Esquire’s Complete Golden Age Illustrations:

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Flanderian, Aug 20, 2020.

  1. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the Esquire illustration for November 1937.


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  2. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the illustrations for Esquire, December 1937.

    I know; slim pickings. Was Arnie off on a toot! ;)


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  3. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    As addlepated as ever, I note I omitted two illustrations from January 1935. So I'm offering them here -


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    Fastuni likes this.
  4. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Location:
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    Beautiful. I study each and every illustration.

    On topic: 1937 travel footage with plenty of period clothing...

     
  5. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    Great film clip! Thanks.
     
  6. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are Esquire's illustrations for January 1938.


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  7. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,807
    Location:
    New York City
    Upper right, white bucks with light grey trousers is my favorite "lost to time" look

    Lower left, that is one substantial looking "terrycloth beach robe."

    Lower right, the tan suit/outfit is outstanding.
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  8. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

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    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    I've always enjoyed tan suits for summer. I wonder what cloth is meant, as it's not specified? Those I've had were cotton poplin, but the drape suggests wool, and more specifically, gabardine, though that was more often a spring/fall cloth than summer.
     
  9. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the Esquire illustrations for February 1938.


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  10. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the Esquire illustrations for March 1938.


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  11. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    This is the balance of March 1938.


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  12. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,807
    Location:
    New York City
    I was surprised they didn't mention the material either, but purely from memory (meaning, nothing definitive), almost all of the summer tan suits in Esquire in the '30s were, as you said, gaberdine or some other lightweight wool.

    Again, only from memory from what I've read, it seems that cottons/poplins/blends for summer suits didn't really take off until the '50s.

    That said, I'm sure with enough looking, we'd fine a 1922 advertisement in some newspaper from some store announcing "the new thing: cotton summer suits." Most things go back much farther than we think, but only "take off" decades later.
     
  13. Tiki Tom

    Tiki Tom One Too Many

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    Location:
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    It seems that I once read that men's cotton fabrics began to gain in popularity after the British started using cotton cloth for uniforms in warmer climates in the mid-1800s. The birth of khaki, and all that. I might be wrong. As FF said, most things go farther back than we think.
     
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  14. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    Hard to say. During this period wool swimsuits for both men and women were the norm. while I find it difficult to imagine anything more uncomfortable seeming.

    I suspect you're correct. Certainly by the period in which these illustrations appeared, cotton seersucker was established as a summer alternative. And cotton drill the standard of the British Army in hot climates.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020 at 6:55 PM
  15. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the Esquire illustrations for April 1938.


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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020 at 6:56 PM
  16. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    The balance of April 1938.


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  17. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    These are the Esquire Illustrations for May 1938.


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  18. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

    Messages:
    13,807
    Location:
    New York City
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    Not really that similar, but the gentleman ⇧ wearing a hat and smoking a pipe playing golf
    reminded me a bit of this famous fella ⇩ doing the same
    Ways-to-Stay-Stylish-While-on-the-Golf-Course-2.jpg

    ⇩ Looks like a variation on our old friend (from a few days ago) the diamond pattern (or is it similar but not really one?).
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  19. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,233
    Location:
    Germany
    Interesting how frequently these illustrations show and mention 'Tyrolean' hats... I knew they existed also outside Germany, the alpine region or continental Europe, but would not have thought they were that much of a thing in the US.

    I love Alpine style and loden hats... but I think some combinations shown here are not that good, for example tapered, casual tyroleans with pinstripe DBs.
     
  20. Flanderian

    Flanderian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    142
    Location:
    Flanders, NJ, USA
    I've seen the top photo before, but am uncertain as to the golfer. I've seen photos of Slammin' Sammy (Sam Sneed) posed in this manner, and it also resembles Bing Crosby, who golfed, and for whom a pipe was a frequent prop.

    The second illustration is certainly another handsome example of the diamond patterned tweed.
    In my boyhood in the early '50's they were still quite common. The borrowed style was usually not entirely authentic, and the materials used sometime not the best, but they offered a different and sporting alternative to a traditional fur felt fedora. These practical hats were typically more casual, often not expensive, and quite flattering on the right man.

    While the period depicted is now classic, at the time it was fashion. And those who sold it sought novelty to help stimulate sales. The classic Tyrolean hat was fun and handsome, and different enough to intrigue a market then still largely insular and unaccustomed to greater variety.


    Edit: I would definitely agree, I think a Tyrolean hat is more casual and sporting, and would consider it unappealing with more formal suits! Couldn't find the specific illustration you reference, do you happen to recall the specific month and year of the issue in which it appeared?
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020 at 6:38 PM

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