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Whitefeather Mfg. 1930s car coat

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by hollows, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. hollows

    hollows New in Town

    Here's my newest jacket...


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    The pocket flaps are designed so that you can tuck them if you like. I've been wearing them tucked so far, but it's nice to have options.

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    The leather is full-grain Italian horsehide. Compared to Shinki it's a bit thicker, more pliable when new, the finish is more matte and the grain character is outstanding. Shinki is cleaner, has fewer scars and bite marks, but is also a bit less interesting to look at. Both feel very good to wear, and will likely last longer than you, so I consider the choice between the two to be mainly a matter of preference.

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    I went with a plain back for my jacket. Normally this style comes with two small button adjusters on the back, but I asked to leave them off, as I find the adjusters are mostly aesthetic and tend to get snagged on chairs, backpacks and the like.

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    One oddity about this jacket is the all-leather buttonholes. Some very early leather garments (such as the British WWI horsehide jerkins) use a similar style. There are also a few modern makers doing this, and I suspect that it is a way to avoid using the dreaded Reece buttonhole machine. Every clothing maker I've spoken to has horror stories of the endless repairs this machine demands. Regardless of why, I find the leather buttonholes to be well executed and they should be exceedingly durable. A sewn buttonhole would be more historically accurate, but that's not a priority for me.

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    The main lining fabric is a sort of walnut brown corduroy, which adds a nice combination of warmth and versatility.

    The jacket isn't perfect (none are), but it's an incredible value, and I think it leads the pack in its price range, especially for car coat styles. Jackets from Himel, Goodwear, and Freewheelers are a bit nicer when you put them under the microscope. My Himel has laser-perfect stitching and very nicely skived flat seams, but also costs over twice as much.

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    Whitefeather's site is here: http://whitefeathermfg.com/
     
    Guppy, handymike, samo and 8 others like this.
  2. Good looking jacket Nick. Fardin does nice work. I particularly like his A-1.

    Stupid questions: Isn't this new jacket remarkably similar to your Canuck -- both in cut and color?
     
    Sloan1874 likes this.
  3. handymike

    handymike My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Thanks for posting this beauty!
    Fardin's work doesn't get much play here, and it should.
     
  4. Cooperson

    Cooperson One Too Many

    Like it!
     
  5. hollows

    hollows New in Town

    It is, but considerably more comfortable fit. Maybe I hit the benchpress too hard (eye roll emoji). So it goes.
     
  6. devilish

    devilish A-List Customer

    Nick, well done for spreading the word about Fardin and Whitefeather. Someday my inner Howard Hughes wants one of his 30's Aviators.
     
  7. Fardin will have a booth at InspirationLA.
     
  8. hollows

    hollows New in Town

    As long as this inner Hughes doesn't tell you to hurt people, I think we're okay here.
     
  9. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

    Is it a car coat? Perhaps, though for me a true car coat needs to be 3/4 length and this one is very short. I've seen half-belts longer than this Whitefeather.

    I like this pattern/style and have a Johnson Leather style in steer that is not dissimilar which is amongst my favourite jackets.
     
  10. hollows

    hollows New in Town

    Yes, absolutely.

    All of the car coat designs I've seen from the mid 30s and earlier are similar length:

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    Car coats from the late 30s on tend to be longer, sometimes belted or double breasted, but the early ones look generally like the Whitefeather, Himel Canuck, Freewheelers Brakeman, etc.
     
  11. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

    OK - see I thought these were more like chore coats worn as car coats but I'm happy to defer to your expertise. My Johnson Leathers is a short one too.
     
  12. Hollows, wow, thanks for flagging this up. Tried to PM you but your status on the FL might be too new. This is a beauty and could be a solution for me: I'd been tossing up between one of the Aero car coats, none of which I'm completely happy about, and saving up for a few years for the admittedly very nice Himel Canuck.

    I had never heard of Whitefeather before. How are you finding the jacket now? What's the lowest temperature you'd wear it in? No problems showing up with a few months' wear?

    Also, if you have any fitting advice, it'd be much appreciated. What size did you take and what are your dimensions?

    Cheers!
     
  13. Fanch

    Fanch My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Very nice, somewhat similar to my Aero Mulligan the way the flaps can be tucked in.
     
  14. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd One Too Many

    Thats really nice! Thanks for posting, this co. wasn't even on my radar....not that I need more options to drool over these days lol
     
  15. Pdawg

    Pdawg Familiar Face

    Fardin lets you do made to measure. And i think the wait time is about three months. And i think he uses victoria hh if i am not mistaken.
     
    ProteinNerd likes this.
  16. Thanks, all. Fanch, got a link to pics of your Mulligan at all?

    Not sure what Victoria HH is.

    Anyone know any more about Fardin's story?

    Very few pics or info online.
     
  17. Pdawg

    Pdawg Familiar Face

  18. I notice on the cossack version the pocket holes are of a different type. Do you think White Feather will be using the standard production from now on ?
    I plan to visit the shop in Vienna early next year and might buy a jacket.
     
  19. Pdawg

    Pdawg Familiar Face

    Yeah i dont think he uses the buttonholer. It is probably handsewn and horizontal.
     

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