" The Great British Hat Makers "

Discussion in 'Hats' started by Chepstow, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. Tukwila, PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  2. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    Two very nice finds, Panos. Love those old photos, too.

     
    PanosChris likes this.
  3. steur

    steur

    Messages:
    13,537
    Location:
    Nederland
    Wow, two fabulous finds, Panos. Well worth picking these up. Excellent colours, shapes and conditions! I notced the blue one seems to have the brim curve running along the back of the hat as well.
     
    PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  4. PanosChris

    PanosChris Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Thanks Stefan, indeed the Glyn has a tighter curve that goes along the periphery, good eye ;)
    Thanks Bob, I'll do, along with some more ;)
    Thank you Steve, I love your castor Mossant btw !
     
    Steve1857 and BobHufford like this.
  5. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    Scott & Co Beaver blend fedora. Part of the recent Dutch haul. Hard to capture the wonderful dark blue colour on this one, so I've added some of Stefan's photos.

    Scott & Co called it St. James Blue (thankfully not St. James infirmary blue :)

    IMG_20210207_135452.jpg IMG_20210207_135500_1.jpg scott beaver_02.jpg scott beaver_07.jpg
     
  6. steur

    steur

    Messages:
    13,537
    Location:
    Nederland
    Such a beautiful hat and in a wonderful felt as well. Glad it found a good home.
     
    Steve1857 likes this.
  7. steur

    steur

    Messages:
    13,537
    Location:
    Nederland
    Woodrow Amylyte Burlington bowler in grey. The size is 58, but it runs smaller than that. Colour is called radium. Brim at just shy of 5cm and crown 12cm. Another very lightweight bowler hat at just 98 grams. Grey bowlers are difficult to come by, so a pity it's not my size. It's post-war because it mentions the queen. Pre-war would mention the king.


    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  8. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt Practically Family

    Messages:
    621
    Location:
    Germany
    Waited a long time for it - then finally arrived and still not posted for a long time:
    The black Henry Heath Homburg, which apparently wants to be or should be a tuxedo hat.
    Or maybe a Melone/Derby/Bowler, because that is the stiffest felt on a soft felt hat
    I have ever seen! o_O Even with steam, small bends were hard to tame!
    And at the same time, it's one of the smoothest and most supple felts I've had in my hands.
    Truly a high quality, premium hat as you would expect from this manufacturer.
    Must be before 1952: "By Special Appointment To His Majesty The King" - think of the 40s
    crown with 11 cm at the centre dent; 5,5 cm brim at the front & back; 5 cm crown ribbon
    size 7 1/4 (59cm) marked on the label - fits perfectly!

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    What makes it even more remarkable and, apart from the felt,
    makes it stand out from the big bunch of black homburgs:
    It has no sweat leather inside, but a reeded silk ribbon (5 cm)
    sewn in and stitched to the silk lining. What's more, this rep band
    doesn't feature Henry Heath's logo once again, but a stunning
    gold imprint of "Tress - Quality Hats - London" (Tress & Co).
    Actually, these were hat manufacturers themselves and thus
    a competitor of Heath, or were the latter once bought out by Tress?
    Otherwise it would be possible that Tress ordered this hat from Heath
    and then sold it themselves OR the grosgrain ribbon is an exchange?!
    In any case, this ribbon is exceptional and clearly gives this Homburg
    the touch of a tuxedo hat, which I have mentioned above.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    An excellent find, Matt. I'd say pre 40s. Didn't HH go out of business toward the end of the 1930s?

     
  10. PanosChris

    PanosChris Practically Family

    Messages:
    615
    Fantastic get Matt! It has a very attractive pre-war style for sure.
     
    Mean Eyed Matt and Steve1857 like this.
  11. mayserwegener

    mayserwegener

    Messages:
    15,631
    Location:
    Maryland
    Matt, Super + unique find! Congrats!
     
    PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  12. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt Practically Family

    Messages:
    621
    Location:
    Germany
    Thanks, Steve, Chris and Steve.
    I'm afraid I have so little idea about British hats and even less about Henry Heath.
    Do you have more information about it - I am grateful for any expansion of my knowledge.
    Here in the Threat I have (yet) found nothing...
    What are you thinking about this "sweat" with the Tress-logo?
     
    PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  13. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
     
  14. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    I think the Tress sweat is an addition at some point in the HH's life . I can't see it being original to the hat pre war.

     
    PanosChris likes this.
  15. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    The pleats around the liner and the liner logo, plus the wonderful art deco type skript on the label all point toward a pre war time frame.

     
    PanosChris likes this.
  16. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt Practically Family

    Messages:
    621
    Location:
    Germany
    Thanks again, Steve! And please don't get me wrong:
    I wouldn't be really mad at all if the hat would be prewar! ;)

    This liner logo from Heath is not the most common, but I've seen it several times
    - mostly on pre-war top hats, some even from the 20s. In contrast, I don't know
    this Tress logo at all: actually, they also had a similar crest with reference to royalty....
    But I also just saw a top hat made by J.S.Smith in Edinburgh, but has an imprint
    of Tress on the sweat - apparently they really bought other brands too.
     
    PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  17. Steve1857

    Steve1857 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,206
    Location:
    Denmark
    Matt, in my humble opinion, it's all about the time frame of Henry Heath Ltd, Homburgs of the period, and the King Georges. I'd put your HH Homburg at about 1936 and after, that is to say King George VI, but pre war.
    I'd place the Tress cross grain sweat as a new edition in the ca. 1950s. Not that that means it's a tuxedo hat.
    A tux evening wear hat of the 1950s would have had a cross grain ribbon rather than a sweat on the inside.

     
    Mean Eyed Matt and PanosChris like this.
  18. Rmccamey

    Rmccamey My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,422
    Location:
    Central Texas
    The Curzon is a real beauty, Panos.

     
    PanosChris likes this.
  19. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt Practically Family

    Messages:
    621
    Location:
    Germany

    Again, a big thanks to you, Steve, for your assessment,
    which is more sound than my gut feeling due to your vast experience.
    I also thought of this George - just a little later... :)
    But as I said: I love this fantastic new to me hat and
    I'm happy about the look and that it is even prewar!

    Just as an addendum in case I misspoke or just misunderstood it myself:
    I only put "sweat" in quotes to indicate this band as "at this position".
    It is not a real leather sweat but actually a grosgrain ribbon,
    which is made of silk with the dimensions of a crown ribbon.
     
    PanosChris and Steve1857 like this.
  20. steur

    steur

    Messages:
    13,537
    Location:
    Nederland
    Very nice, Matt. It has a great shape and I love the liner. The sweatband in grosgrain ribbon is odd, but not unheard of, but it is strange it carries the Tress name. Henry Heath was actually around longer than Tress. Tress was located on 3-7 Stamford Street, London (now the location of the Mad hatter Hotel) and sold to Christy's in 1953, while Henry Heath was located in Oxford Street, like it says on the liner, but they left that location in the early fifties, relocating to Brewer Street, London as a wholeseller. They finally closed in 1958. I believe the beavers that referred to the hat making process can still be seen on the Oxford Street building. Tress didn't buy out Henry Heath, but it is possible that Tress made the hat for Henry Heath, when the latter changes from a manufacturer to a wholeseller.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.