Who likes vintage tools?

Discussion in 'The Display Case' started by reetpleat, Mar 27, 2009.

  1. alanfgag

    alanfgag

    Messages:
    14,322
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    These are older than vintage... ancient excavated Native American.

    native_tools.jpg
     
  2. A welder from 1976 is fairly vintage ... right? Planning on learning some skills in retirement that result in something other than ones and zeros. Lincoln Idealarc 250 AC/DC welder.

    Lincoln_Idealarc_250_AC_DC_Welder_1976.jpg
     
    Turnip likes this.
  3. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,609
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    That 8th grade smartass in me wants to respond with...."Thankfully my wife does"
     
    BobHufford likes this.
  4. Bugguy

    Bugguy A-List Customer

    Messages:
    446
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    Here's one of my retirement restoration projects. A hand crank American Scroll Saw from Delta in the rough. About 1921 vintage. Not too hard, as I've cheated and started cleaning and lubricating. One accepted modification is to add a belt and motor. If I can find one, I might actually use it.

    IMG_3938.jpeg


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  5. Very cool! I've been watching a couple of these lately.

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  6. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    oakland
    The wife was gracious enough to buy me this little air compressor. Ended up needing some work but I really like the chuff-chuff-chuff sound.

    mike
     

    Attached Files:

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  7. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Europe
    That´s a chasing hammer, typically used by gold- and silversmiths.

    Cheers

    Turnip
     
    Farace likes this.
  8. This 10” Boice-Crane scroll saw followed me home from a local auction yesterday. Too cute to leave there at $35. Robbins and Myers 1/4-HP motor and a repurposed sewing machine stand. 1929/32 (only catalogs that show the smaller 10" model with the rocker arms).

    Boice_Crane_Scroll_Saw_1.JPG

    Boice_Crane_Scroll_Saw_2.JPG

    Boice_Crane_Scroll_Saw_3.JPG

    Boice_Crane_Scroll_Saw_1930_Catalog.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2020
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  9. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Europe
    ~80 years old 80kg PFP-anvil, Stock- or Northern German Standard-version.
    Wolf´s jaw tongs is way newer, purchased new myself, as well as the watch.

    [​IMG]

    Cheers

    Turnip
     
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  10. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Europe
    These heavy war horses are almost indestructible!

    Is that a Linde gas management on top for inert/active gas or just an inverter?
     
  11. It is the former. It came with the fittings, but not the bottle sitting next to it for some reason (an estate sale find). That phase of my welding education is on the back-burner for now.

    Idealarc_Welder_Gas.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020
    Turnip likes this.
  12. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Europe
    Ha, cool, i learned welding with such tractors, ESAB LTG400..., about 35 years ago...:)

    Nowadays I just run an ESAB LHN200 from time to time, almost an oldtimer as well.

    Here’s a petrol brazing torch. Got a second one somewhere around in my workshop , but currently no pic on hand.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Cheers

    Turnip
     
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  13. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    692
    Location:
    Europe
    Some pix of vintage tools from the garden shed...

    Bench and vise approx. 60 years old.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    PFP-anvil ~80kg

    [​IMG]

    Some boiler maker´s hammers, opprox. 70 years old.

    [​IMG]

    Second gasoline brazing torch.

    [​IMG]

    Cheers

    Turnip
     
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  14. Will be picking up this online auction win on Saturday. A 1940s Duro slow-speed bench model 14" drill press.

    Duro_Drill_Press_01.jpg

    Duro_Drill_Press_03.jpg

    Duro_Drill_Press_06.jpg

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  15. green papaya

    green papaya One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,243
    Location:
    California, usa
    old meat cleaver.jpg

    Old butcher shop meat cleaver dating from around 1875 - 1880's
     
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  16. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    Thought I’d ask this question here, hopefully someone either knows the answer or can point me in the right direction.

    I have what was my grandfather’s (or maybe even his father’s) antique Craftsman drill press. I can go out to the garage later and get a model number and maybe a photo. The outboard electric motor spins up to where I can hear the centrifugal switch click, and then it slows down again until the centrifugal switch snaps back and then it will spin up again. This will happen over and over until eventually it gets past that point and spins up to speed. If I try drilling, it might slow down and get into that cycle again. I know that I could just replace the motor, but I’d like to repair the existing motor if I can to keep everything in the right era. Any thoughts? Thanks!
     
  17. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    Photos to go with my previous post.

    3B3E2DAF-FE4E-45D6-8E1F-CD58CCAE99D6.jpeg

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    Motorinfo:

    A194A6D9-BD33-43CE-9203-8146988B041D.jpeg

    992545CC-E1D8-43DE-9EF7-03668F59FB61.jpeg
     
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  18. Farace likes this.
  19. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    Thank you, that Facebook group in just the short time since I joined has proved very helpful. Among other things, it was pointed out that the motor was never meant for vertical operation, as evidenced by the orientation of the oilers! So now I’m on the lookout for an appropriate replacement motor, hopefully of similar vintage (which I’m told is 1947-49). Thanks again for the help.
     
    BobHufford likes this.
  20. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    I ended up rehabbing/de-rusting/cleaning/relubricating my grandfather’s 1947-49 Craftsman benchtop drill press. Haven’t gotten the appropriate motor yet, so I reinstalled what was there until I get the right one. Not a museum piece, but a lot cleaner and more useable. Here’s the result.

    D72CB43B-07D5-421C-B5D1-94AE38B76AED.jpeg
     
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