Want to buy or sell something? Check the classifieds
  • The Fedora Lounge is supported in part by commission earning affiliate links sitewide. Please support us by using them. You may learn more here.

How would goatskin/capeskin work on something like the Aero Hooch Hauler?

phario

New in Town
Messages
23
I'm interested in picking up a lighter but still durable leather jacket, and I've been hemming and hawing at the Aero Hooch Hauler. Rather than a thicker leather, I'd like a thinner leather that would be more versatile in UK weather.

Do any of you have any thoughts on goatskin on jackets like the Hooch Hauler that might be more designed for thicker leathers?

Here is a video on a Bill Kelso Duke in capeskin and I couldn't help but notice that it just didn't look as nice as for a thicker leather due to the floppy lapels.

I'd appreciate any photos you might have of jackets with similar lapels in a thin leather.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,899
Location
London, UK
Aero's goat would be an excellent hide for that sort of design (and probably closer the sort of heft 30s-50s originals were made from than a hefty steer or horse). Capeskin I suspect would be just a little too lacking in boy to look quite right - I think that's why Wested's copy of the Aero jacket made for the Captain America film doesn't look quite right in their website photos.
 

phario

New in Town
Messages
23
People need to stop mentioning goat in the same breath as lambskin/capeskin…
Sorry. I don’t know much about these leathers. Can you explain what you mean by this comment? Why can’t they be mentioned together?
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,713
Sorry. I don’t know much about these leathers. Can you explain what you mean by this comment? Why can’t they be mentioned together?

The only thing they have in common is that they are relatively soft and pliable. People take this to mean they're similar, but far from it.

Lambskin and sheepskin (including capeskin) are nice drapey garment leathers, but they offer little in the way of weather protection, let alone abrasion resistance.

Goatskin is tougher than many of the thickest, stiffest cowhides and horsehides on the market. It is probably most similar to kangaroo leather in its combination of flexibility and strength.
 

phario

New in Town
Messages
23
The only thing they have in common is that they are relatively soft and pliable. People take this to mean they're similar, but far from it.

Lambskin and sheepskin (including capeskin) are nice drapey garment leathers, but they offer little in the way of weather protection, let alone abrasion resistance.

Goatskin is tougher than many of the thickest, stiffest cowhides and horsehides on the market. It is probably most similar to kangaroo leather in its combination of flexibility and strength.
Thanks for clarifying. I was indeed looking for something that was light and durable.
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,713
Thanks for clarifying. I was indeed looking for something that was light and durable.

I'd add that good goatskin, and Aero's is amazing, has a really luxurious feel to wear. It's substantial, yet light. Hard to describe until you've handled it.
 

phario

New in Town
Messages
23
I'd add that good goatskin, and Aero's is amazing, has a really luxurious feel to wear. It's substantial, yet light. Hard to describe until you've handled it.
I did get a sample from Aero.

It’s nice. It feels like lambskin in softness and pliability. But it’s pebbled. If the samples I got, the russet goatskin has a similar but smaller pebbling to the Vicenza horsehide russet but without the nicer varied grain.

I also did a scratch test with my fingers to see how the leathers would stand up to abrasion.

All the steerhides and horsehides showed visible damage, with the worst ones the more dyed (Vicenza cordovan and baladassi tobacco). The shiny baladassi steer hide in russet also did not stand up well to my finger nail.

The Vicenza horsehide in russet did well.

Almost no marks on the goatskin! Despite lots of scratching you would have to really look closely to see where I did it.

That said, some wear is nice on leather, so I’m considering that as well.
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,713
All the steerhides and horsehides showed visible damage, with the worst ones the more dyed (Vicenza cordovan and baladassi tobacco). The shiny baladassi steer hide in russet also did not stand up well to my finger nail.

That's not damage. It's pull-up.
 

Aloysius

My Mail is Forwarded Here
Messages
3,713
Again I’m ignorant about these things. What constitutes damage? Can you scratch leather?

From this https://www.lederpflege.de/en/Pull-up-leather#:~:text=A characteristic of pull-up,leather develops an attractive patina.

I guess what I’m about as damage is just a surface coating that can be repolished or dyed.

So how do you properly test leather abrasion resistance?

Pull up is basically the oils within the leather moving around, not the leather disintegrating.

Abrasion resistance wise, roughly speaking, kangaroo is tops, followed by goat, followed by horse, followed by cow. But the specific hide makes a big difference too. A racing suit quality cowhide like Vanson's comp weight is going to be tougher than most anything including goat and horse.
 

phario

New in Town
Messages
23
Pull up is basically the oils within the leather moving around, not the leather disintegrating.

Abrasion resistance wise, roughly speaking, kangaroo is tops, followed by goat, followed by horse, followed by cow. But the specific hide makes a big difference too. A racing suit quality cowhide like Vanson's comp weight is going to be tougher than most anything including goat and horse.
I see.

So when people talk about goathide’s ability to look new after many years, what physical property of the leather, specially, is being discussed?
 

dudewuttheheck

I'll Lock Up
Messages
4,341
People need to stop mentioning goat in the same breath as lambskin/capeskin…
This. Goatskin would work great for the jacket and is actually 1930s appropriate (hooch hauler is a 1930s inspired design) but capeskin not so much. It could work, but its extremely different from goatskin. Goatskin is often fairly stiff and quite abrasion resistant. Capeskin is softer and not nearly as abrasion resistant.
 

Worf

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,183
Location
Troy, New York, USA
I've a GoodWear A1 in Capeskin. A bit of a "grail" jacket on here as I'm the 3rd owner and GW doesn't offer this particular hid any more. Does anyone offer Capeskin anymore? Cape is soooooft and pliable but not tough or durable. I limit my use of the jacket as I can feel the leather in elbows starting to thin. It is however the softest jacket I've ever owned. Never had any goat skin jackets... yet.

Worf
 

Forum statistics

Threads
107,886
Messages
3,049,292
Members
53,176
Latest member
hibarikyoya
Top