Show Us Your OVERCOATS

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Marc Chevalier, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. Doublegun

    Doublegun Practically Family

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    I am sure this one has probably been ask before but what are the details on the navy window pain Depp wore in Public Enemies? I really have a jones for that coat.

    DG
     
  2. Dinerman

    Dinerman Super Moderator Bartender

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    There you go.

    [​IMG]

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  3. thunderw21

    thunderw21 I'll Lock Up

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  4. Ghostsoldier

    Ghostsoldier Call Me a Cab

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  5. Ghostsoldier

    Ghostsoldier Call Me a Cab

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    You might check with Ardis Taylor, who worked with Colleen Atwood to supply some of the vintage clothing for Public Enemies (among others):

    http://www.contracostatimes.com/ci_12713970?nclick_check=1

    Let us know if you get any scoop on it....;)
    Rob
     
  6. Forgotten Man

    Forgotten Man One Too Many

    Taken a few years ago at an event... a dance around Santa Fe 3751!

    [​IMG]

    The coat is dated 1938 and came from Winnipeg Canada! Where they know what cold is! This coat kept me warm for most of my stay in the north! The tough Canadian wind couldn't cut through that thing!

    It's one of my favorite coats... when the weather cools down and I pull out some of my other coats from summer storage, I'll post more photos.
     
  7. Doublegun

    Doublegun Practically Family

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    Rob,

    Thanks for the link. Unfortunately it does not work. Is there another?

    Thanks

    Doublegun
     
  8. Ghostsoldier

    Ghostsoldier Call Me a Cab

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    Dg...the link works for me, but here's the info:

    Oakland man clothing consultant for 'Public Enemies'
    By Joseph Natividad - Contra Costa Times

    Suiting up the likes of Ray Charles and John Dillinger for the big screen isn't your average day job.

    But that's just half of what Ardis Taylor does for a living.

    For almost three decades, the Oakland native has been running his own business in Alameda called Vintage Apparel by Ardis while consulting and supplying costumes for Hollywood period films such as "Ray," "Public Enemies" and "American Gangster."

    For "Public Enemies," which opens today, Taylor worked with Oscar-winning costume designer Colleen Atwood in outfitting the film's principal actors with 15 suits and pairs of shoes, five topcoats and several accessories from that time period. He received no information as to who would wear his clothing, but did find out that actor Johnny Depp is a size 40 regular.

    "A lot of times the designer has an unlimited budget, and they're more open so that you could bring out your best," Taylor says. "She (Atwood) made her selections, but I didn't know where they were going to go, but I could tell from the way that she responded that I had what she wanted."

    Taylor owns suits, hats, shoes and accessories that date back from the 1930s through the mid-1960s. He restores vintage menswear through contacts with various specialized dealers at trade shows, antique shows and malls. Taylor also draws from his client's list or referrals.

    He has met a number of film people through his shows or via word of mouth. One of his first forays as a Hollywood clothing consultant came in 1994, supplying a couple pairs of shoes for the Coen brothers film "The Hudsucker Proxy." Taylor says that his work on smaller scale projects has allowed his business and reputation to grow as a specialist in vintage footwear.
    "People who like my concept of the business or my approach to it refer these people to me," Taylor says. "For 'Public Enemies' we did this work in January of 2008. Whoever I deal with, I try to be as professional as I can, whether it's on a base level or Atwood's level."

    Taylor's knowledge on fashion is a result from years of research and experience. He is known for his knowledge and collection of rare leather shoes (he has close to 175 pair). Restoring vintage pieces goes hand-in-hand with an attention to detail, and in some cases he has had to restore fabric that has been moth-eaten or ripped on the lining as a result of bad alterations.


    Unique fashion era

    "The '30s are the most rare, especially for menswear," Taylor says. "'Public Enemies' was from around that era. It's the hardest to locate because a lot of people within the business don't know much about the fashion at all," he says. "Within the '30s, I like the textures of fabric — the herringbone tweeds and the chalk stripes they had in that period."

    As a high school student growing up in the 1960s, Taylor admired men who dressed well and shopped at places like Oakland's Rogers Clothing Store and Mr. Yanci's Clothes Hanger, where it was common to find athletes and celebrities walking through the aisles. Though he had to place items he wanted on layaway when he frequented these shops, it would nurture a hobby that would later turn into his profession.

    When discussing men's and women's fashion, Taylor likes to emphasize the ability to individualize or make an outfit your own. He stresses that it is more important to be able to put together an outfit that highlights your personal features over how much you spend on a piece of clothing.

    Taylor continues to travel throughout California and the Pacific Northwest, searching for tattered suits and worn-out leather shoes which he will eventually restore into something special for his growing list of clients.

    "It's not so much about the next film," Taylor says. "You have to really have a vision of what may evolve before it happens. I'll probably be doing this for the rest of my life."

    Reach Joseph Natividad at jnatividad@bayareanews group.com.

    Hope that helps. :)
    Rob
     
  9. Doublegun

    Doublegun Practically Family

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    Thanks, Rob. I called Mr. Taylor and left a message. I'll post what I find out but I doubt that he happens to have an identical coat in a 46L laying around.

    Cheers.
     
  10. Dinerman

    Dinerman Super Moderator Bartender

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    It also says Mr. C.D. Sargent.
     
  11. thunderw21

    thunderw21 I'll Lock Up

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    Found this East German overcoat at Goodwill today. Don't know if I'm going to keep it or not. If I do the buttons are going to be replaced. Very heavy, a lot nicer than I would have expected.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Ghostsoldier

    Ghostsoldier Call Me a Cab

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    I've got an East German (GDR/DDR) version, but I don't like the contrasting collar....
    Rob
     
  13. Forgotten Man

    Forgotten Man One Too Many

    Well, it's a German coat... Those coats are the grand children of WWII styling. And the quality hasn't changed much at all since then. Even if the callers weren’t contrasting, the overall color shouts German military.

    Find a good period civilian top coat and let the East German job "dangle".
     
  14. Chrome

    Chrome One of the Regulars

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    I really like those gone german coats :) cheap and scream vintage. I paid 5 Euros from mine (7 bucks) and was awesome to see full rack of those. Below was rack of east german tunics and pants.
     
  15. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    I'm a fan of that look too. Recently took delivery of one from eBay, bought itg for about GBP15. It was selling as a "WW2 repro" - I don't know enough about the differences and models to be sure if it is or if it's one of the later ones, but I don't care.... I like the styling and that's good enough for me. I don't expect to be mistaken for Wehrmacht any time soon..... probably less likely than another coat i own - most folks' reaction to my black leather trenchcoat seems to be distinctly rooted in Gestapo stereotypes. :rolleyes:

    I have also recently taken delivery of what I believe to be a 30s original herringbone tweed, heavy polocoat - not unlik the one at the top of this thread, though mine is not Donegal Tweed, lacking the random flcks of other colours through the borwn and cream. Very excited with this one - I am looking forward to wearing it this Winter. Also have a couple of fifties overcoats - not in mind condition; tidy enough, with minor moth damage repaired, to wear regularly and not worry about. A few others... must get photos when I can lay hands on a willing photographer-accomplice! I do have a 70s era RAF Seargeants' coat, which I think I will part with - hoping to eventually find one in WW2 or immediate post war period pattern (surprisingly, nobody in the reenactor market seems to produce these; does everybody who does RAF impressions only wear Irvins and Service Dress??); I also have my eye on a Swedish Air Force coat. And the rest.....

    I must also get some photos of my recently acquired, new and unissued Guards Regiment greatcoat. Really sharp style; I plan to add a set of civilian buttons to it.
     
  16. Ghostsoldier

    Ghostsoldier Call Me a Cab

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  17. J.J. Gittes

    J.J. Gittes A-List Customer

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    Haha, Dinerman got you Binkie.
    I guess MR C.D. Sargent was a cross-dresser. lol
     
  18. Forgotten Man

    Forgotten Man One Too Many

    Scream vintage? Nah, they scream BRING DOWN THE WALL!!! lol

    Seriously, they are well made, have a sharp look but, when it comes to pulling of a period look, if one of those are worn with a fedora you'll give the wrong impression I'm sure. They're just a bit too military for a good civilian impression.
     
  19. I agree with you, Forgotten Man.

    .
     

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