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What was the last TV show you watched?

FOXTROT LAMONT

One Too Many
Messages
1,390
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
The Twilight Zone is superior fare... for the most part, but I liked "The Outer Limits" as well. I'm assuming you have HBO. There are three series on there you MUST watch if you haven't already:

"The Wire:"
"The Sopranos" and perhaps
"True Blood" (the first 4 seasons at least)

I cannot recommend "Game of Thrones" I've never been so disappointed in the end of a series in my life. I won't even touch the latest offering. "Fool me once.....

"Big Little Lies" was a good one as was "Deadwood". There's a lot to watch on there. The first and third seasons of "True Crime" were also stand outs.

Worf

Thanks Worf. I've caught and digested Sopranos-excellent fare. Its finale had me tied in knots days on end.
Haven't seen The Wire but heard it's solid series.
Game of Thrones always looked crap, some asinine Hobbit screw-off goes to Hogwarts and has a gay romp
with Dumbledore then makes play for the series protagonist, and Harry's stuck in a closet no less....

The Outer Limits is good while Serling's mature scripting literally throws the net over me. A few TZ episodes are
YT floaters with Julie Newmar featured. She is fondly remembered eye candy and underrated as actress though
Serling's writ offers hard punch moral dilemma that just grabs me. A razor strop for the mind.
 

Worf

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,172
Location
Troy, New York, USA
"'Salem's Lot" (1997 & 2004) - I watched the original 'Salem's Lot in real time when it first aired. I felt then and still feel that:

1. It is one of the BEST Stephen King adaptations ever done.
2. Its either one or two as far as television adaptations of King's work goes. Some might argue the "IT" was superior.
3. It scared the living bejeebus out of me then (and I was fully grown) and still does today.

Now I never watched the 2004 adaptation before (why mess with perfection) but finally gave in and rented it last night. I went in thoroughly expecting to be disappointed by Rob Lowe and company but found myself pleasantly surprised and covered in goose bumps. Yes the 2004 version is truer to the novel and has great production values but it's main downfall was/is the difference in quality of the main villains.


In 1997 your had James Mason playing Straker (the vampire's "familiar) and in 2004 you get Donald Sutherland. Mason played Straker with a quiet intense malice I've yet seen equaled. He makes your skin crawl and when he comes upon you in the dark you KNOW you're in heap big trouble! He also exudes an aura of being 3 steps ahead of every other player in the game... because he is. Sutherland on the other hand, played the same role with a laugh out loud goofiness that I found both annoying and jarring. A completely wasted character in my opinion and so weak as to be done in by a 15 year old!

The same could be said of the portrayals of Kurt Barlowe, the head vampire in charge. True to the source material Barlowe in 2004 is "just a normal looking guy" who looks and speaks like any of us. Rutger Hauer does a decent job but he doesn't scare me one bit. On the other hand the 1997 Barlowe is a blue/green skinned monstrosity, as much bat as man. A call back to the original "Nosferatu" of the silent era. The stuff of nightmares... When he first appears on the screen he causes one of the characters to literally die of fright!

Despite 2004's lackluster villains they both bring something to the table. And as I first said, I find both miniseries to be entertaining, scary as hell and well worth watching.

Worf
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,698
Location
London, UK
I recently finished the last episode of The Marvellous Mrs Maisel. I'm in the camp that enjoyed the final series. The flash-forward sequences were a little jarring at first, but by the end made sense. I liked that we got to know Susie a lot more in this series - while enough was left still to conjecture. The flashforwards with the kids were unnecessary for me; I really didn't need them to be developed as characters. All that really did was mark out the early indicators that the son was a bit of a dunce, the daughter the prodigy, and they were both affected by their upbringing. That added nothing to it for me - the real joy was the grandparents in the show's "present". Mixed feelings about the flash forwards to Susie and Midge falling out; nice they resolved that by the end, but it also felt a little, unnecessary, somehow. Still, overall a great show - I'd like to see more period pieces done by the same company.

It'll be interesting to see what the next big thing is, what with so many big streaming shows winding down in 2023. The producers behind Lazarus - the promised follow-up series to the original (UK) Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes shows have now announced it won't go ahead because of money; I'm hoping that one of the big streamers will step in here with a deal a la Peaky Blinders and Ripper Street.

On the BBC, I just got done with a miniseries called The Steeltown Murders. A dramatisation of a real life case, this follows a police team in smalltown Wales in the early 1970s and late 1990s (David Blunkett is Home Secretary in the later period, so that puts it post-May 1997). The 90s version of the lead police detective is played by Phillip Glennister (the original Gene Hunt). It's a fascinating story about the hunt for a double-murderer, who turns out to be a 'seriel killer' (the minimum three murders). In the early 70s, they can't prove who he is, but advances in DNA work over the next quarter of a century eventually lead to an identification. It's solid, basic police work, not high drama and car chases. Well worth seeing - and remarkable accurate to the original case, for a television drama. The early 70s fall rather outside the usual TFL period of interest, but the early 1970s of smalltown Wales (much of which would be familiar across the whole of Britain, and even Ireland too) are beautifully recreated. As, indeed, are the late 1990s, a period that is considered "vintage" by the kids today, of course.
 
Messages
19,065
Location
Funkytown, USA
I recently finished the last episode of The Marvellous Mrs Maisel. I'm in the camp that enjoyed the final series. The flash-forward sequences were a little jarring at first, but by the end made sense. I liked that we got to know Susie a lot more in this series - while enough was left still to conjecture. The flashforwards with the kids were unnecessary for me; I really didn't need them to be developed as characters. All that really did was mark out the early indicators that the son was a bit of a dunce, the daughter the prodigy, and they were both affected by their upbringing. That added nothing to it for me - the real joy was the grandparents in the show's "present". Mixed feelings about the flash forwards to Susie and Midge falling out; nice they resolved that by the end, but it also felt a little, unnecessary, somehow. Still, overall a great show - I'd like to see more period pieces done by the same company.

It'll be interesting to see what the next big thing is, what with so many big streaming shows winding down in 2023. The producers behind Lazarus - the promised follow-up series to the original (UK) Life on Mars and Ashes to Ashes shows have now announced it won't go ahead because of money; I'm hoping that one of the big streamers will step in here with a deal a la Peaky Blinders and Ripper Street.

On the BBC, I just got done with a miniseries called The Steeltown Murders. A dramatisation of a real life case, this follows a police team in smalltown Wales in the early 1970s and late 1990s (David Blunkett is Home Secretary in the later period, so that puts it post-May 1997). The 90s version of the lead police detective is played by Phillip Glennister (the original Gene Hunt). It's a fascinating story about the hunt for a double-murderer, who turns out to be a 'seriel killer' (the minimum three murders). In the early 70s, they can't prove who he is, but advances in DNA work over the next quarter of a century eventually lead to an identification. It's solid, basic police work, not high drama and car chases. Well worth seeing - and remarkable accurate to the original case, for a television drama. The early 70s fall rather outside the usual TFL period of interest, but the early 1970s of smalltown Wales (much of which would be familiar across the whole of Britain, and even Ireland too) are beautifully recreated. As, indeed, are the late 1990s, a period that is considered "vintage" by the kids today, of course.

My only beef with the last season of Mrs. Maisel is it seemed to get too impressed with itself. Over the course of the series, I enjoyed the snappy dialogue and witty banter. Season 6 seemed to bring us that in spades, as if they were trying to live up to their own image.
 
Messages
19,065
Location
Funkytown, USA
My wife and I are almost through the first season of The Diplomat, with Keri Russell and Rufus Sewell. Ms. Russell is a recently assigned Ambassador to Afghanistan whose career is derailed by an international incident involving the UK, Iran, and Russia. She gets assigned, instead as the Ambassador to the UK at the last minute and has to both dive in and attend to the incident, but also switch gears to a more highly managed protocol for being Ambassador. ON top of all of this, the aging president (Michael McKean) is looking to groom her as VP, as the current VP is about to be swallowed by scandal.

Sewell is her husband, a long-serving and well-respected international operator and former Ambassador who is a loose cannon. Their marriage is "on the rocks," but they also have a co-dependent relationship that works in a weird way.

It's pretty entertaining, as long as you don't take it too seriously. Fortunately, it also doesn't take itself too seriously and can be pretty funny. There are several over-the-top scenes which use humor to get the point of international intrigue across, instead of treating everything as serious and earth moving. The series is set, presumably, in the present real world. The president is an older man with a female VP. The Ukraine war is discussed, as well as some other contemporary political occurances.

We have 2 eps left to go, and it appears to have been picked up for a second season. I would imagine they will be setting the Russell character up to move into the VP slot by the end of the season.

Netflix, BTW.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,698
Location
London, UK
My only beef with the last season of Mrs. Maisel is it seemed to get too impressed with itself. Over the course of the series, I enjoyed the snappy dialogue and witty banter. Season 6 seemed to bring us that in spades, as if they were trying to live up to their own image.

A lot of the popular criticism of Season 4 pushed the narrative that it was getting "too serious", so it's possible they dialled that up to address that. I thought the closing device (the empty sets) was cute - I'm sure I've seen it done before, but can't recall where.
 
Messages
19,065
Location
Funkytown, USA
A lot of the popular criticism of Season 4 pushed the narrative that it was getting "too serious", so it's possible they dialled that up to address that. I thought the closing device (the empty sets) was cute - I'm sure I've seen it done before, but can't recall where.

My favorite scene in the whole series is Joel and his friend talking and hitting baseballs in the park. TO my knowledge that was a single take and it was brilliant, as well as captivating.

If you know it was spliced together, please don't tell me. I like this fantasy.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,698
Location
London, UK
My favorite scene in the whole series is Joel and his friend talking and hitting baseballs in the park. TO my knowledge that was a single take and it was brilliant, as well as captivating.

If you know it was spliced together, please don't tell me. I like this fantasy.

I'm not aware of anything that says it's not a single take. I loved what they did with Joel in the final series. I always thought he was a drip; about midway through the last series, there's a point where he actually doesn't something very selfless that leads ultimately to him doing time in prison - that made me actually rather like him. I also enjoyed that they made it clear enough Midge doesn't just fall back into his arms - or, for that matter, does she find/need a man to complete her success. All very three dimensional.
 

LizzieMaine

Bartender
Messages
32,855
Location
Where The Tourists Meet The Sea
Being in the unaccustomed position of having a few nights off each week, I've picked up the habit of watching reruns of "The Beverly Hillbillies" on basic cable, and it's been interesting to revisit this series. It was a family favorite when I was growing up, and I had a child's appreciation for the goofiness of the gags -- but revisiting it now, after not having seen it on a regular basis in many years, it's with a fresh appreciation of the quality of the satire. In latter-day consideration of the three "Hooterville Universe" series of the 1960s, "Hillbillies" tends to be overshadowed by the surreal eccentricity of "Green Acres," but its tone is far more charged than either of the other two shows, with its pointed critique of postwar bourgeois aspirationalism. While Jethro chases his fantasies, and Mr. Drysdale plots and schemes, and Granny actively resists bourgeoisification, old Jed just sits there and whittles and knows that wealth has not, and cannot, change the fundamental core of who he is. It's a deep message for a silly 1960s sitcom, and in these days of superficial tech billionaires finding ever-more-elaborate ways to be completely asinine, it's still a message with power. One could imagine Jethro scheming even now to buy his own social media platform.
 
Messages
10,245
Location
vancouver, canada
We have been slowly working our way through the 11 Seasons of "Doc Martin". We are just in Season 3 and it is a great oasis of silly Brit humour, eccentric characters and lovely scenery. A nice respite from the death and drama of cop shows. It will be interesting to see how they manage to sustain it over the 11 seasons.
 

Worf

I'll Lock Up
Messages
5,172
Location
Troy, New York, USA
Being in the unaccustomed position of having a few nights off each week, I've picked up the habit of watching reruns of "The Beverly Hillbillies" on basic cable, and it's been interesting to revisit this series. It was a family favorite when I was growing up, and I had a child's appreciation for the goofiness of the gags -- but revisiting it now, after not having seen it on a regular basis in many years, it's with a fresh appreciation of the quality of the satire. In latter-day consideration of the three "Hooterville Universe" series of the 1960s, "Hillbillies" tends to be overshadowed by the surreal eccentricity of "Green Acres," but its tone is far more charged than either of the other two shows, with its pointed critique of postwar bourgeois aspirationalism. While Jethro chases his fantasies, and Mr. Drysdale plots and schemes, and Granny actively resists bourgeoisification, old Jed just sits there and whittles and knows that wealth has not, and cannot, change the fundamental core of who he is. It's a deep message for a silly 1960s sitcom, and in these days of superficial tech billionaires finding ever-more-elaborate ways to be completely asinine, it's still a message with power. One could imagine Jethro scheming even now to buy his own social media platform.
I view this show as another one of those properties that could NEVER be made today. While I've not seen the show in a loooooong time, I did watch a lot of re-runs of it in the 80's when many channels were starved of "original" content. I often quote the show.... sometimes urging my son to show off his "gozintas" . Also muse on Jethro's desire to be a "Double Knot" spy. "Uncle Jed, them Double Knot spies gits all the girls!" My fave though was the long suffering Miss Jane Hathaway and her long standing quest to bed Jethro (why I never understood) if brains wuz gunpowder the boy couldn't blow his nose.

Worf....

Cement Pond!
 
Messages
19,065
Location
Funkytown, USA
I view this show as another one of those properties that could NEVER be made today. While I've not seen the show in a loooooong time, I did watch a lot of re-runs of it in the 80's when many channels were starved of "original" content. I often quote the show.... sometimes urging my son to show off his "gozintas" . Also muse on Jethro's desire to be a "Double Knot" spy. "Uncle Jed, them Double Knot spies gits all the girls!" My fave though was the long suffering Miss Jane Hathaway and her long standing quest to bed Jethro (why I never understood) if brains wuz gunpowder the boy couldn't blow his nose.

Worf....

Cement Pond!

When the new millenium approached, some coworkers and I debated what to call the decade of the 2000s. "Double-naught" won hands down.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
24,698
Location
London, UK
When the new millenium approached, some coworkers and I debated what to call the decade of the 2000s. "Double-naught" won hands down.


"The noughties" was a popular one in the more inane end of the media over here. I can but hope those who perpetuated it are bound for the same circle of Hell as those who celebrated the "Platty Joobs", as well as those who insist they are Irish once a year while waving a shamrock with one too many fronds and loudly celebrating someone called "Saint Patty" - whomever she may be.
 

AmateisGal

I'll Lock Up
Messages
6,126
Location
Nebraska
Finished watching The Lincoln Lawyer on Netflix which I enjoyed.

Just started The English on Amazon Prime last night. Going to try and not binge it. The first episode was...intense. But these are two fascinating characters.

english.jpg
 

FOXTROT LAMONT

One Too Many
Messages
1,390
Location
St John's Wood, London UK
I'm sorry to be the bearer of bad news, I know a lot of us enjoyed this series:

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I had mixed feelings about the show, but I was definitely looking forward to another season!

I only now learned this. After a fast read and quick cry my suspicions are raised since the series definitely
flexed box office muscle while giving the public substantial viewing fare instead of vapid hackneyed tripe.
Sometimes a production company needs to allow sufficient lead time for audiences to rediscover a seemingly
lost series after a two-year hiatus. All more so if its initial run was overwhelmingly favourable.
 
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