Who likes vintage tools?

Discussion in 'The Display Case' started by reetpleat, Mar 27, 2009.

  1. ^^^^^ Looks great @Farace! So cool that you have that tie back to your Grandfather.
     
  2. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    715
    Location:
    Europe
    Some vintage brain tools, both 1941 editions.

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    Cheers

    Turnip
     
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  3. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    oakland
    Farace, check over on the Garage Journal for more info about your press. If I remember right that is a Model 100 and there is one person over there that collects nothing but sears power tools from that era. Great that you rehabbed it and are keeping it in the family.

    Mike
     
    Farace likes this.
  4. Farace

    Farace Familiar Face

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Connecticut USA
    Latest pandemic project, before and after. Needed a vise after the piece of Chinese junk that I got from my dad broke in half. Picked up this mid-‘40s Craftsman (made by Reed Manufacturing, patent date 1938) on Thursday for a *very* reasonable price. It was frozen up solid; I got everything moving with PB Blaster, de-greased, de-rusted, re-painted, and lubed up to “user” level (I couldn’t see much point in going crazy polishing, filling pits, etc.; I’m using it, not collecting it) and got it reassembled today. Much better, and that Chinese alleged “vise” will go into the scrap where it belonged in the first place. It’s a sad commentary when a rehabbed 75-year-old tool is better than what’s available new. But it’s nice to make it useful again.

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  5. Bugguy

    Bugguy A-List Customer

    Messages:
    446
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    While a fairly new Craftsman is OK, I passed it on to my son-in-law in favor of my father's good old one - like yours. I used it growing up and it has an emotional attachment. It's solid, smooth, and "gives me joy".
     
    Farace likes this.
  6. Bugguy

    Bugguy A-List Customer

    Messages:
    446
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    My father had this pinned to his workshop wall as long as I can remember. This is a copy of the original print - advertising piece, I assume. Owatonna Tool Company (OTC) is still around in some form - progressed beyond gear-pullers to automotive test equipment.

    Dad was a machinist, foreman in shop like this before and after WWII. These vintage factory pictures really strike a chord with me. This goes back to a time when employer-employee loyalty was a two-way street. My father was treated like part of the owners family... 35+ years.

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  7. Turnip

    Turnip Practically Family

    Messages:
    715
    Location:
    Europe
    Here’s a pic I took in a maintenance workshop of a historic 40s wool mill.

    Complete machinery such as column drill press, lathe, metal plane...is transmission belt driven like the pic you attached. Floor is clay, cobbled with wood cut from squared timber, called „brain wood, and is pretty well vibration absorbing.

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  8. ^^^^^ I love these belt-driven shops. If I ever win the lottery I'm going to build one and power it using the water wheel (in our front yard) that was used to power a saw mill back in the day. Unfortunately just the cost of getting the wheel operational is around $10K. My wife's Granddad had this spinning again back in the 1980s, but nature has had it's way with it.

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  9. Some 1945/46 era pics from my wife's Granddad's time as a Quarterman (Building / Maintenance) at the Olathe Naval Station in Kansas.

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  10. My Mom's family's farm recently receive their Century Farm designation. I was up there picking up my Grandma's (later my Uncle's) 1949 Allis-Chalmers WD tractor that my cousins graciously let me have after my Uncle passed earlier this year. While there they invited me to dig around in the old barn for "treasures". I came out with my great-grandfather's anvil.

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    Excuse the oil stain -- I was trying to bring out the stampings.

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    PETER
    WRIGHT
    PATENT
    ENGLAND
    ("SOLID WROUGHT" circular stamp with middle weight mark inside [usually])
    X X X<-- English hundredweight marks


    This dates it between 1890 and 1909.

    The 1 - 0 - 8 translates into 120 pounds. Multiply the first number by 112, the second by 56 and add the third.

    Oh ... here is the tractor:

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  11. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    oakland
    Dang that is a tank! And from what I understand they are bullet proof, have fun with it. Are you going to put her to use or just a restore?

    mike
     
  12. Mike -- it will get used some, but I would have to put a 3-point conversion on it to use my existing implements. I'm just happy to have the family heirloom to go along with my wife's Granddad's '57 Ford 860. A "restoration" will be down the road a bit. The Ford has been the go-to tractor and I recently bought a newer Kubota (with loader and 4WD) that has proved very handy so far. My neighbor is giving me a Farmall Cub project as well so I might have to build a new shed!
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2020
    Farace likes this.
  13. Got my late father-in-law's welding table in a bit better shape (cosmetically anyway). Still need to clean up and mount the vise.

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    Farace likes this.
  14. 1930artdeco

    1930artdeco Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Location:
    oakland
    Sort of a tool....but found this for my daughter when she moves into her own place. Tells you how to buy and use hand/power tools and how cabinets/houses are made. How to fix things, just really good beginners how to book. And I love how woman is ‘swooning’ over the guy with brace:D

    mike
     

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    BobHufford likes this.
  15. Another little project. 1965 Delta/Rockwell 12” abrasive disk finishing machine.

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