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Footwear to go with our jackets

Yamahana

One Too Many
Messages
1,015
Location
Buckeye, Arizona

lina

Practically Family
Messages
994
Location
Washington DC
Decided to pull the trigger on a pair of Alden "Roy" boots. The Roy boot was first offered by the Wisconsin store Context Clothing, as a special make up from Alden (makers of the famous Indy Boots). Context is out of business, but looks like Alden Madison in NY offers the same make up on occasion. Have been thinking I would like a pair of more comfortable boots for walking than my regular Chippewas and White's, so opened up the wallet for these. They are surely not work boots, with a crepe sole and leather toe tap, as well CXL leather, but they look heritage-y enough and should be comfy. I am looking forward to putting some wear on them.


roy boots 1.jpg roy boots 2.jpg
 

lina

Practically Family
Messages
994
Location
Washington DC
A prompt update: I've been wearing these for the past three days, and I have to say that they are incredibly comfortable. The crepe soles really make a big difference. They will no doubt wear down pretty quickly, but to my mind the comfort factor makes it worthwhile. The boots are not cheap, but if you are looking for a "sneaker boot," these seem to me to be about as close as you get while still counting as "boots."
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,620
Decided to pull the trigger on a pair of Alden "Roy" boots. The Roy boot was first offered by the Wisconsin store Context Clothing, as a special make up from Alden (makers of the famous Indy Boots). Context is out of business, but looks like Alden Madison in NY offers the same make up on occasion. Have been thinking I would like a pair of more comfortable boots for walking than my regular Chippewas and White's, so opened up the wallet for these. They are surely not work boots, with a crepe sole and leather toe tap, as well CXL leather, but they look heritage-y enough and should be comfy. I am looking forward to putting some wear on them.


View attachment 608510 View attachment 608511

I think these still very much count as work boots; the crepe sole won't grip onto slippery surfaces the way a commando sole will, however it adds to the overall sense of support and shock distribution. It's true that they don't have a reinforced toe cap, however those are suboptimal for some kinds of work.
 

lina

Practically Family
Messages
994
Location
Washington DC
I think these still very much count as work boots; the crepe sole won't grip onto slippery surfaces the way a commando sole will, however it adds to the overall sense of support and shock distribution. It's true that they don't have a reinforced toe cap, however those are suboptimal for some kinds of work.
Good point. When I was growing up in the 1970s, my mom worked on the line at the Westinghouse factory and the hardest part of job was standing on her feet all day. These would’ve been perfect for that sort of factory work. (although they would’ve cost her probably two months salary!)
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,620
Good point. When I was growing up in the 1970s, my mom worked on the line at the Westinghouse factory and the hardest part of job was standing on her feet all day. These would’ve been perfect for that sort of factory work. (although they would’ve cost her probably two months salary!)

I'm sure you're familiar with the backstory of how the 403 boot came to be the Indy boot. Not dissimilar.
 

lina

Practically Family
Messages
994
Location
Washington DC
I'm sure you're familiar with the backstory of how the 403 boot came to be the Indy boot. Not dissimilar.
Do you mean the original, the 405 I believe..? Yes, and I always liked that before Harrison Ford wore them for the movie they had for decades been marketed by Alden as "the high work shoe." That seems about right to me.
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,620
Do you mean the original, the 405 I believe..? Yes, and I always liked that before Harrison Ford wore them for the movie they had for decades been marketed by Alden as "the high work shoe." That seems about right to me.

I’m likely mixing up the model number, but yeah. The costumers had brought out a number of boots, none of which were sufficiently supportive, but his existing work boots from carpentry were just right.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,832
Location
London, UK
I just received my second pair Chausser button boots, now in a reddish brown two tone. They're really versatile as they go great with both casual and formal outfits.

View attachment 607997 View attachment 607998 View attachment 607999 View attachment 608000 View attachment 608001 View attachment 608002 View attachment 608003

Lovely shape to these. Some day I'd love something like this with a suede top half for full formal daywear.

Those are Rockabilly Kool! They’re known as Pee Wee boots.

did the 'PeeWee' appellation come about because part of Acme's drive to make fancier boots available production line - and therefore affordably - during the Western boom of the 50s inevitably included selling a lot of them in kids' sizes? There's one model they did with a Maltese cross I wish someone would repop (chiefly as that was what Meatloaf wore in the Rocky Horror Picture Show). I've seen one or two pairs online over the years, but never in adult sizes. (I expect all the adult size ones were worn to death.)

Decided to pull the trigger on a pair of Alden "Roy" boots. The Roy boot was first offered by the Wisconsin store Context Clothing, as a special make up from Alden (makers of the famous Indy Boots). Context is out of business, but looks like Alden Madison in NY offers the same make up on occasion. Have been thinking I would like a pair of more comfortable boots for walking than my regular Chippewas and White's, so opened up the wallet for these. They are surely not work boots, with a crepe sole and leather toe tap, as well CXL leather, but they look heritage-y enough and should be comfy. I am looking forward to putting some wear on them.


View attachment 608510 View attachment 608511

Interesting sole - is that a leather section at the toe?

A prompt update: I've been wearing these for the past three days, and I have to say that they are incredibly comfortable. The crepe soles really make a big difference. They will no doubt wear down pretty quickly, but to my mind the comfort factor makes it worthwhile. The boots are not cheap, but if you are looking for a "sneaker boot," these seem to me to be about as close as you get while still counting as "boots."

Great option for that. Looks replaceable, too, which is always worth doing on a quality boot when comes the time.

I think these still very much count as work boots; the crepe sole won't grip onto slippery surfaces the way a commando sole will, however it adds to the overall sense of support and shock distribution. It's true that they don't have a reinforced toe cap, however those are suboptimal for some kinds of work.

Definitely horses for courses. When I worked in a hardware / building supplies store during my university years, I always wore a pair of steel toecap boots. Saved my foot from a serious breakage the day an old, heavy wooden counter drawer ran right off its rails and dropped out on my foot, but when I wasn't running those sorts of risks they definitely were kicked off outside of work in the hot weather.


I’m likely mixing up the model number, but yeah. The costumers had brought out a number of boots, none of which were sufficiently supportive, but his existing work boots from carpentry were just right.

Yip. As I recollect, they originally planned to put Indy in RedWings, but Ford asked for the Aldens with which he was familiar. Seems funny now to imagine Indy in a pair of Iron Rangers...
 

lina

Practically Family
Messages
994
Location
Washington DC
Interesting sole - is that a leather section at the toe?
Yes, leather toe taps -- slightly odd in that with leather soles people often have metal toe taps installed to prevent wear. I assume it was more of an aesthetic choice than a functional one. But it'll be interesting to see how long they last, and how they hold up compared to the rubber sole.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,832
Location
London, UK
Yes, leather toe taps -- slightly odd in that with leather soles people often have metal toe taps installed to prevent wear. I assume it was more of an aesthetic choice than a functional one. But it'll be interesting to see how long they last, and how they hold up compared to the rubber sole.

I'd expect them to wear rather slower than a crepe sole. Could be as you say an aesthetic choice as much as anything - it certainly does look cool.
 

Observe

One Too Many
Messages
1,061
I've been leaning more towards practical outdoor clothing and footwear for the last few months. I've avoided going full "gorpcore", instead opting for a blend of traditional and modern fabrics and styles. I've particularly been focused on boots, which have always given me trouble in terms of fitting due to my wide forefoot, low instep and narrow ankle. My toes are almost always squat in the toe box and my heel is almost always slipping in the back. I've tried a range of modern hiking boot styles from brands such as Lowa, Hanwag, Crispi and other brands that would not be of any interest to TFL. However, I have been eyeing a more traditional leather hiking boot from Limmer Boots, a New England based company with over a hundred years of being in business. I was wondering if anyone here had experience with this company and could share their experiences if so. I intend to send them an email this week regarding the fit of their boots to see if they'd work for my finicky feet. I'd likely go for their "standard" model, as seen in the following link and picture: https://limmerboots.com/products/the-standard Limmer-Boots-Standard-Hiking-Boots-front-angled.jpg
Any other general experiences or advice with traditional style hiking boots would also be appreciated!
 

Schambach

Practically Family
Messages
518
Location
Ithaca, NY
I've been leaning more towards practical outdoor clothing and footwear for the last few months. I've avoided going full "gorpcore", instead opting for a blend of traditional and modern fabrics and styles. I've particularly been focused on boots, which have always given me trouble in terms of fitting due to my wide forefoot, low instep and narrow ankle. My toes are almost always squat in the toe box and my heel is almost always slipping in the back. I've tried a range of modern hiking boot styles from brands such as Lowa, Hanwag, Crispi and other brands that would not be of any interest to TFL. However, I have been eyeing a more traditional leather hiking boot from Limmer Boots, a New England based company with over a hundred years of being in business. I was wondering if anyone here had experience with this company and could share their experiences if so. I intend to send them an email this week regarding the fit of their boots to see if they'd work for my finicky feet. I'd likely go for their "standard" model, as seen in the following link and picture: https://limmerboots.com/products/the-standard View attachment 613668
Any other general experiences or advice with traditional style hiking boots would also be appreciated!
I have a pair of Limmer standards that I've had for about 5 months now. My girlfriend and I drove up to New Hampshire last summer and got fitted. She's an avid hiker, and I mostly just spend a lot of time in the woods, building and maintaining trails, and walking my dog. I'm pretty happy with the boots so far. The only real negative I can see is the weight, and you do feel it on longer hikes. They definitely fit differently than what I've been used to. The toebox is huge and wide, not a lot of arch support. Kind of the opposite of 55 lasted PNW boots that I often wear. I find them very comfortable out in the woods though, and very stable. They've been waterproof as well, I haven't treated them with anything yet.

If you can, go there and get fitted. I'd have gone with a 10.5 D, like most of my other boots, but in Limmer sizing I needed an 11 EE. And while we both went with standard(non custom) sizing, the boots took about 6 months. It's also a beautiful area, worth visiting if possible.
 

Observe

One Too Many
Messages
1,061
I have a pair of Limmer standards that I've had for about 5 months now. My girlfriend and I drove up to New Hampshire last summer and got fitted. She's an avid hiker, and I mostly just spend a lot of time in the woods, building and maintaining trails, and walking my dog. I'm pretty happy with the boots so far. The only real negative I can see is the weight, and you do feel it on longer hikes. They definitely fit differently than what I've been used to. The toebox is huge and wide, not a lot of arch support. Kind of the opposite of 55 lasted PNW boots that I often wear. I find them very comfortable out in the woods though, and very stable. They've been waterproof as well, I haven't treated them with anything yet.

If you can, go there and get fitted. I'd have gone with a 10.5 D, like most of my other boots, but in Limmer sizing I needed an 11 EE. And while we both went with standard(non custom) sizing, the boots took about 6 months. It's also a beautiful area, worth visiting if possible.
I'm not too worried about a heavy boot or stiff sole. Having worn Whites, Wesco and Viberg for years has prepared me for this, haha. I'm glad to hear the toe box is wide. Unfortunately a trip to NH is not in the cards for me right now, so it'll likely be email correspondence for me. Hopefully I can go with a stock wide size. I'm usually 13 in most sneakers and a "12" in boots but I think I could do with a 12.5 or maybe even a 13 in certain styles. Thanks for sharing your experience.
 

Schambach

Practically Family
Messages
518
Location
Ithaca, NY
I'm not too worried about a heavy boot or stiff sole. Having worn Whites, Wesco and Viberg for years has prepared me for this, haha. I'm glad to hear the toe box is wide. Unfortunately a trip to NH is not in the cards for me right now, so it'll likely be email correspondence for me. Hopefully I can go with a stock wide size. I'm usually 13 in most sneakers and a "12" in boots but I think I could do with a 12.5 or maybe even a 13 in certain styles. Thanks for sharing your experience.
I've really only noticed the weight on longer hikes, with a lot of elevation changes. But, I thought the exact same thing you did, having worn PNW boots for quite some time. If your experience is like mine I bet you'll end up with a wide 13.

Also, do note that there are two different types of Limmer boots available. The ones built at ths shop in New Hampshire, and those built for them by Meindl in Germany. My experience is with the non custom, US made boots. Though I'm sure the Meindl boots are nice as well.
 
Last edited:

Observe

One Too Many
Messages
1,061
I've really only noticed the weight on longer hikes, with a lot of elevation changes. But, I thought the exact same thing you did, having worn PNW boots for quite some time. If your experience is like mine I bet you'll end up with a wide 13.

Also, do note that there are two different types of Limmer boots available. The ones built at ths shop in New Hampshire, and those built for them by Meindl in Germany. My experience is with the non custom, US made boots. Though I'm sure the Meindl boots are nice as well.
I actually have a pair of Meindl military surplus boots en route to me via ebay. Meindl has a good reputation for quality.
 

Bfd70

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,069
Location
Traverse city
I've been leaning more towards practical outdoor clothing and footwear for the last few months. I've avoided going full "gorpcore", instead opting for a blend of traditional and modern fabrics and styles. I've particularly been focused on boots, which have always given me trouble in terms of fitting due to my wide forefoot, low instep and narrow ankle. My toes are almost always squat in the toe box and my heel is almost always slipping in the back. I've tried a range of modern hiking boot styles from brands such as Lowa, Hanwag, Crispi and other brands that would not be of any interest to TFL. However, I have been eyeing a more traditional leather hiking boot from Limmer Boots, a New England based company with over a hundred years of being in business. I was wondering if anyone here had experience with this company and could share their experiences if so. I intend to send them an email this week regarding the fit of their boots to see if they'd work for my finicky feet. I'd likely go for their "standard" model, as seen in the following link and picture: https://limmerboots.com/products/the-standard View attachment 613668
Any other general experiences or advice with traditional style hiking boots would also be appreciated!
1. Who told you about gorp?
2. What country are you in?
3. It seems you’re choosing niche brands. Any reason?
4. Scarpa, Russel moccasin?
 

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