What Was The Last Movie You Watched?

Discussion in 'The Moving Picture' started by Amy Jeanne, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. Rats Rateye

    Rats Rateye New in Town

    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Wisconsin (The Frozen Tundra)
    Looking forward to it. I just have to wait for my local library (Who would have known that libraries have good movies available?) to have it returned and delivered.
     
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  2. Spiney

    Spiney Familiar Face

    Messages:
    74
    Watched Reservoir Dogs last night, hadn’t seen it in probably 10 years. An epic but bizarre movie.
     
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  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    14,605
    Location:
    New York City
    It's a shame it fell apart in the second half, but still, I think you'll enjoy it. Looking forward to hearing your post-viewing thoughts.

    I need to see it again as, like you, it's been at least ten years.
     
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  4. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,253
    Location:
    Northern California
    Odds Against Tomorrow on TCM this morning. It is kind of playing in the background and stumbled in on it late, but I like what I have seen. Nice cast, and entertaining cinematography, and seems to be an interesting story. :D
     
  5. AmateisGal

    AmateisGal I'll Lock Up

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    5,936
    Location:
    Nebraska
    From 1943!
     
  6. crawlinkingsnake

    crawlinkingsnake A-List Customer

    Messages:
    374
    Location:
    West Virginia
    I also saw it this morning and loved it. TCM's "Noir Alley" with Eddie Muller (https://noiralley.tcm.com/about-eddie) airs every Saturday midnight and Sunday 10:00am. Since I'm usually not awake by midnight (unless out galavanting around), I do occasionaly catch it Sunday mornings. Eddie Muller is the best!
     
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  7. crawlinkingsnake

    crawlinkingsnake A-List Customer

    Messages:
    374
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Recently on NETFLIX watched "Mudbound" (https://www.netflix.com/title/80175694). Story of two families, one white, one black, from the Mississippi Delta post 1927 flood, through post WW II. Both families had sons who served during the war. Goes into detail on how both veterans were treated after their return to civilian life in Mississippi. It was interesting for a while but became quite depressing.
     
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  8. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    With not much worth watching on TV last night my wife and I resorted to Netflix and chose Cool Hand Luke (1967). She had never seen it, and it had been several years since I watched it last. Good movie (well, I like it) with solid performances throughout. It was the first time I'd seen it without having been "edited for television", and was a little surprised by how tame it is by modern standards.
     
  9. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,817
    Location:
    Troy, New York, USA
    Where is the REAL ToE and what have you done with the body!??!!! Compliments???? Who ARE you????

    Worf
     
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  10. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    14,605
    Location:
    New York City
    unnamed-23.jpg
    The Killer that Stalked New York from 1950 with Evelyn Keyes, Charles Korvin, Lola Albright and an underused Dorothy Malone as a mousy nurse, but look closely and you'll still see her flash those famous come-hither eyes (above left) from the classic bookshop pick-up scene in The Big Sleep.

    Movies can walk and chew gum at the same time - tell two stories at once - but it does take some skill to seamlessly knit the separate threads together. In The Killer that Stalked New York, the writers and director Earl McEvoy failed to complete the knitting, so this overall solid movie suffers from being a bit of a bifurcated effort.

    The main tale is one of New York City on the brink of a smallpox outbreak with eerily similar overtones to today's Covid pandemic. But it is also the story of Treasury Department officers tracking stolen diamonds smuggled in from Cuba to be fenced in New York. The connection between the two stories is diamond "mule" Evelyn Keyes who knowingly brings the gems into the city while unknowingly bringing in smallpox.

    The knitting problem is mainly one of tone and style. The smallpox story is told kinda like a public service announcement film with a resonating-voiced narrator guiding us through how a city organizes its resources to prevent a pandemic. Conversely, the diamond-heist story has a traditional noir vibe of bad people doing bad things to both their friends and foes.

    With Keyes as the link between the two tales, we see her arrive in the city already feeling sick and, thus, spreading the disease. She immediately tries to connect with her husband, Korvin, who is going to sell the gems. Yet unknown to her, while she was away, he was having an affair. And upping the noirness, he wasn't just cheating on Keyes with another woman, but with her sister - damn, people can do really bad things to each other. Pause on that for a moment, while Keyes is down in Cuba getting the stolen diamonds and risking arrest smuggling them into the country for her husband, he's banging her sister, ouch.

    And if that isn't enough, while Keyes lies sick in bed, hubby takes the diamonds and whatever money she has and, employing a scorched-earth policy, skedaddles on both of the sisters. Keyes, with the sickness advancing to the point where her skin is showing the blisters - she's a bit frightening to look at now - is hellbent on finding her, no other word for it, scumbag husband. But all this noir stuff plays on in the background as the movie mainly focuses on the politicians' and healthcare community's efforts to stop the spread of the disease.

    Here, the parallels to today's Covid pandemic are jarring: an initial test and trace efforts fails; a public education outreach includes discussion of how the virus is transmitted through the air and by touch; once available, a huge public campaign ensues to convince everyone to get vaccinated; at times, there is not enough vaccine and, finally, we see a push by others against the vaccine who believe it is some sort of conspiracy. I know, it's frighteningly similar to today.

    Both stories are good and are, at the end, connected, once again, through Keyes because the Treasury officers and healthcare officials eventually team up to find her as the latter are now looking for her as patient zero. Unfortunately, the distinctive style and arc of the two stories leaves the viewer feeling as if he or she is almost watching separate movies at the same time. The combined effort is worth it, but you just can't help wishing the two narratives had been harmonized better.


    A double N.B. for this one. One, the 1950 on-location footage of New York City is time-travel heaven. And, two, in the opening scene, Keyes wears a houndstooth wool suit with a hat and coat lined in the same fabric (see below, it's the best pic I could find, but it doesn't do it justice). She looks impressive; she's a woman to be reckoned with, but that outfit must have cost a small fortune and probably explains why she needed to steal the diamonds in the first place.
    The KTSNY opup.jpg copy.jpg
     
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  11. crawlinkingsnake

    crawlinkingsnake A-List Customer

    Messages:
    374
    Location:
    West Virginia
    Great choice Zombie! It's been a favorite of mine for a long time.
     
  12. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,253
    Location:
    Northern California
    Just wait...
    :rolleyes:
     
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  13. sal

    sal One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    196
    Location:
    my own little slice of heaven
    Bogey in “The Black Legion” interesting to see him stretch his abilities
     
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  14. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,682
    Location:
    Germany
    He's fan of the 50s:

     
  15. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,059
    Location:
    Gads Hill, Ontario
    Friday night movie night, three words:

    "Birdie num nums"...
     
  16. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    Das mag sein, aber die meisten von uns sprechen kein Deutsch.
     
  17. Trenchfriend

    Trenchfriend I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,682
    Location:
    Germany
    But you see. :)
     
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  18. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,253
    Location:
    Northern California
    The last half of the Sweet Smell of Success on TCM. I have seen it many times. The last scene for Tony Curtis is my favorite scene in the movie not because of what happens to Curtis, but for its cinematography. It is a pretty darn good movie overall with a nice cast. :D
     
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  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    14,605
    Location:
    New York City
    1d9e2bc006f6baf5ab85cfe99a85dd8b.jpg
    The Blue Dahlia from 1946 with Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, William Bendix, Hugh Beaumont and Howard Da Silva

    Yes, The Blue Dahlia is another noir pairing of Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd, but it's also a disturbing look at a returning WWII serviceman with severe PTSD and, if that's not enough, it's also a fine "who killed the cheatin' wife" murder mystery.

    Character actor William Bendix delivers a career performance as the damaged veteran who can't keep the noises in his head straight and whose violent anger is sparked by loud music (or, sometimes, nothing). This man needs serious medical attention, but other than hanging with his two former service buddies, Ladd and Hugh Beaumont, he's on his own.

    When those three return from the war, Ladd finds his wife partying at their Los Angeles bungalow apartment where she is clearly having an affair with local nightclub-owner Howard Da Silva. Ladd and the wife fight, then after the party, they fight again and he leaves (and leaves his service revolver behind, gun-wall-hung). Later that evening, separately, Da Silva (looking for nooky) and Bendix (looking for Ladd) come by - all spied on by the slimy apartment-complex house detective.

    But when the wife is found shot dead the following morning, Ladd is the lead suspect owing to, one, the loud and public fight he had with his wife at the party and, two, his gun being the murder weapon. Realizing he looks guilty, Ladd goes on the lam so that he can find the real killer and clear his name.

    In a fortuitous occurrence that only happens in movieland, Veronica freakin' Lake drives by and stops to pick up Ladd as he's walking down the road. And in another movieland-only occurrence, she just happens to be the somewhat estranged wife of the man, Da Silva, who was having an affair with Ladd's wife (yes, it's a bit confusing). So, these two kinda sorta team up to help Ladd clear his name.

    The rest of the movie is solid noir - no surprise as the screenplay was penned by Raymond Chandler - as Ladd mixes it up with Da Silva and his henchmen, he and Lake quarrel on the surface but fall in love beneath it, the police stay a step behind both the bad guys and Ladd and damaged Bendix is all but beaten by the police into confessing, true or not, to killing the wife.

    Chandler's original ending, according to the TCM host, was changed for the movie, at the request of the Navy, to a new ending that you might or might not like, but as with most noir movies, the journey is the real joy. And the journey in this one is greatly enhanced by Lake and Ladd who have palpable screen chemistry as they are, arguably, the first couple of Noirland. And if all that's not enough, there's plenty of 1940s period details, noir cinematography and Art Deco architecture to make it a fun time capsule for us today.


    N.B. Check out the early on massive-downpour scene that runs for at least twenty minutes of screen time and that has the actors constantly soaked to the bone. It had to be challenging to film and unpleasant to act in, but it is powerfully effective in setting the mood by subliminally telling the viewer that this noir movie will be no sunny Los Angeles story.


    Three returning WWII vets showing us what men looked like in the 1940s.
    D4ddY7YX4AAhUwo.jpg
    Really wanted to post another pic of Veronica Lake, but this one ⇧ was just too good to pass up.
     
  20. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,253
    Location:
    Northern California
    As usual, the last half of another movie, From Russia with Love. :D
    Also saw part of another movie the name of which I cannot remember. I believe it was Rage of Honor. Yes, it was Rage of Honor. There was no honor in the making of this movie. It made Steven SeagalVanDammeNorris look like masters of cinema. Bad all the way around and yet it kept my attention for way longer than any roadside accident should.
    :D
     
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