What Was The Last Movie You Watched?

Discussion in 'The Moving Picture' started by Amy Jeanne, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Without a doubt, LLL sits alongside Solo and The Lion King as one of the worst films I've ever spent money to sit through in a cinema. It started off okay.... but then they almost seemed to lose interest in making a musical, and begrudgingly just shoved in a few mored variations on the same tedious number over and over. For two leads who are both competent actors and singers, it was a shame that nobody thought to put them usical numbers within their comfortable range, rather than always seeming to be half a key out of it. Also a shame that neither of them were able to coem close to replicating the dance sequences the film was trying to reference. I came out if it feeling like I'd have been less annoyed if it had been some lesser-known Woody Allen picture I'd whiled away a couple of hours to on a plane, or some other second-rate fare - in the musical genre, Greatest Showman seems a fair comparison. It too did inexplicably well.

    Saw it earlier in the week. I went in with low expectations as a lot of people I know who have poor taste (the sort of people woh hated TLJ for making Luke Skywalker interesting for the first time, and who liked both Solo and the prequel trilogy) raved about it. I was entertained. Neither the worst film I've seen this year (hands down the Lion King, in which ironically every single CGI animal was bereft of a bumhole, given the end product stunk like it fell out of one), nor the best (Joker by a country mile), but perfectly entertaining, and I'll watch it again if I chance across it on TV some time, or it's on in a hotel or something. Rey's ultimate revelation was a little disappointing (I hate the whole tying everying into bloodlines) BUT it could have been so much worse. Not that big a deal. There were oodles of fan-service but for me done in a way which enhanced, not ruined, it. Nice to see the Sith had the sense to build a small companion droid that could converse in English instead of making the owner learn a series of bleeps and bloops... The Dead Character's cameo was a pleasant surprise, and a very decent performance, not least after his phoned-in, "will this do?" non-effort in TFA. The footage of Carrie Fisher was well used. I liked what they did with Ben/Kylo. In fact, the only sour note for me was the rather brutal brushing aside of Rose, by far a more interesting new character than any of the three crying and hugging at the end (especially Rey, very much the Luke Skywalker of this piece). Rose deserved at least a 'reunion moment' if nothing else.

    I find it interesting to note that sicne taking over the franchise, The Mouse has made five films in total - one perfectly acceptable (TFA), two very good (TLJ / RoS), one probably the best film in the franchise (Rogue One), and one singular stinker every bit as bad as 'Episode I' (Solo. Obvs.). That's an 80% hit rate, compared to Lucas, who in his six managed a hit rate of probably 40% (the first three, in release order - with penalty points for the retrograde changes and petulent refusal to make the un-messed versions readily available).
     
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  2. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Edward, you make some damn fine points in that last post. Solid critical insights.
     
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  3. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

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    "Joker" - Puddin' and I rented this the other night. A disturbing film that left us well.... disturbed. Puddin' who has a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy works as a psych O.T. at the local "ahem" mental hospital (don't get me started) so this film was right in her wheel house. From time to time she would have me pause the film and tell me how correct or in-correct Jaquin Pheonix's portrayal of a clearly mentally ill man was. Some of her commentary was chilling. As a casual observer of all things "Batman" I loved how it flipped some aspects of the his origin story on its ear. Thomas Wayne (in this universe at least) is NOT some benevolent "Daddy Warbucks" with hair but an all to familiar crumb with wealth and power who feels compelled to help us vermin out so he can walk to the opera unmolested. A man who's past might not have been so squeeky clean as it's always been depicted. The film also tackles that thorny question of mass shootings and violence and it's relationship to mental health (or lack thereof). Would the Joker had gone on his spree had the mental health services he was receiving NOT been a victim of budget cuts?

    Also the depiction of "Gotham City" in the late 70's early 80's was so close to the then existing "post apocalyptic" landscape of NY City I started having flashbacks. Man I could smell the garbage, taste the subway cars and see the graffiti that stained every single inch of the place! I can see why many consider it the best film of the year.. Pheonix's performance is certainly the best one I saw last year. You should check it out before the Oscars hit. Good movie despite the hate given by critics who seem to universally despise anything with a whiff of comic books associated with it.

    Worf
     
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  4. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

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    Werner Beinhart! (1990) on VHS. :D
     
  5. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    I actually considered going to the theatre to see this as I read so many positive reviews, esp in the conservative press. It mentioned, aside from the whole 'comic book' aspect that it did show the descent into madness in somewhat realistic manner. It is now rentable so this weekend will give it a look. Oh, and I, a working class stiff too desire to walk to the opera unmolested.
     
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  6. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    "Red Joan", a Judy Dench piece that was very entertaining....loosely based on real events. It was a good piece of movie craft even though the ending was a loooong stretch to justifying her actions. I disagreed but enjoyed the movie nonetheless.
     
  7. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    "Victoria and Albert". A very sweet, touching movie filled with Brit actors I have seen in multiple features over the years. Don't know their names (except for Mark Strong, 3rd pic this week with him in it) but when I see them on the screen holler out....."there he/she is again." Nothing ground breaking just a heartfelt look at an intriguing historical figure.
     
  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    MV5BNzQyMDUwYzktOWFmMC00ZmVmLWFlMGMtYjM5OTZlMzZhYzUwXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyMjIyNjE2NA@@._V1_.jpg
    Cash on Demand from 1962 with Peter Cushing, Andre' Morell and Richard Vernon

    I've been watching old movies since I was a kid in the '70s and am always amazed that, almost every year, one or two little gems that I've never seen nor heard about pop up - Cash on Demand is one of those little gems. And it's even got a wonderful echo of A Christmas Carol without any mawkishness.

    Post-war British cinema didn't have the money of Hollywood to put on spectacles - lavish productions with large casts, impressive action scenes, incredible location shots, etc. - so instead, and to our benefit, it mastered "small" stories, on small sets all done in crips black and white with outstanding actors working, probably, for a fraction of a Hollywood payday.

    Cash on Demand has all these things. Set in a small-town bank branch at Christmas, a scrooge-like branch manager (Cushing) meanly and condescendingly - but without bombast - terrorizes his small staff as they try to generate some Christmas cheer with a planed party, which he'll neither attend nor contribute to, and general feelings of holiday bonhomie that he negates with a punctilious enforcement of protocol. But he saves his greatest venom for his head cashier (Vernon), whom he sadistically threatens with dismissal for small derelictions (which would end the cashier's career and his ability to support his family in that era).

    With that Scrooge-Cratchet dynamic in place, in walks the bank's insurance company inspector (Morell) who (minor spoiler alert as it comes up quickly and is in the TCM guide snippet) is really a bank robber cum Ghost of Christmas Present who will bat Cushing's conscience around as he unfurls his heist plans.

    What follows is a tense, filmed-in-real-time, psychological thriller as Morell threatens Cushing's never seen, but heard over the telephone, wife and child with torture if Cushing doesn't aid him in his robbery. From here, it's all locked and unlocked inner and outer doors, false presentations of normalcy to the staff - punctuated by just-missed exposures of the crime - as Cushing suffers inside while Morell shows Cushing his failings as a human as the cheery crook nearly comes off as the better person by comparison.

    Good throughout, the payoff - the moment when the tortured head cashier and bank staff have to decide to take revenge or pity on their tormenting manager - adds a moral dilemma to the basic A Christmas Carol story that succeeds in an eminently understated British way that leaves you wishing there was more.

    I'm saving this one on my DVR as I'm looking forward to seeing it again soon where I know I'll pick up on many nuances missed on the first viewing. And I want to focus in on the details of the 1962 bank branch where mechanical perpetual calendars are updated daily before opening, milk-glass patricians abound and summer fans sit idle as snow falling can be seen through the large, wood-framed windows - all wonderful time travel to 1962. When several months go by and a little gem like Cash on Demand doesn't pop up, I always get a bit nervous that another one won't becoming, but somehow, one always does.
     
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  9. 3fingers

    3fingers One Too Many

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    Based on your review I watched Cash On Demand this evening. It's on YouTube if anyone is interested in catching it. Definitely worthwhile, and like you I will watch it again to see details I missed this time.
     
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  10. Edward Reed

    Edward Reed One of the Regulars

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    1917. cinematic brilliance! I've never seen anything quite like it. You can't take your eyes off the film at all. You are drawn in and held there till the very end. Amazingly well done!
    82201829_10220571040964044_1792433811334627328_n.jpg
     
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  11. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

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    We watched this one tonight as well and very much enjoyed it. We were surprised that neither of us had heard of it.
     
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  12. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    I'm so glad you enjoyed it. I think it will be even better the second time through.
     
  13. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    That's great - I'm really glad you guys liked it. I thought it was a little gem that, like you guys, I was surprised I'd never heard of.
     
  14. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Be interested to hear your good lady's final verdict. THere were some hatchett-job critical pieces in the UK pres that tried to claim it implied any and all of us who have suffered with mental ill-health are ticking timebombs of violence, but I didn't feel it was sensationalist in that way at all.

    I also loved the very different view of Thomas Wayne. In my mind, what we've seen in all other Batman related films was a version of TW that reflected Bruce Wayne's experience, and those close to him. It's entirely plausible - in fact, more believable than either version - that who he was to Bruce Wayne, Alfred Pennyworth, and Arthur Fleck varied per each's differing experience of him as a person. True to life.

    I'm intrigued by this. Here in the UK, it has long been WW2 that has captured the public imagination in fiction and cinema, I suppose in part, aside from having been more recent, WW2 is that much more easily reducible to good guys / bad guys. The trailer makes the story seem off to me - at the rate the meat-grinder of the trenches was turning over corpses, known to the Allied general at the time, it seems odd they'd suddenly care so much about a relatively small number of men. I assume there's more to it in context, obviously. I'm surprised this film has only happened now, in a way; the centeenary of the outbreak of the Great War was much marked here in the UK, then there were a few bits about the Somme in 2016, but after that the much-hyped jamboree of celebratory events just seemed to fizzle out without huge impact on cinema in particular.
     
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  15. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Does anyone know how Thomas Wayne was presented in the original Batman story - I guess in the first Batman comics to come out?

    It's all fiction, but I'm just wondering how Batman's creator saw Thomas Wayne / what backstory he originally created for him?

    Note, I haven't seen "Joker" yet, so I'm just responding to comments here.
     
  16. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

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    Re: Joker and mental illness. My wife who works in a State mental institution says that most of the "truly mentally ill" are more a threat to themselves than anyone else. True there have been incidents of patients assaulting staff (some quite violently) but those are few and far between. The vast majority of her patients are more likely to hurt themselves than anyone else. This may change though as more and more violent offenders are put in psyche hospitals once released from prison as, though they don't want them walking around loose, they can't legally keep them behind prison bars so now they're behind hospital bars. Forensics may be mentally ill as well but they've also been socialized by the prison system... NOT a good mix.

    As for Thomas Wayne... the question is.. is he Warren Buffet or Bill Gates or Trump and Bezos. The original canon in the comic books does not mention much as to Bruce Wayne's parents character one way or another. This may have changed over the last 70 years or so. I guess you'll just have to take your pic.

    Worf
     
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  17. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Yes - mental illness is not a very precise term, of course. In most cases anti-social behaviour comes about from a personalty disorder rather than from one of the more familiar psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Prisons are full of violent, often fixated people with personality disorders which are often the product of abuse experienced as children - attachment theory is the lens through which this is generally viewed. There are still huge gaps in our understanding of mental ill health. Movies tend to construct poetic or romantic accounts of mental ill health to help dramatise how society deals with outliers or difference.
     
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  18. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    SPOILER ALERT....


    RE Worf's comment above, it's certainly interesting that, for all the hype about violence, in Joker there are "only" six deaths. One, his mother - from illness. Two to four:the three thugs that attack Arthur on the subway (the first two of which could easily be considered self-defence, the third arguably within the margin of appreciation for same in pressured circumstances). Death number 5 is a protestor shot by police, not Arthur. The final death was meant to be Arthur's very public (televised) suicide, though instead it turns out to be the host, who goads Arthur into it largely.
     
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  19. Benny Holiday

    Benny Holiday My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    The Gentlemen. Found it very entertaining. Director Guy Ritchie returning to what he does best, some good old-fashioned dodgy characters involved in schemes and scams up to their armpits. Clever storyline, good humour and great characters made this an unexpected winner for me. Needs a VERY strong language warning though, if you're offended by the strongest cuss words in modern English, you'll be plenty affronted before you're halfway into this flick. Kudos to Hugh Grant and Charlie Hunnam, whose performances in The Gentlemen are top rate.
     
    Worf likes this.
  20. MissNathalieVintage

    MissNathalieVintage A-List Customer

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    I was looking forward to watching Spies in Disguise. It was a good cartoon I liked the story, only what disappointed me was the nudity in a kids film, take that out and it would've been ten times better.
     

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