Reproduction classic workwear

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Matt Deckard, Oct 20, 2004.

  1. Pinhead

    Pinhead One of the Regulars

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    Spivey
  2. Luxire

    Luxire Vendor

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    Location:
    Edison, NJ
    As some of the attacks are personal, let me clear a few things here:

    1. We are an American company, based in Edison NJ.

    2. We have our office and warehouse in NJ. A lot of our decision making happens in the NJ office.

    3. Most, I repeat MOST of our fabrics are made in Europe. We can buy cheaper fabric from China and India but refuse to do so.

    4. Most of our big brands manufacture in Asian countries, including India for different reasons. We do the same. Apple does the same. We are not Apple, but, just saying.

    5. For the record, we started by manufacturing in NJ but the only way to make that work was to import workers from Asia. We thus started manufacturing there. We hire some amazing skills in our facility that includes people from Germany, UK, US, India among other countries.

    6. Contrary to what some want to trash-talk, our edge is in manufacturing quality and ability. When we say that we can make it exactly, we are stressing on our ability to make it. It is always made for the individual, nothing is mass produced. The decision to commission a particular design is of the customer.
    Do feel free to go to our Affiliate thread and see some images of what we do and can do. Then just think about where else could you get such variety made. We have created a globally unique facility to produce some of the best clothing.

    7. So, my dear chest-beaters, leave your China made computers at home, please go and sit outside Target/Sears/Kohls/JCPenney/Macys/Microsoft/Apple with Placards, shout and cry loud. If you can make them mend their ways, we will be more than happy to follow.

    As someone mentioned above, $60 is too much for a work-shirt. Try getting one that is "Made in America", that too custom made for you.

    American manufacturing was murdered by our political class a few decades ago. We are not doing enough to revive it. It is not easy either with all the global free trade agreements in place.

    If manufacturing needs to be revived, the Government needs to encourage it, nurture it. One such application by us has been pending for 2 years now.

    That should not stop you from crying hoarse. So yes, please go on.
     
  3. Lefty

    Lefty I'll Lock Up

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    Right or wrong, here's how I've interpreted what I just read:

    We tried, we failed, so now we're part of the problem. All of you reading this sell out your values to save a few bucks with almost every purchase you make, so why not make that purchase from us. After all, the problem isn't us, it's you and the government.

    The sad truth:

    I agree.


    But I'm trying, Ringo. I'm trying real hard to be the shepherd.
     
  4. Luxire

    Luxire Vendor

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    98
    Location:
    Edison, NJ
    Then the efforts need to be in the right direction. Workwear has been reduced to just fashion. Their real usage in America has reduced to minimal.

    The fact is that we have only 2 options, but will quote a third too.

    Options:
    1. Bring in people from Asia and manufacture here.

    2. Manufacture in Asia and bring the goods here.

    ...and 3: Reduce taxes, drastically reduce cost of living, open low cost schools to train people to do "real" work, come out of the "elitist" mindset, learn the hard way, manufacture and sell, not only in America, but also to Asia.

    1 and 2 are not much different. With 2, the drain of our money outside of our land is much lower.

    For 3, I am proud to say, we tried. It is not easy though. There was a mindset in 2008, after Lehman crash, to rebuild America like it should have been rebuilt. It frittered away. We were happy printing currency to ward off the trouble. We are still happy doing the same.

    We need to take a long hard look at how we can get back to our days of glory.

    That, my dear friends, will bring back creativity to the world of workwear, which is the reason why we are having this discussion.
     
  5. bretron

    bretron Call Me a Cab

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    Speaking of creativity; how bout we get back to the discussion of the "grail" shirt? :p
     
  6. Pinhead

    Pinhead One of the Regulars

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    Spivey
    Not really. I'm a dirty boy. I work every day.

    All of your other three points are right on.

    I recently bought American made work jeans. I paid more. I can already tell they are worth it.

    I've bought (http://www.allamericanhats.com/) things to keep the sweat out of my face. And gloves. And boots.

    It can be done.

    (I once lost a job to NAFTA. Yes, I'm old.)
     
  7. Lefty

    Lefty I'll Lock Up

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    I disagree that there's a lack of creativity here. In fact, I'd argue that in terms of workwear and the like, there's incredible growth in interest, design, and production of quality goods. Many of the links I provided were to makers who have only opened up their shops/sites within the past couple of years, while others are for businesses who have seen a renewed demand for their goods. Interest and creativity are here - how could you possible argue otherwise while running a site that offers workwear based upon the sale custom designs, marketed to a site of fetishists?

    In addition to the new interest, there's some infrastructure here. While everyone is going crazy for Cone denim as though the doors were just reopened, Cone really has little to offer. Of course, the US has had a lack of interest in paying more for an original first world product. As interest in denim grows, Cone could begin to produce more than just the handful of varieties ordered by their current customers and begin to produce many of the textiles they once made and maybe develop something new. In fact, on a very small scale, this has already begun (see, e.g., Roy).

    That might sound far-fetched on a larger level, but Horween's recent explosion in popularity illustrates that it's certainly possible. A decade ago, I'd venture to say that almost no one who now owns or lusts after many of the
    shoes or boots from White's, Russell, Oak Street, Alden, Viberg, and many other high-quality, first world shoemakers,
    belts or wallets from Hollow's, Makr, Ashland, Tanner, Unlucky and most of the other high-quality, first world leathercrafters,
    had ever heard of Horween, and could not have heard of many of the makers above, as they were not producing goods for sale a decade ago.

    A decade ago, you could not have convinced me that I'd own a couple of belts that cost over $100, and I'd own a boots that cost more than a month's rent. I'm sure this sort of story is true of everyone on this site who owns a nice hat, leather jacket, or jeans.

    Somewhere along the way, interests were sparked. Instead of the cheap leather goods most of us had been buying, we learned about what makes for better leather and leather goods. Those with a new interest and ability to do so picked up their tools and made new products. Those with established businesses took note of the interest and started promoting their Horween made goods. The creativity and the competition led to a desire for new materials from Horween, who recognized the resurgence in interest and responded incredibly well. A google search for Horween leather will now yield an overwhelming result of makers, from the individual new to the trade to the more-than-century-old shoe company, most of whom are selling US made goods in a now wonderful variety of Horween leathers.

    We do it for boots, we do it for jackets, and we do it for jeans. There's no reason that we can't have more high-quality, US made goods.
    The creativity and interest are there.
    The established companies and the new makers are designing, manufacturing, and selling these goods right now.
    We've just got to stop buying third-world-made knock-offs and supporting those who do it right.
     
  8. bretron

    bretron Call Me a Cab

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    We do it for shirts too for sure. I long for one of Russell's shirts, but I can pretty much only hope to get a used one. Now, I know for sure they're worth $250+, but my problem with spending more than say $150 (tops) on a shirt is that I'll just end up pitting it out after about two years. Whereas with a jacket boots or denim they just get better...

    I hear ya loud and clear, Lefty. But I'd argue you're mostly preaching to the choir. The rest of us just aren't so obnoxious :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2013
  9. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Yes, please. I liked your list. I will add some sears and Monty ward scans to the other thread soon.

    The discussion didn't even touch the point I tried to make. *Sigh*
    It would be the same if the designer/brand of the shown Wabash shirt would be from India himself. But the idea that design is protect worthy seems to be alien to the interwebs society. I'm out of this.
     
  10. simonc

    simonc Practically Family

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    I've got no time for tears in beers. I'm going over to their page to discuss what I'm doing there, please join me.
     
  11. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne My Mail is Forwarded Here

  12. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Bruce Wayne, I did send you a bat sign...uhm private message. I think for the price you might try Natty shirts and their "denim chino" fabric, soft collar, breast pockets...

    I would add a pullover style like the older work shirts. Maybe try one with a zipper instead of buttons too? What do you think?
     
  13. flat-top

    flat-top My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. bretron

    bretron Call Me a Cab

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    Those are the yokes I'm talking about!!
     
  15. Boyo

    Boyo One Too Many

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    Long Island NY
    LVC sale on vente privee tomorrow at 10:00 am.. Just saying.

    If you still need to sign up for Vente Privee, use this link ( I get a $20 credit for all who sign up)

    http://vpusa.com/wKxSHdQ
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  16. Bruce Wayne

    Bruce Wayne My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I received it but I was having trouble sending messages.

    It is indeed what I am looking for.

    Thanx!!!
    Charlie
     
  17. The Wiser Hatter

    The Wiser Hatter I'll Lock Up

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    Louisville, Ky

    thanks I always miss out
     
  18. flat-top

    flat-top My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I just went CRAZY on vente privee!!!! I scored a 1930's leather jacket!
    This one:
    [​IMG]
    And other amazing goodies. Man was that nerve wracking!
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  19. Boyo

    Boyo One Too Many

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    Location:
    Long Island NY
    ^^Congrats on the Leather Jacket.. those went fast... I grabbed two 1930's Sunset shirts... I was a bit disappointed in the jeans seemed like everything was pre-rinsed... great prices though..
     
  20. flat-top

    flat-top My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    It seemed like all the same jeans as last time (?) I got a mackinaw too, that I do NOT need but I couldn't stop myself. The gingham shirt, suspenders and a belt.
    Yeah man, geting a leather jacket (which I hope to actually recieve!) is pretty killer! I was hoping for the classic Menlo, but this one will do :)
     

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