Anyone tried Aero beeswax or similar?

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by NZJono, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. NZJono

    NZJono New in Town

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Hi all
    Considering a new Aero, likely in Vincenza or Goat. I put water on some samples and after about 30mins the Vicenza was soaked through but the goat was impervious and seemed to be highly water resistant. I realise we don’t buy leather jackets as rain coats but it would be nice to have a jacket that can withstand a bit of rain if needed.
    I’m sure the Aero beeswax would help repel water if I went with the Vincenza option.
    Has anyone tried it or anything similar?. Thanks.
     
  2. Boyo

    Boyo One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,414
    Location:
    Long Island NY
    Nah..I wouldn't wax a leather jacket... I could see that making the jacket gunk'd up and sticky

    Get the Goat if water resilience is important.. The Aero goat Ive handled is beautiful..
     
    sweetfights and NZJono like this.
  3. Psant25

    Psant25 Practically Family

    Messages:
    586
    Agree no wax. I would go with goat then of those two
     
    sweetfights and NZJono like this.
  4. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,453
    Location:
    Australia
    Goat is the most water proof and resilient leather going. The Aero goat is substantial and develops character quickly, unlike some of the standard chrome tanned goat often seen on mass produced A2's.
     
    NZJono likes this.
  5. Lebowski

    Lebowski Practically Family

    Messages:
    867
    It is unless it's veg tanned goat which absorbs water well.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
    NZJono likes this.
  6. Carlos840

    Carlos840 Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,594
    Location:
    London
    Personally i don't see a problem with applying something to the leather...
    I have a Golden Bear leather deck jacket that is made from a matt naked cowhide that soaked up water like blotting paper.
    Water drop wouldn't even bead, they would soak straight in.
    I gave it a couple thin coats of Pecards, it has given the leather a very nice sheen, has helped it retain creases and has made it waterproof. Water now beads on it and nothing soaks through.
    The leather never felt greasy or sticky after the treatment.

    If you prefer Vicenza, just get a Vicenza jacket. If after living with it you realize it isn't waterproof enough, do something about it then.

    Also keep in mind that wet leather doesn't mean you will be wet underneath.
    Even my LW was completely soaked a couple weeks back after getting rained on for 4 days straight, the leather was soaked, but water never made it through to the lining and i was never wet in the jacket.
     
    Jrolfe and NZJono like this.
  7. NZJono

    NZJono New in Town

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Thanks, good tips. I really like the navy vincenza.
     
  8. Psant25

    Psant25 Practically Family

    Messages:
    586
    Well sure a conditioner. I just do not think the wax. Unless you used a very small amount and really worked it in. Ive used a number of conditioners/cleaners/protectors

    i like the one JL recommends and also lanlitz tub o shine that comes with their new jackets
     
  9. JacketAddict

    JacketAddict One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    138
    Agree with Langlitz - one of the best I've used. Suprisingly another great condition/cleaner is Wesco Bees Oil - for leather boots but I have used it on a few jackets and it works great - it seems to darken the leather at first but that does not last once it "soaks" in.
     
  10. dan_t

    dan_t Practically Family

    Messages:
    875
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Generally speaking, chrome tanned will provide substantially better water resistance to veg tanned hides. what about a tumbled cxl fqhh?
     
  11. Guppy

    Guppy My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,016
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    I treat my leather boots with a product called SNO SEAL, which is made from beeswax. It might be 100% beeswax for all I know. It is great. It protects and waterproofs the leather, and helps preserve the leather. It requires a hair dryer to make it heat up enough to soak into and penetrate the pores of the leather. I haven't tried it on a leather jacket, but I've treated wallets and gloves with it, and had the same great results with it. I can think of no reason why it wouldn't work on a leather jacket
     
  12. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Midwest
    I believe SnoSeal has silicone in it? Some say that is a no-no. Others don't. I'm not a particular fan of SnoSeal because it seems like it constantly needs to be re-applied, at least more often than others I've tried. It's inexpensive, so that might not be an issue for some. I don't care for how it smells, either. It has a strong chemical stink to it. Another complaint about SnoSeal is that it was originally made for how leather was tanned many years ago. I don't know enough about the history of tanning to know the advancements and how they would benefit from this or that product. Just throwing it out there. As for a hair dryer, I believe leather should always be heated up before applying waterproofing or conditioning. I never do either without using a hair dryer.
     
  13. navetsea

    navetsea My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,146
    Location:
    East Java
    mink oil also make it somewhat waterproof, with wax I'm afraid it would leave flaky white stuff on the creases once the wax dry, because jacket crease a lot compared to shoes.
     
    Psant25 likes this.
  14. navetsea

    navetsea My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,146
    Location:
    East Java
    I once tried applying shoe wax (beewax & carnauba wax) to give some shine back on my jacket, I only apply it here and there not everywhere, only highlighting on the top of bulging out creases using the tip of my index finger only, and buff it out with old tshirt, first I tried with transparent shoe wax, and after some wear I got white flaky stuff crumbling because even on a broken in jacket with settling in creases, those creases aren't permanent, and somehow as we move around the jacket might twist or flap temporarily creases differently and that is enough to break the wax.

    so after removing the transparent wax, I tried colored shoe polish (brown) do exactly the same, buff it even more, and it somewhat works, maybe it still cracks and flaking every now and then, but since it is brown it doesn't show.

    I tried polishing my brass belt buckle with transparent shoe polish to preserve its patina (since it already have some brown patina and I don't want green stuff patina) on it, now that works :) buckle shines/ gleam more without losing its patina, I just use the inside of my tshirt I'm wearing to buff it whenever it get scratches or dulling from handling
     
  15. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Midwest
    You probably could have remedied the white build-up in the creases with a hair dryer. Again...a hair dryer is an indispensable tool when working with leather. A little warmth changes the entire game.
     
    Carlos840 and navetsea like this.
  16. Guppy

    Guppy My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,016
    Location:
    Cleveland, OH
    I don't think there's any silicone in SNO SEAL, but maybe you're thinking of a different product. The stuff I'm familiar with doesn't have any chemical odor, just a nice beeswaxy odor.

    This is the stuff I'm talking about: http://www.atsko.com/sno-seal-wax-8-oz-jar/

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,453
    Location:
    Australia
    But not as absorbent as Vicenza. I have a had a veg tanned goat jacket that did well in rain.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2019
  18. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Midwest
    Yes, sir. That's the one. I have some in front of me right now. As pricey as Obenauf's is, I keep other products around for my junky gear and less important.
     
  19. Dr H

    Dr H One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,903
    Location:
    Somerset, UK
    I’d steer clear of waterproofing (a capeskin A-1, which had been treated, that I had a decade ago squeaked every time I moved).
    My deerskin FW Journeyman is absolutely rock solid in rain - warm, dry, and dries out really quickly with no hardening.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2019

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.