Questions About the United States Navy Peacoat

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Matt Jones, Aug 30, 2005.

  1. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    You are very fortunate to have found, not one, but two of the post war models in size 50. Odd there were no other bidders. Lounge member @Spoonbelly also fits in the big boy sizes. I think his are sizes 46 and 48.
     
  2. Bushwalker

    Bushwalker New in Town

    Messages:
    24
    Location:
    Far East Asia
    There is a size 42 USN reefer coat on ebay right now.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https://www.ebay.com.hk/ulk/itm/142706060135
     
  3. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    Two things immediately struck me about this listing. First she is listing it as a WWII coat. Well, it isn't. Clearly it is a c. 1950 peacoat, probably a 1953 peacoat. Secondly she says she estimates it as a 42 long. The tag clearly states that it is a size 42 with no indication that it is a long size. Not sure long sizes were even produced back then. When dealing with Bay sellers, buyers beware. But, all of that aside, it might be a very nice peacoat.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2018
  4. Atticus Finch

    Atticus Finch Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,713
    Location:
    Coastal North Carolina, USA
    Sad thing is, I lost some weight last year and now I’m back to being a size 46 or 48. I also have a 1978 coat in size 48. It’s serviceable...even though it fits a bit loosely...but it’s nowhere near as nice as my 1950s peacoats.

    AF
     
  5. w126c

    w126c New in Town

    Messages:
    38
    Location:
    Kansas
    The "Z" stitch.

    Regards, Screenshot_2018-03-03-12-46-40.png
     
  6. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    The question of why peacoats could be buttoned either to the left or the right on the pre 1966 coats has arisen in the past, but we have never had a completely satisfactory answer. Well, board member @SpeedRcrX has come up with what I think is the definitive answer. She posted in another thread in which the question was discussed. Below I have quoted her post in the other thread:

    I'm coming back to this thread because I may have some explanations about the buttons on both sides.
    The company Dalmard Marine, one of the older manufacturer still in activity in France (1922) used to make buttons on both sides on their peacoats (Cabans in French).
    It was to protect against the wind.
    When the sailors were on boat, they could button up on the right side or the left depending if the wind was coming from the port or starboard side.

    Edit: Apparently Dalmard is still making buttons on both side.

    https://www.dalmardmarine.com/en/

    Thank you @SpeedRcrX for posting this.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2018
    clarinetplayer likes this.
  7. Gamma68

    Gamma68 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,762
    Location:
    Detroit, MI
    I recently picked up a WWII peacoat with some lining tears at the collar.

    It needed dry cleaning, but due to some miscommunication at the dry cleaners, they never did the job.

    So I decided to clean it myself. I only lightly sprayed it in sections using a mix of water/Ivory soap, blotted it dry and allowed any damp areas to air dry. No sections were soaked or anything like that. The coat now feels much cleaner and smells lust musty.

    The coat seemed to fit nicely (snug but not uncomfortable) before the cleaning. However, it now feels very snug at the chest/waist. I took out my tape measure and was surprised to see the chest now measures 19.5" instead of the 20" pre-cleaning. It also looks like I lost about .5" in the sleeve length. I'm usually very particular about how I measure my coats/jackets and don't get odd variations like this over time.

    This might be an odd question, but is it possible that by hand-cleaning my coat, I inadvertently shrunk it slightly?

    This doesn't seem possible, because these coats were made to get wet in the elements. Or maybe I've gained some weight over the past few weeks?
     
  8. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    I wouldn't think what you did would cause the coat to shrink. And yes, the coats would frequently get wet. They offer rain protection in a light rain, but after a deluge, they will allow water to get inside.
     
  9. Gamma68

    Gamma68 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,762
    Location:
    Detroit, MI
    My measurements must've been off. Or it was all those hot dogs and burgers I've had at the family BBQs lately.
     
    clarinetplayer likes this.
  10. moehawk

    moehawk I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Northern California
    Hey all!
    Found a peacoat at a thrift store today, not sure if it's issue or civilian repro. My instinct says civilian. Definitely of more modern make. So, the question is, did Jay Dee Sportswear ever have a government contract?
    Thanks.
     
  11. moehawk

    moehawk I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Northern California
    Here's a pic of the label, inside of the inner pocket.

    [​IMG]

    Sorry for the bad pic.

    Powered by happy thoughts
     
    Michael A likes this.
  12. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    Yes, Jay Dee sportswear was a government contractor, and I think it still is. Have never seen that tag with the Jay Dee name on it on a peacoat, though.

    This is a legitimate Navy issue peacoat. Even though this is a pre 1980 coat, it is a Melton coat and not the Kersey wool shell that is so desirable. Notice the tag for the shell information.

    I would be interested in knowing if there is an insulated lining in the coat. It should be behind the standard rayon lining next to body of the wearer. It will be about 1/8" thick and noticeable to probing fingers
     
    moehawk likes this.
  13. moehawk

    moehawk I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Northern California
    Thanks for the info! Cool that it is a real one.
    Yes, it does have an insulated lining. It also has gold tone buttons. I did notice right away that the wool shell felt a lot different than my '66 Coast Guard peacoat. The tag just confirmed that it wasn't the better stuff. The fit also seems a little diferent than the older one too.
     
  14. Spoonbelly

    Spoonbelly One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    222
    Location:
    Dutchess Co. New York
    Peacoat - Was wondering - what year is the last Kersey. I thought that it was 1972? Also if I remember correctly the first few years of Melton coats were a dark blue color and not black? Do you know what year they started to make the coats in black Melton?
     
  15. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    The last year for the Kersey was 1979. Sterlingwear says the material color is actually a very dark blue and not black. It looks black to me. I just took one of my Melton coats outside in the sunlight. I can see no blue in the fabric.

    This particular coat is a 1980 Vi Mil, which was the name Sterlingwear used for its military contracts back then. As 1980 was the first year for the Melton fabric, this was one of the first peacoats produced using that fabric.

    So to answer your question as to the color, evidently the coats have appeared black from the beginning. I have another current issue Sterlingwear from the 90s that also appears black. But I bow to Sterlingwear's expertise in knowing the the color it uses in its garments. If it says blue, then blue it is.
     
  16. Doctor Damage

    Doctor Damage My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,133
    Location:
    Ontario
    No, you're right. There's no blue in it. Calling the cloth blue is just a historical legacy thing which shows up from time to time in clothing. The clothing industry is run through with weird terminology and labeling.
     
  17. moehawk

    moehawk I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Northern California
    Figured I'd post pics of the outside of the Jay Dee to go with the label shot.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Now to brush off all the fence dust...

    Powered by happy thoughts
     
  18. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    That is actually a Reefer, a peacoat once worn by officers. They can still wear them, as can Chiefs, but most wear the Bridgecoat, a longer version of the peacoat. The officers would have their rank on shoulder boards attached to the top of the shoulder on both the peacoat and the bridge coat. Golden colored buttons are used instead of the black fouled anchor buttons. Chiefs wear no rank on their bridge coats.

    There is no structural difference between the peacoat and the reefer.
     
    moehawk likes this.
  19. moehawk

    moehawk I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,005
    Location:
    Northern California
    Well, living in the Emerald Triangle, a Reefer sounds way cooler than a Peacoat... :D
    All kidding aside, thanks again for sharing that information. Just out of curiosity, were the reefers usually called peacoats on the tag like this one or should it have been labeled differently?
     
  20. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,615
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    The "reefer" would have the same tag as the peacoat. It is the same coat, except for the loops on the shoulders and the gold buttons. The clothing regulations refer to it as a reefer. I have no idea where or why it got that name.

    That is a nice coat; do it a favor and take it to the dry cleaners.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2018

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