Ultimate Leather Conditioner Comparison (on Reddit)

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Monitor, Sep 20, 2020.

  1. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    I'm sure Pecards has other things in it, just commenting on the end result and the feel of the product. In Australia, thirty plus years ago, the leather jacket guys used to only use Joseph Luddy Dubbin on jackets - every 2 or 3 years you'd smear it on your jacket and hang it in the hot sunshine for the afternoon to soak in. This always worked fine for me. Pecards and other creams were not really known. The internet has helped turn everything into an art form.

    I personally don't think any of this stuff repairs damage - I think it may prevent further damage, but mainly it protects hide from water. This is more useful for saddles and things. The beautifying impact of dressing fades away.​
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  2. Are the ingredients listed on the Pecard container....or do they keep it a secret?
     
  3. Will Zach

    Will Zach One Too Many

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    Secret. But feels like Vaseline. The jacket is not greasy or even shiny after one more day. The appearance seems to be changing quite rapidly as the Pecards soaks in. As long as the leather remains supple long term, I'll be happy. It was extremely stiff and dry - the jacket is from 1940/50s.
     
  4. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    I wouldn't put Pecards on cracked lips. Keep us posted Will Zach I'd be interested how the jacket feels in 6 to 12 months without re-treatment.
     
  5. navetsea

    navetsea I'll Lock Up

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    they say you can with obenauf LP :D

    i find it while the appearance dulls out after awhile, but if there is some beeswax in the conditioner, you can re buff it into some sheen without adding more conditioner, pretty much the same with how I clean my boots, I wax them once, and I just buff it with microfiber rag everytime I wear until I accidentally kicked something and crack the wax badly, or the wax become too thin to make a sheen then I re waxed the toe and heel again abit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2020
  6. Will Zach

    Will Zach One Too Many

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    Will do. I am interested as well. I can say that an old cafe racer I drenched in Obenaufs oil 8 months ago is still extremely supple, and has not lightened up. Obenaufs oil has a mild smell, while Pecards is odorless. I'd be curious how the two compare at 12 months or longer.
     
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  7. Will Zach

    Will Zach One Too Many

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    Btw - lip balms are just petroleum distillates, like Pecards, lol.
     
    Monitor likes this.
  8. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    That's why I made the joke abut Pecards. :eek:
     
  9. navetsea

    navetsea I'll Lock Up

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    sometime they have turpentine and parafin, not sure if that can be used as lip balm, if only vaseline, beeswax, aloevera, coconut oil, then heck yeah I ll use it on chapped lips, and elbow
     
  10. handymike

    handymike I'll Lock Up

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    In my experience, the darkening caused by the Obenauf’s doesn’t lighten up with time. If you like that, it’s a great product. Looks fantastic on Redwing boots.
     
    Will Zach and navetsea like this.
  11. TooManyHatsOnlyOneHead

    TooManyHatsOnlyOneHead A-List Customer

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    I think I've read in multiple places that Pecards is basically vaseline with some other waxes/oils. I know on the Schott forums over the years, vaseline was generally considered a big no no, along with silicone. With vaseline, supposedly, it definitely softens, but breaks down the fibers of the leather, crushing them over time. And with silicone, it's blocking the pores, effectively suffocating the leather, or so they say. Mink oil was the only one somewhat "officially" recommended by a Schott staff person. Personally I don't like mink oil. Smell is a turn off for me.

    On the Schott website and in the stores, they started selling Otter wax products. I bought some thinking this would be officially sanctioned for the Schott line, but I'm not a big fan. Definitely leaves white residue and very tacky.

    I believe the people at horween recommend Venetian Shoe Cream for any of the CXL stuff, but I dont know if that's just for the shoe stuff. I've never tried on a jacket.

    The best stuff I've personally used if you don't mind your leather darkening a good couple shades is coconut oil. Smells good and really penetrates and nourishes. What it does long term to the leather, I don't know. But I've made my own mix of basically 50/50 coconut oil and beeswax. It's my go to for all the black stuff.

    My other go to is Smiths Leather Balm. Darkens just a touch, smells good (Cocoa butter), and seems to nourish well. If I recall, it's basically cocoa butter, almond oil and beeswax if I'm not mistaken (or maybe carnuba). I use this for the lighter shades of leather.

    But in reality, all my current jackets are pretty new, so I'm going to try and go a few years before I do anything to them. They don't get a hard life out here in sunny Los Angeles.

    Lastly, there's somewhat of a cult that swears by Lexol. Kind of makes sense if it's good at maintaining car leather that's in super hot conditions and potentially super cold conditions.
     
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  12. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    All of the above has been debunked here and other places. Mink oil is the only product I know that can rot stitching and ruin jackets. But some people have good results, they say.

    The conditioner world is full of dogma and personal testimonies that contradict, even cancel out each other.

    Of all the products I have used Lexol has provided the best results, but others will tell you that it is almost useless.
     
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  13. navetsea

    navetsea I'll Lock Up

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    I think pretty much like what we should and should not eat, if you google that up you'll be confused, I tend to believe conditioning with some oil as long as you don't over do it won't do harm whatever it is coconut, olive, mink, vaseline, some wallet maker say the oil transfer from your hand while handling the wallet is enough to feed the leather and everything eventually oxidated to rot and broken in the end

    the worn in patina, grains and characters we like to see is actually deterioration of the leather anyway, big chance we die first before our jackets deteriorate to the point its worn out. Unless you buy lambskin and wear it as daily beater.
     
  14. Will Zach

    Will Zach One Too Many

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    Yep, leather care world abounds in fables and fairy tales. Sometimes I wonder if certain manufacturers plant stories derogatory to competition, lol. The story that petroleum distillates damage leather fibers is complete nonsense. Petroleum distillates (like Vaseline) are chemically pretty inert, don't oxidize, and don't interact chemically with fibers. It is just inert lube, is all it is. It is "natural" waxes that are more likely to oxidize and cause damage to fibers, likely via impurities.
     
  15. JMax

    JMax I'll Lock Up

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    Save your money. Good product, but not what you are after. There was no lasting sheen. I may test it out some more on some bs jackets I have in a box.
     
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