All things Woolrich

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by harrier1022, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

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    Hi everyone,

    I am new here but wanted to make my first post about Woolrich as I have been collecting pieces for a little while and am trying to find more information on a few items. I have many pieces from the 1930s-1950s and have actually used the label identification on here as a way to decipher when each shirt or jacket was produced. Many of the items I have are very close to new in condition but one item I have I can't find much information on. It is a model 258 stag style shirt jacket from the early 1930s and is really nice. Does anyone have any information on this model? Also, I have a 523 Hunt Coat with talon game pouches from the mid-1930s among other shirts from that era (model 33). Lastly, on the Woolrich Hunt Pants, what Talon zipper tabs are older...the longer thin rectangular ones or the ones that widen at the bottom of the pull tab? Also, please feel free to share what you have in your collection as I would love to see what gems all of you have in regards to Woolrich. Thank you and I hope to enjoy this site! Best wishes!
     
    tmitchell59 likes this.
  2. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton One Too Many

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    Location:
    Midwest
    Photos?
     
    tmitchell59 likes this.
  3. tmitchell59

    tmitchell59 Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Illinois
    I have a growing interest in the wool products. I recently purchased a few items. I don't have any Woolrich garments yet. This may be a very informative thread. Without pictures I would say the wider zipper are older if you are talking about clothes from the later 30s.
     
  4. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

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    6
    I will try and get pictures up. I was wondering about the zipper pulls because I have like 5-6 pairs of 1930s Woolrich Hunt Pants and each has a slightly different configuration. I figure maybe because of The Great Depression they were just using what they could or had at the time since the garments were probably expensive for the everyday worker at that point.
     
  5. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

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    The earliest coat I have is the 258 like I mentioned in my first post and I think its really neat. The "Red Hunt" pattern on it is slightly different than the traditional 503/523 Hunt Coats. Plus, the buttons are shinier (still maroon) than the hunt coats and the one button on the pocket appears to never have been opened as one of the threads is still connected. And the label on the earliest one says "John Rich" with the sheep looking straight ahead (or left on the label) unlike later labels which the sheep looks as if it is looking at the person. I have mid/late-1930s Woolrich catalog and it mentions a 255 Stag jacket but not a 258. Any help and/or history would be great. Thank you!
     
  6. Peacoat

    Peacoat Bartender Staff Member Bartender

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    4,827
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    The only Woolrich product I have is a Mackinaw hunting jacket. It's probably from the 60s/70s, based on Stewart's guide. The sleeves are a bit short. I like it enough to spend the money on lengthening the sleeves. Will probably cost me almost as much as I paid for the jacket. The old Mackinaws are of a heavier wool than the more recent stuff.

    Welcome to the Lounge.
     
  7. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

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    I agree the old Wool is heavier for sure. I have 1930s hunt coats and have compared to the newer ones before discontinuation and there is a heftier feel difference for sure.
     
  8. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton One Too Many

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    1,000
    Location:
    Midwest
    If you're interested in doing a little research on wool weights and that history, call up the Pendleton fabric outlet. I called a few years ago looking for some 100% heavy blanket fabric and talked to someone who knew their stuff. They no longer make 100% heavy wool. Everything now includes some nylon in a blend, and they also no longer make the really heavy material like I envisioned using. They sent me a package of swatches, and nothing was like what I expected. I don't remember the numbers exactly, but I think I wanted something in the 30oz/yard realm, and the thickest they had was 22 or 24oz. Don't hold me to those numbers, but the difference was significant. I believe Woolrich was one of the first to use a nylon blend. 85/15. I'd be curious to know the date when that started. It has to be as early as the 70s and possibly as late as the 80s. As much as I can tell, Filson is the only one using super heavy weight 100% wool. I'd like to know where they get it milled since it is so scarcely produced now.
    Woolrich played an interesting marketing hand all along. They weren't trying for the top market like Filson and a couple others. They cut out their niche below the likes of Pendleton. It was workwear for the blue collar. Their shirts were 50% or more less than Pendleton. It allowed for them to use blends, because their customers weren't as demanding. I have several Woolrich shirts and jackets, and I like them all a lot. Because the quality was a little less with weaves that weren't as heavy, as tight, or as dense, it does make them feel cheaper, but at the same time, it almost makes them more versatile. I don't live in the Arctic, so I don't always have a need for the heaviest, densest wool. I can wear my Woolrich cruiser in fall and spring and be comfortable. The periods when I can wear my other cruisers, of arguably better quality, are smaller. One of my favorite hiking shirts is a Woolrich from the 80s. It breathes well because it isn't so dense. I've used it so much that you can readily see the nylon base weave (not sure that that is technically called). I think I paid $15 or $18 for that shirt, while Pendletons were $40-50.
     
  9. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    4,022
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    It will not be period correct but something I have used to lengthen the sleeves on a few wool jackets....my wife knits a 'storm cuff' in a matching or complementary colour wool then sews them into the inside of the sleeve end. This gives me a low cost, comfortable and unobtrusive fix for the shortness in the sleeve.
     
  10. Cornelius

    Cornelius One of the Regulars

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    135
    Location:
    Great Lakes
    There is a fantastic shop in Chicago called Fishman's Fabrics. Family run operation in what had been the old garment district / Maxwell Street Market area, they're now at least four generations in the business. It's where interior designers choose raw material for custom upholstery or drapes, and tailors buy fabric for custom suiting. They know their stuff and have long business relationships with textile mills worldwide. They do sell various 100% wool weaves, but I am not sure as to weights available. If they don't stock what you need I imagine they, if anyone, would at least be able to tell you whether or not it's even manufactured these days: 1.312.922.7250 or https://fishmansfabrics.com/

    Please let us know what you hear - if someone out there makes 28 or 32 oz. tightly-woven 100% wool, I might be commissioning a custom Mackinaw...
     
  11. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton One Too Many

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Thanks for the idea. I gave them a call. The numbers seem to still be in line with what I found a few years ago. The heaviest 100% wool is 24oz at $75/yard called America Wool. https://fishmansfabrics.com/america-wool/
     
    Cornelius likes this.
  12. Peacoat

    Peacoat Bartender Staff Member Bartender

    Messages:
    4,827
    Location:
    South of Nashville
    Too bad the 28 oz fabric is no longer available. I guess the only way to get it is with the vintage coats. Filson's plaid Mackinaws are close at 26 oz.
     
  13. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

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    6
    What's a safe long term method of storing some of these older Woolrich items? Would a tote with a sealed lid (Steralite type) with silica packets and cedar balls/rings be sufficient? Thanks!
     
  14. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,000
    Location:
    Midwest
    I use vacuum compression/space storage bags someone gave me, but I just manually roll the air out of the valve. I don't use a vacuum. Too much hassle and doesn't seem necessary. I don't see why your idea wouldn't work. use what you got.
     
  15. harrier1022

    harrier1022 New in Town

    Messages:
    6
    Are there many Woolrich items out there with the earliest label...sheep looking straight (from the early 1930s as Dinerman mentioned). When did Woolrich hunt coats and consumer apparel come out in general? Thanks!
     

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