Show us your vintage home!

Discussion in 'Your Vintage Home' started by LolitaHaze, Jun 13, 2006.

  1. Mike in Seattle

    Mike in Seattle My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,027
    Location:
    Renton (Seattle), WA
    Since you ask...I really like the combination. I like how you're using the breadbox as the basis for the kitchen color scheme and accessories. But my head's telling me "Valance too long - curtains too short!"

    What *I* would probably do is take up the valance since it's long. I realize that's to partially mask that the curtains are short. I'd also take up the curtains to shorten them and move the curtain rod down parallel with the bottom half of the window, so the curtain bottom hangs down a little below the sash.

    Then you've got a section of window between valance & curtain to look out or at least let light in while you're working at the sink. At least I *think* that where the sink was in the "before" photo.

    Edit: Hey - what does the valance material look like on the backside? If it's lighter, you might try flipping the valance - it might be a closer match to the breadbox. Just a thought.
     
  2. dhermann1

    dhermann1 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    9,158
    Location:
    Da Bronx, NY, USA
    I wound up just using the two feedsacks, tied back. It's another half finished project at this point. They're tied back with twine, which is scotch taped to the side of the window. It looks pretty decent, actually. But I have to re-sew the curtains to get a little more length out of them, and figure out how to make a real tie back of some sort. I'm reminded of a country song I heard recently, "This place could use a woman's touch." lol
    My next issue with the kitchen is whether to paint the cabinets white. I think I will, but at this point I have NO gumption for it.
     
  3. BeBopBaby

    BeBopBaby One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,176
    Location:
    The Rust Belt
    Use a color-coordinated length of ribbon and a thumbtack. No sew, easy to do.
     
  4. HarpPlayerGene

    HarpPlayerGene I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,682
    Location:
    North Central Florida
    Y'know, here in Florida - especially over the last decade - we see our share of developing going on. Most of the time, when I hear someone lament, "Oh my God, they tore up a perfectly good overgrown pasture and put HOUSES on it!!", it doesn't impress me because I, personally like to see human progress and nice homes built in which people can reside. Some developers here have gone to lengths to really put some style in to their projects. And to those college kids who seem to honestly believe that our entire country is paved over and nary a tree or blade of grass is left standing, I suggest they take a coast to coast flight with a window seat.

    HOWEVER, when I hear of old homes being torn down to build new ones, I cringe in likely much the same way the pasture lovers do. I live in an 1883 home and cannot imagine ever wanting to live in a new one. These oldies have soul and it is sad when they are toppled before their time.
     
  5. MadelienneBlack

    MadelienneBlack One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    107
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I might mention that it's not just college kids who think that, though.

    You're right, there is nothing wrong with human progress and I believe it should be encouraged wholeheartedly. But I believe that progress should be just that, progressive. It's difficult to find good craftmenship anymore. I feel like the homes now would fall over if you blew too hard. I find no beauty in 18 houses that look alike stacked right next to each other. I also find it appauling that you have to start looking into a new roof or new windows after living there for five years or less, even. Quantity over quality seems to be the name of the game.

    Along that same note however, not all those "mourning the pastures" are sad because they lost a little grass. I've heard my own father complain about the large cookie-cutter mansions that replaced the woods he used to play in plus his childhood home and the street he learned to drive a car on. It's more a nostalgia thing I think.

    However, I will add that since those cheap, obnoxious houses have been built overtop of what used to be wooded areas there has been a huge number of now-homeless deer running in front of cars causing some not-so-pretty accidents. Whether you feel bad for the dead animal or the wrecked Ferrari, you've got to admit if there wasn't a house there, someone or something might be better off.

    Ps. A coast to coast flight would be lovely, provided they start handing them out for free anytime soon. Until then, I guess I'll just lament the lost grass.
     
  6. kampkatz

    kampkatz Practically Family

    Messages:
    715
    Location:
    Central Pennsylvania
    MBlack

    I see that you are in Pennsylvania. There is much more rural acreage in the commonwealth than there are paved over lots and cheap developments. Wild life have always wandered onto roads that cut through their habitat and sadly, there is too much road-kill even in this more rural part of the state, Most home building here has some quality to it, although there are still cheaper dwellings, as there will always be.
     
  7. John K Stetson

    John K Stetson One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    philadelphia
    Perhaps it depends on the setting. There's been a lot of development in my part of Pennsylvania, including a couple of "neo-traditional" attempts. Reasonably sized single family homes, and townhouses (grouped in threes) whose facades are different but clearly relate to each other (in addition there are services and shops within the development, to encourage walking or biking). I have to admit the streetscape leaves me a little cold.

    However I just returned from a trip to London and Bath. The streetscapes there (London: South Kensington and Notting Hill; Bath:almost everywhere) could not have been more harmonious. Whether it was the 18th century architecture or the materials - or both - there was a nice feeling imparted the porticoes, steps, columns, pilasters, etc.

    http://www.terragalleria.com/europe/united-kingdom/bath/picture.uken35917.html
     
  8. John K Stetson

    John K Stetson One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    philadelphia
    Surely nostalgia is part of it. However much of the current development (at least in SE Pennsylvania) is consuming some of the most fertile farmland around. Houses can be built almost anywhere, but food can't be grown almost anywhere - at least, not sustainably. The neo-traditional developments I mentioned earlier try to preserve some farmland, open and wooded space by building fewer homes on smaller lots - preserving a lot of developer's land. It's a start...
     
  9. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,248
    Location:
    Gopher Prairie, MI
    Here are pictures of my 1889 vintage carriage house (which contained much of the radio and phonograph collection) ABLAZE last Saturday.

    [​IMG]

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    AND THE RESULTS:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The building and the contents are a total loss, I'm afraid.
     
  10. lazydaisyltd

    lazydaisyltd One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    123
    Location:
    Southern Middle Tennessee
    How awful...I'm so sorry! :eek:
     
  11. MaryDeluxe

    MaryDeluxe Practically Family

    Messages:
    794
    Location:
    Deluxeville!
    That would have to be my worst nightmare! :eek:
     
  12. goldwyn girl

    goldwyn girl One Too Many

    vitanola, I'm so sorry to see this
     
  13. $ally

    $ally One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,276
    Location:
    AZ, USA
    Oh my gosh that's horrible! Insurance, I hope? Not that it can replace your hard work, but it helps with everything else. Is there anything I (or we at FL) can do to help you?
    Your memories are always in your heart though.
     
  14. "Skeet" McD

    "Skeet" McD Practically Family

    Messages:
    756
    Location:
    Essex Co., Mass'tts
    There are no words....

    Friend Vitanola,
    What can one say at a time like this? For all of us who are "thing" people--those for whom the physical remains of the past serve as transmitters of the zeitgeist and ethos in which they were born--this is close to a worst nightmare.

    The knowledge and interest you have weren't destroyed, and I'm sure you'll pick up the pieces and go on. Thank you for sharing those things with us, and I look forward to your future contributions.

    With very sincere and deep condolences,
    "Skeet"
     
  15. Jedburgh OSS

    Jedburgh OSS One of the Regulars

    What a devastating loss

    Very sorry you had to experience this. The only thing recognizable is the monitor top fridge.
     
  16. epr25

    epr25 Practically Family

    Messages:
    622
    Location:
    fort wayne indiana
    My God my heart is breaking for you!
     
  17. Foofoogal

    Foofoogal Banned

    Messages:
    4,891
    Location:
    Vintage Land
    My prayers are with you on all of this. So very sad. I am so sorry.
     
  18. fortworthgal

    fortworthgal Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,646
    Location:
    Panther City
    Oh dear, what a loss, vitanola!!! Seeing your photos made me very sad.

    We're still working on redecorating our 1958 ranch home. I'll try to grab some pictures this weekend. We are fairly lucky in that our home was somewhat remodeled in the early 90s by the 2nd owners, but many of the original touches remain - original doorknobs & many fixtures, some original kitchen fixtures (built-in blender and vent-a-hood), NuTone house radio & intercom system, recessed can lighting, laminate cabinets with black lacquer & chrome handles, original blue & apricot tiled bathrooms. I'm trying not to go for the extreme kitsch 50s look with all Coca-Cola & cherry motifs, formica & mid-century modern (not that I don't LOVE that), but we're aiming for more of a 1950s traditional style. A mix of modern pieces with some western/colonial thrown in. My line of thinking is that a lot of families wouldn't have had all brand new 1955 Danish modern furniture, they would have had a mix of pieces and styles. Colonial style was still pretty huge in the 1950s (even into the early 60s) so we're kind of leaning that direction.

    My goal is to have kind of a "Don and Betty Draper" house that is typical of what a suburban late 50s/early 60s family would have lived in daily.
     
  19. Lorena B

    Lorena B Practically Family

    Messages:
    566
    Location:
    London, UK
    Vitanola, I am really sorry for your loss. That is heartbreaking. I hope you can get back to your life real soon. So sad!
     
  20. airgrabber666

    airgrabber666 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    105
    Location:
    Bridgeton, NJ
    You can use photobucket to perform all kinds of cool effects with your pictures. One allows you to make "vintage"-look photographs. Here's my house with the special effects:[​IMG]

    Or "blueprint" it![​IMG]:

    Sepia:[​IMG]
     

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