the 04 McClellan on all of our horses regardless of size. We have throroughbreds, Quarter Horses, Appaloosa's, Arabian, and Percherons. The only difficulty presented are the varying girth sizes of each breed. The shown horsehair girth strap would be suitable for horses up to 16-16.5 hands. Anything larger, we must go to a larger girth strap by using the western style girth strap with single buckle ends.

    I have 4 original McClellans in my cav collection. The shown saddle is for display only while the remaining three are used for parade and other functions.

    Evan has listed a number of vendors of McClellan look-alikes/reproductions. The prices are quite reasonable and simply do not match up to the Mac in quality, seat fit or ride. I have ridden for over 40 years and can attest to that. If anyone is looking for an original Mac, you should concentrate on the following:

    1. Most originals are found with fairly good trees but care must be taken to look for durability of the upper quarter straps and integrity of the stitching around the tree, pommel and cantel.
    2. Lower quarter straps are almost always in poor condition unless they have been rebuilt.
    3. Never use original cincha straps or original girth straps. The metal rings deteriorate with age will will most assuredly snap or break at a very inopportune time.

    In essence, the tree is the key. All other straps should always be suspect unless you are purchasing a completely rebuild Mac. My experience finds that completely rebuilt original Macs will start at about $695 and go up from there if you're looking for completely originals as the one I have displayed.

    You may want to look at the following site for some additional information.
    http://www.borderstates.com/
     
  8. Evan Everhart

    Evan Everhart A-List Customer

    Messages:
    457
    Location:
    Hollywood, California
    Quick Question!

    I was wondering, in English riding, which style of head-wear do all of you prefer, for personal use or even just for the look of it?

    The velvet covered helmet?

    The bowler or coke or derby style hat?

    The plain old peaked sporting cap ("news-boy" cap)?

    Or, for those of you who ride Dressage, the top-hat?

    If the top-hat, a felt, a silk, or a beaver?

    I was also wondering for those of you who Western style, which style of head-wear do you prefer? I have seen an awful lot of different styles in this category and do not know all of the names for them....I only know of gaucho hats, ten-gallons, and those two styles of hats which look like extremely wide-brimmed provincial homburg hats but with different details as to the styling i.e. no silk taping on the brim edge and likely, no silk hat-band etc. Anyhow, inform me!

    Let's both schools of us talk about hats here and post some pictures in your respective head-gear or head-gear preferences in your postings, aye?! Onward to equestrian hats!
     
  9. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    My preference is based on experiences learned over the past 40+ years through trial and tribulation.

    First of all, it's always going to be the felt helmet with as ample protection for the skull as I can affort. This would be for general purpose riding, trail riding, etc. with no exceptions.

    Second, the only other riding hat I would wear would be the Polish Czapka only because it is required by my unit and it does provide some protection in that it is hard and has a fairly firm chin strap, albeit a bit top heavy.

    Lastly, we do wear a blue campaign hat as prescribed for special parades and events. However, it is not a hat that I'm at all comfortable with in that it provides absolutely no protection especially when in a parade situation with balloons, clowns, children throwing firecrackers, etc. I've already seen several bad incidents. I will, more often than not, refuse to ride if the campaign is required, if I have a choice. Under special circumstances and when we have minimal riders, I will wear it but find that I must be prepared at the highest mental level for any eventuality.

    My personal opinion is, if you are going to ride for looks only (i.e. without protective head cover), I would not recommended riding at all because you will eventually get thrown or even worse thrown into something hard. Not advisable from my perspective. Just my two cents worth.
     
  10. alden405

    alden405 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Melbourne
    [​IMG]

    silly velvet covered helmet for me,i try and "butch" it up with some tough boots

    My missus says its all for nothing and i look as tough as a beret full of butterflys
     
  11. Prof. Steampunk

    Prof. Steampunk New in Town

    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Central Texas
    Comfortable Macs

    I have done all types of riding, from western to English, roping to broncs, and I constantly ran across people who thought they were uncomfortable, but I have found they are the most comfortable saddles I have ever ridden.

    I rode one with a cavalry re-enactment group and, unless roping, would prefer it to any other saddle, especially for training, endurance, or any practical riding. These things were designed to be ridden long distance and for the cavalryman to be able to move in EVERY direction while mounted. Others are made to stay in (bronc saddles), get out off (roping), etc. The Mac is, in my opinion, the best for all around use outside of roping or similar pursuits.

    Had a friend that used one for polocrosse and loved it. THAT's as close to mounted combat as I can imagine.

    One thing to get used to, especially for western riders, is that the rider is directly above the stirrups, so you don't sit quite the same way as a western saddle--except OLD-TIME saddles (1870s-90s). Look at REAL old saddles from cowboy days--seat was flat, high cantle, rider above the stirrups not behind. Starting in the 20s or 30s, matched ropings made getting out of the saddle faster an advantage. Since that time, most western saddles have a raised front. Many folks don't even know why. Except cutting saddles--flatter seats. HMMM, cutting horse riders have to stay mounted despite whatever the horse does.

    Main point = old timey cowboy saddles (made for men in the saddle 16 + hours a day) and Macs (ditto) had flat seats that put the rider on his thighs, not his butt. Were much more comfortable.
     
  12. Highlander

    Highlander A-List Customer

    Messages:
    473
    Location:
    Missouri
    I like those old MacClellands. Never ridden on one, but would like to one day.
     
  13. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    Last Fall

    This is what I would usually wear when riding for fun with other members of the troop. A variety of outfits can be worn based on personal preference. For this ride, I chose a pair of vintage green whipcord breeches with grey suede knee rolls and black field boots. My horse is a 15 hand Arabian by the name of Amigo.
    [​IMG]
     
  14. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
  15. alden405

    alden405 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Melbourne
    did these Breeches go on ebay?

    sam
     
  16. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    Yes, It is amazing just how many pair of breeches are available on eBay and elsewhere. There are a number of bidding/auction sites and a few online repro retailers.
     
  17. alden405

    alden405 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    361
    Location:
    Melbourne
  18. draws

    draws Practically Family

    Messages:
    548
    Location:
    Merrimack, NH
    I had researched this site in the past and have a few observations. As you may know, there is a substantial difference between the Jodhpurs that Monarch sells and breeches. If you don't mind the longer length with the cuffs, then Jodhpurs would be ok. The only problem is that they are not really that comfortable with the tall riding boot but are more suibtable if worn with Jodhpur boots.

    If you look at the photo presented, you'll notice that they are quite loose fitting below the knee and are quite long. A proper fit for jodhpurs would be to be fairly snug at and below the knees down to just below the calf where they would be a bit more loose. That being said, you should be fairly certain that your measurements are quite exacting since any deviation in measurement (too loose or too tight) will result in improper fit. Proper Jodhpurs should fit snug from the knee down.

    Another thing I had noted about the breeches/jodhpurs coming out of the far east is that they tend to cut them real low in the waist. It must have something to do with the smaller sizes from the waist down and through the crotch then up to the top rear. From first hand experience, it is important to provide them with correct rise measurements from the top front down through and up to the top rear. They do tend to skimp on this measurement and you might not be entirely happy if there wasn't enough room for the seat when sitting.

    I hope this makes sense. You might also want to look into Argentina Polo as well since they have a fairly nice example of the US and UK military cut breeches. They are about the same price and their khaki material is quite nice. The same rules should be followed with regard to measurements here as well, regardless. Best of luck.
     
  19. GWD

    GWD One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,642
    Location:
    Evergreen, Co
    I guess I'm pretty casual when it comes to my riding apparel. t-shirt, sneakers, and blue jeans.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This is my Dad's summer place in Wyoming. I just take the family out for about an hour or two at a time. I guess if we went for a day trip I'd dress more appropriately.
     

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