Aero Linings

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by kronos77, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. kronos77

    kronos77 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I am looking for an Aero lining that is warm but not bulky.

    I have a Schott 141 here with a zip out faux fur lining. It is a bit bulky I feel but keeps me warm. If you are familiar with this jacket and lining, can you suggest something by Aero that will not puff out so much but still be as warm?
     
  2. Sloan1874

    Sloan1874 I'll Lock Up

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    Alpaca is probably your thing. If not that, then either mole skin or mid-weight wool.
     
  3. Fanch

    Fanch I'll Lock Up

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    I think what Sloan just said. My Teamster is my go to winter foul weather coat and is lined with moleskin. Another option would be corduroy lining. Cotton drill lining for sleeves though.
     
  4. kronos77

    kronos77 One of the Regulars

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    How bulky is the alpaca?
     
  5. It's not.
     
  6. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I just got an alpaca wool lined jacket and it's great, not bulky at all imo
     
  7. Peacoat

    Peacoat Bartender Staff Member Bartender

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    I have both. The Aero Alpaca is a bit thinner than the Schott liner. It is not bulky at all, but then I wouldn't say the Schott liner is bulky either.
     
  8. repo

    repo Familiar Face

    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    Uk
    I think moleskin is warm and feels substantial but not bulky. I've always thought the alpaca was a bit thin but I believe they are now using a heavier weight.
     
  9. Sloan1874

    Sloan1874 I'll Lock Up

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    In order of descending warmth, it goes: alpaca, moleskin/cord, wool. The alpaca is thicker than previous types used, and is very warm. I tend to go with a light wool liner and then layer-up with jumpers, to give maximum flexibility. I think if I was going to go for any of the other options, I'd probably go with the moleskin.
     
  10. Amir

    Amir New in Town

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    Location:
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    I have a FQHH Teamster with the Alpaca wool lining, and cotton drill sleeves, and find it's OK in temperatures (give or take) down to around 30 F (-1C), with proper layering.
    My goatskin Dustbowl has moleskin lining, with cotton drill sleeves, for temps generally in the mid-40's.
    Above the low to mid 50's F (12C), I break out my A-2.
     
  11. Sockeye

    Sockeye One of the Regulars

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    Location:
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    I would personally go with corduroy or moleskin, hopefully in a jacket with room for layering. Air is a decent insulator, and a tight leather jacket will conduct the heat away from you fast. Aero's alpaca is warm, however mine was too itchy to wear comfortably and so my Highwayman is back with Aero now getting cotton drill relined. Storm cuffs also help hold the heat in.
     
  12. kronos77

    kronos77 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks for the help.

    The main reason for my concern is I am getting a Sheene, which is a close fitting jacket. A barnstormer wouldn't cause me much concern. I will be wearing a light weater under it and probably not standing outside for hours. Looks like alpaca or moleskin.

    Is there a benefit to perhaps moleskin and an extra layer of a light lining to significantly increase warmth without bulk?

    Sockeye: When you said the alpaca was itchy, you mean the body lining or were the sleeves lined with alpaca too? Does it even itch through a shirt?
     
  13. jacketjunkie

    jacketjunkie One Too Many

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    Location:
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    My Teamster is lined in alpaca. It's fairly thin and not bulky at all. It does itch on bare skin (neck area mostly when not wearing a scarf), but not to point where it is uncomfortable to wear it. It's no cashmere and that's about it.
     
  14. GraceNote13

    GraceNote13 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    145
    My bootlegger has the heavy weight tartan lining, it's not bulky but it's not very warm at all. Cold Chicago winter's don't work without some serious sweaters underneath.
     
  15. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I depends when you got the alpaca, from what I understand the stuff they are using now (which is in my jacket) doesn't itch at all unless you are specifically allergic to wool. So if its an older jacket, it may itch, a newer one shouldn't ....mine doesn't at all.
     
  16. Fanch

    Fanch I'll Lock Up

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    Moleskin doesn't itch either. ;) Fortunately I don't have to survive Chicago winters - only N Texas summers. :D
     
  17. Sloan1874

    Sloan1874 I'll Lock Up

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    Chicago winters are hard. I would recommend an Irvin or similar as a jacket.
     
  18. Sockeye

    Sockeye One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    Mine had just the body in alpaca. When I say it was itchy I mean it drove me crazy. I'm not sure how old it was. In regard to Chicago winters, I have been through enough to suggest storm cuffs, a little longer jacket and a little extra room. Whether you get alpaca or just a fleece under, leaving a little room will equate to being much warmer and more comfortable. Also, in the cold patch pockets are quite useful to store bulky items without opening the jacket or removing gloves. Good luck, winter approaches!
     
  19. Edward

    Edward Bartender

    Messages:
    20,442
    Location:
    London, UK
    I've never had the Alpaca, but I have experience of the other two. Wool is nice if you want the look of the tartan, and it is, in my experience, significantly warmer than cotton drill. Moleskin is also quite warm, and definitely much harder wearing than wool.



    I wouldn't see any great benefit in putting an extra layer on top of the moleskin.

    Here's a thing, though... if you're looking for a warm jacket, I'd be very wary of going with the Sheen. It's a neat-fitting design, and quite short. It's designed to be worn neat without much under it. Size up for layering and you run the risk of it looking all wrong (a Highwayman might then be the better option); put a warm lining in a slim fitting jacket you can't layer under, and what you can end up with is a jacket that's got a very limited season during which it can be worn without being either not warm enough, or far too warm. Give this aspect of it a lot of careful thought.
     
  20. kronos77

    kronos77 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Exactly my concern. I feel though, that I don't need much layering beyond a very light sweater. That's what I have been doing with my 141, wearing it in temps from 55 F down to whatever. Of course I am not walking around for hours in zero degree weather. Our cold here is not Chicago cold or New England cold. Still, not ruining the look of the Sheene is something I am most concerned with.
     

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