What Was The Last Movie You Watched?

Discussion in 'The Moving Picture' started by Amy Jeanne, Aug 5, 2007.

  1. 3fingers

    3fingers One Too Many

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    Illinois
    I have to ask. Why would one go to a theater and choose a seat where your tiny magic box would see the whole screen and attempt to record a movie? I've seen people's recordings of clips from concerts they've been to. Barely intelligible sound and watching ants run around on stage. Pfft.
     
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  2. The Jackal

    The Jackal One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    210
    Most of the big movies get leaked online this way. I'm not real sure what the purpose of it is for the leaker, as there doesn't appear to be any monetary gain from doing it.

    However, I have watched a few movies this way over the years. I'm not proud of it or anything, but as a single father I've done it more than once to screen a movie to make sure it was ok to take my kids in instances when there was no way to get to the theatre without them.

    More often than not the screen and sound are plenty clear enough to enjoy the movie with no issue.

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
     
  3. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    A woman I worked with years ago had a brother (or maybe brother in law, I'm not sure anymore) who did it because he wanted to "stick it to the man and make information and art free" or something like that. She thought her brother was a jerk, but he put a lot of effort into putting movies up on the web for free with no compensation for himself. That's just an anecdote - I have no idea how much of that goes on or all the other reasons people might do what happened in Lizzie's theater.
     
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  4. scottyrocks

    scottyrocks I'll Lock Up

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    Wasn't the last movie I watched, but we saw John Wick (2014) and John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) on PPV last weekend.

    The first one was better. Quite unique way to tell a story of assassins and hitmen, even if it was bit reminiscent of The Matrix (1999), as far as the pacing, which was perfect, of the energy-packed action sequences of which there were many. It was dramatic enough with limited dialogue. What I particularly enjoyed was the lack of drawn out explanations and speeches just before a key killing. He just gets it done.

    Chapter 2 was almost as good, but not as cutting edge as the original.

    In both films, Ian McShane does a splendid job as Winston, the owner of a downtown NYC hotel that caters specifically to this type of clientele. Lance Reddick is Charon, the 'man at the front desk,' who sets the tone for the place before we even meet Winston.

    Laurence Fishburne makes an appearance in 2 as the Bowery King, and I couldn't help being reminded again of The Matrix trilogy, although the relationship between the two characters in each movie was different than the other. When I first saw Fishburne I smiled, as I enjoy seeing repairings of actors from movies in other projects.

    John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (2019) is just being released as we speak, and is a continuation of Chapter 2 that begins pretty much immediately after the end of that chapter. I will most likely wait for it on a home video venue as I pretty much despise going to the theater these days (my daughter wanted the three of us to see a new release last weekend, but tickets were $16 a piece, so that didn't make it any harder to say no).
     
  5. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    It's ridiculous, and the people doing it here are not kids -- it's Solid Citizen types in their sixties and seventies who supposedly "ought to know better" and clearly don't. Entitlement comes in all ages.

    When we catch someone doing it, we pull them out of the theatre and advise them they've just committed a federal crime. And unless they want a visit from the FBI, they'd better delete the file immediately. And then we send them home warning them that they've just had their one chance, and if they're caught doing it again they're not just going to be expelled -- and banned from the premises -- we *will* turn the matter over to the Authorities. The MPAA has a standing offer of a $500 reward for turning in movie bootleggers, and none of us who work here can afford to turn our noses up at that kind of a bonus.
     
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  6. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Have you had any repeat offenders yet? Hint, I'm looking for the "turned them in" story.

    Any idea why they do it? As noted by others, the copies are bad, so what does a 65 year old want with a cellphone copy of a film from a movie screen?

    My coworker's brother was - in theory - doing it for "ideological" reasons (of course, he was in his 30s and supported by his mother), but why are your customers doing it?

    Property rights are property rights. I'm always amazed at how someone who would never ever walk into a store and shoplift has no problem stealing movies or songs off of the web.
     
  7. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    No repeats yet. It always seems to happen during our Sunday afternoon shows for some weird reason, but it's never been the same person twice. I'm itching to rack someone up, though, I could use an extra five Benjamins this month.

    As to why they do it, I doubt it's anything ideological -- it's never the scraggly old hippies who do it, and we have plenty of those. It's always a man -- never a woman, at least not yet -- and he's always well-dressed and well-groomed and seems to react with genuine shock when he's confronted, as though it's never occured to him that it's wrong. It's the same thing with the people who smuggle in food -- it's never poor people or people who look like they're poor, it's always nicely-put-together folks who do it because they expect never to be confronted. I've explained to some of these that we depend on concession sales to keep the place going, and that by smuggling in stuff they're basically stealing the bread off my table, but they just look at me like a cat that's been caught swiping the cheese off a pizza. No remorse, no sense that a lesson's been learned. The amorality of these people is truly remarkable.

    There was a story in the news last year that pretty much summed up this particular type of thinking -- an old woman who snuck onto airline flights seemingly at will. When they finally caught her, she explained herself thusly: "I'm an old white lady. Nobody stops me." It's a peculiar and disturbing sort of privilege-based entitlement that seems to be exactly the attitude I run into here.
     
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  8. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    My old white mother finds it hard to get on flights following the rules as all the steps - get e-ticket or print from machine, go through security, handle luggage while queueing and showing your ticket when "your" zone is called is a bit much for her. She's had to all but give up flying alone. Since the airlines seem to have a pretty good check system in place, I'm amazed anyone can regularly sneak onto a flight.

    Wasn't one of the passengers in the original "Airport" movie an old white woman who snuck onto flights for free?
     
  9. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Location:
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    The Rack from 1956 with Paul Newman, Walter Pigeon, Anne Francis and Edmond O'Brien

    A very early Newman effort and one that should be better known (I recorded it on TCM a few weeks ago, as this is the first time I've seen it pop up anywhere). In addition to an incredible cast, the screenplay is based on a Rod Serling teleplay.

    Newman plays an POW officer just returned from Korea. We quickly learn that Newman is charged with collaborating with the enemy while in captivity. This, not surprisingly, ups, what appears to be, the already immense tension between Newman and his career Army officer dad played by Pigeon.

    Further adding tension, Newman's older brother - also an officer and his father's implied favorite - was killed in Korea leaving his now widowed bride - played by Francis - living in the house with Newman and his dad. Of course, Francis and Newman have feelings for each other - and guilt over those feelings.

    With the conflict and tension already set on high, Newman's court-martial begins. Somewhat echoing Paths of Glory, the trial raises questions about how far one has to go following orders, in this case, under torture, if feigning collaboration to save others is ever right and if and when there is a "breakpoint" when a serviceman is no longer responsible for his actions.

    It's an intense trial that presents both sides - but both sides as seen from a 1956 perspective. Yes, it leans one way, but it is honest and fair to both points of view (a lesson modern film makers need to relearn). And it's ahead of its time in taking on issues that were, often, swept under the rug in WWII, but that were, ultimately, dragged into the light after Vietnam and subsequent wars - and which have been openly debated ever since.

    Serling again proves to be prescient in identifying coming social and cultural issues and challenges. His fingerprints can also be seen in The Twilight Zone style of the movie - regular people abruptly facing existential questions in a severe trial atmosphere.

    While a low-budget affair, the quality of actors and acting is impressive as is the seriousness with which questions of military character and standards - and the expectations and limits of human mental and physical endurance under intense pressure - are debated. It's not a perfect movie, but it deserves much greater recognition today than it presently gets.
     
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  10. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

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    Better than them trying to.... "sing along" with Aretha and not doing too good a job like when I saw it. Umbriago!

    Worf
     
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  11. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

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    4,568
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    My condolences friend. Some of that stuff from the 70's would gag a maggot. "Fashion by Bozo (the Clown)" I called it.

    Worf
     
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  12. Worf

    Worf I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
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    Let me tell you... if you go to ANY barbershop in the Hood you will see stacks of 1st run movies that have been recorded in this manner and being sold in the open. If they're not already there... sit down, have a trim or a fade and I guarantee before you get out the chair some "character" will come in with a bag of bootlegs and attempt to sell you something. As they used to say on Game of Thrones....

    "It is known..."

    Worf
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2019
  13. ChiTownScion

    ChiTownScion One Too Many

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  14. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    Just finished a pre-screening of "The Public," a thought-provoking ensemble drama about homelessness written by, directed by, and starring Emilio Estevez.

    You either like Estevez -- and his worldview -- or you don't, so if you fall into the latter category, you won't like this picture. But I do, and did, and not just because it pushed the right buttons. The setting of the film is the Cincinnati Public Library, which like most big public libraries these days, has become a haven for the homeless, especially during cold weather. Estevez is a minor functionary at this library, who has befriended a cadre of homeless regulars, but then he has a bad day: he's sued for violating the civil rights of a homeless man because he ejected the man from the building due to extreme BO. Estevez is going to lose his job over this, but just as all this is shaking down the homeless organize and decide not to leave the library during the coldest night of the year -- an action provoked by the fact that one of their number froze to death the previous night. Estevez, fed up with a cold city bureacracy and a prosecutor who's a slimy lizard with political ambitions, decides to join the protest.

    And there you go. Despite the super-auteur nature of the production, it's a real ensemble piece, featuring some very fine performances by some very good actors -- Christian Slater as the rat-bastard DA, Alec Baldwin as an unsympathetic police negotiator, Michael K. Williams as the charismatic leader of the homeless men, Jena Malone as a slacktivist library worker who learns that real political action means more than clicking "like" and eating organic kale. And Gabrielle Union is perfect as a preening, superficial TV reporter who swallows the police line on what's really happening at the library because it's getting her lots of Twitter followers.

    The film is billed as a "comedy-drama," and it does have a few laughs, usually at the expense of said TV reporter, but it's not a gagfest by any means. Estevez is quite restrained in his performance, or as restrained as he ever gets, and everyone else does what they're there for. It's a real old-fashioned raised-fist-salute kind of movie, right down to actually seeing a raised-fist salute at a climactic moment.

    Now, you could call this emotional and manipulative and politically shallow all you want, except for one thing -- it's not far from what's really happening in today's libraries. One of my closest friends is, in fact, a librarian in a moderate-sized city, and she tells me this picture is *exactly* the way it really is -- in these days of austerity and budget-slashing, libraries are one of the only refuges left for people who have nowhere else to go. She doesn't think there's any exaggeration in this picture at all -- if anything, it soft-pedals the problem. But its seldom you see a librarian-as-hero movie in any form, and she's pretty excited about it. And I'm proud that we're showing it.
     
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  15. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Calling Lizzie and Worf Re The Rack - the movie I talked about a few posts above. Being based on a Rod Serling teleplay, I thought for sure one or both of you would have seen it / would comment on it. Have either or you - or any other FL members - seen it? While far from perfect, it does seem like a hidden gem being a Serling work with a talented cast centering on an issue that would only become more important in the decades that followed. That's it - just wondering if anyone else knows about this movie or had any thoughts on it.
     
  16. LizzieMaine

    LizzieMaine Bartender

    I haven't, but your description has roused my interest. I'm up for just about anything Serling put out, especially during his "angry young man" years.
     
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  17. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Thank you - I think you'll enjoy it. Separately, did you catch "A Catered Affair" when it was on several weeks ago? That's another Lizzie-type movie (for very different reasons than "The Rack') that I'm excited for you to see.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2019
  18. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    I watched it some time last year on TCM. I remember thinking it was well written and well acted, but that the end of the movie was abrupt and anti-climactic. Other than that, I can't recall any specifics.
     
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  19. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    ⇧ The ending is abrupt and, IMHO, really interesting, but I don't want to go into it here and spoil it for others.


    Currently working from home and winding down a bit on Friday with 1932's "Tarzan, the Ape Man" on silent on TCM in the background.

    With the sound off, you can still see how impressive this movie must have been to a '32 audience. Also, Maureen O'Sullivan is beautiful in a quiet way - she doesn't hit you hard with her beauty; it just slowly washes over you. And if you know the actor C. Aubrey Smith, you can hear his booming British voice even with the sound off :). Last thought, it takes a long time for Tarzan to first appear.
     
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  20. Julian Shellhammer

    Julian Shellhammer Practically Family

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    515
    Slipped my mind - about a week or so ago, The Southerner, with Zachary Scott and Betty Field, struggling farmers in the south. Well-done, with Scott getting to act a believable, sympathetic character. Also with Beulah Bondi as the anti-Mrs. Bailey granny.
     

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