Patterns & Paper Ephemera Storage

Discussion in 'The Powder Room' started by Tinseltown, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. Tinseltown

    Tinseltown A-List Customer

    Messages:
    403
    Location:
    Denmark
    I want to start collecting vintage magazines, patterns and fashion plates for my own enjoyment and as a resource if I decide to pursue a costume designer career.
    I'd like to get suggestions as to where/how to store those, and also my drawings (of costumes).
    Thanks ladies. :)
     
  2. Lady Day

    Lady Day I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
    9,083
    Location:
    Crummy town, USA
    If youre looking for archival storage, acid free everything! Most photo shops, heck, even comic book stores will have bags and backing boards that are archival. If you are storing patters, an interesting thing I found is to take the pattern OUT of its original packaging, cause that paper's treatment can sometimes damage the tissue pattern :eek: I know!

    But if its just out of harms was storing, you can get by with a big old plastic container and plastic baggies.

    LD

    *sorry no spell check, me no sleep yet :eek:
     
  3. ohairas

    ohairas Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,000
    Location:
    Missouri
    My favorites get framed and hung up. I have a portfolio of 6 signed sketches from Gone With the Wind by Walter Plunkett. These will be framed and hung on my staircase wall. But I also have other photos to replace them so they will not hang out all year long in the light.

    Besides the acid free papers and coverings, I would suggest looking for an old record cabinet with the thin shelving to store some of the mags.

    You may want to invest in, or have a cabinet made that resembles those office type cabs with a bunch of different cubbies. This way you can only stack so much on each shelf, as to not squash precious or fragile papers. I'm sorry I can't think of what they actually call them. Each cubby is only the size of a sheet of paper and about two inches or so tall. You see them in schools, churches, or perhaps printing companies.

    You might also like a barister bookcase so you can see in and keep dust out.

    Nikki
     
  4. Tinseltown

    Tinseltown A-List Customer

    Messages:
    403
    Location:
    Denmark
    Just to clarify.. I don't need furniture for the collectibles... but suggestions for cases, storing techniques etc.
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    As LD says, acid free comic-book bags and backing boards are the first step if you're planning on serious archival storage. But failing that, you can make do with by stacking them carefully on a shelf in a dark closet: light is the single biggest enemy of old paper, and the best way to keep them safe is to keep them in the dark. Keeping them away from circulating oxygen is also a good idea -- this is where the bags come in, but if you don't want to go that route, stacking them tightly in piles can help with preservation.
     
  6. PrettySquareGal

    PrettySquareGal I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,000
    Location:
    New England
    What is also very important is to have a climate controlled room with low humidity. I do all of the above suggestions and have a dehumidifier running in the summer.
     
  7. Novella

    Novella Practically Family

    Messages:
    532
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    I'm really terrible about my magazines/sheet music/etc. They're all vertically standing on a bookshelf in the plastic bags I bought them in (which probably aren't acid free) At least they're in a location that gets little light and has a pretty constant temperature. I see a summer project in my future though!

    I would imagine that laying magazines horizonally would probably be better than having them stand vertically on a bookshelf - is this true?

    Old photos I have sorted into very small groups in acid free paper hanging folders. If the photo is large or in delicate shape it gets it's own folder. Anyone know how well a system that is?
     
  8. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Lay them flat, in stacks -- it's much easier on the bindings than standing them upright, especially old square-bound magazines where the glue tends to fracture and crumble with age.

    Also, keep those stacks out of reach of cats. Felines for some reason find a big stack of old magazines a swell place to practice scratching...
     
  9. Lady Day

    Lady Day I'll Lock Up Bartender

    Messages:
    9,083
    Location:
    Crummy town, USA

    Oh no! You sound like you speak from experience :( (poor magazines).

    LD
     
  10. jitterbugdoll

    jitterbugdoll Call Me a Cab

    I keep my collection in acid free bags, laid flat in a cool, dark closet.
     
  11. Drappa

    Drappa One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,141
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Pattern storage

    So, as my collection is ever increasing, I was wondering how you ladies store your vintage patterns?
    I bought a few folders with clear inserts, so I can skim through and see them all, separated into dresses and skirts, etc. However, I find that not that many patterns fit into a medium sized folder, as they are quite bulky.
    Has anyone else discovered a good system they'd be willing to share?
     
  12. MariantheLibrarian

    MariantheLibrarian Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    It's not slim by any means, but I keep mine in a two-drawer filing cabinet separated into eras and (sometimes) countries in hanging file folders. The ones I use the most frequently are in a portable plastic file tote by my sewing machine.
     
  13. kamikat

    kamikat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,794
    Location:
    Maryland
    I bought pattern file boxes from Joann's, one for each major brand, plus one for the smaller brands like Anne Adams, Marian Martin, ect. Within the box, they are in numerical order. While I can barely remember where I keep my keys, I can generally remember which pattern is which brand, so finding a pattern isn't that difficult. My biggest problem is when I need something, but don't know what, ie I want to make a new dress but not sure which one. Then I have to look through all the boxes. The project that I'd like to do is to Xerox the illustration of each pattern and keep those in a 3-ring binder organized by garment type.
     
  14. Drappa

    Drappa One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,141
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Thanks ladies, some good ideas! I am thinking of banker's boxes for the moment, as I can't really buy any new furniture due to space, but I may go have a look at some in the next few days and report back.
     
  15. palespider

    palespider One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    145
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    smart way to store patterns?

    my collection of patterns are growing and no longer fit into my sewing basket, does anyone have a smart way of storing a growing collection of patterns with little to know space. I rent a bedroom so everything i own needs to fit in there. thoughts?
     
  16. crwritt

    crwritt One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,109
    Location:
    Falmouth ME
    If your patterns are regular sized commercial patterns, these are made for it.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Land-O-LakesGal

    Land-O-LakesGal Practically Family

    Messages:
    864
    Location:
    St Paul, Minnesota
  18. palespider

    palespider One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    145
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    thanks for the replies and this thread!
     

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