Durable cotton t-shirts to pair with leather jackets

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Rich22, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. Sloan1874

    Sloan1874 I'll Lock Up

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    When I see the words 'dress jeans', I get visions of razor-sharp creases ironed into them. Just wrong.
     
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  2. dudewuttheheck

    dudewuttheheck One Too Many

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    I like the look, because it is so versatile, but I actually prefer off-white/ecru t shirts.
     
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  3. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

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    Was thinking about the images Superfluous posted. About as fancy as I get with a T-shirt is a breast pocket, and I don't really care for those much. I lean over, and everything falls out of them anyway, so I don't use them as often as I think I will. If you get into special weaves, various colors and detailed stitching, hi-tech fabrics, custom options for fit etc, made by my dying grandmother's hands in the guest room of our home, and various other possibilities that hinder mass production, I fully understand higher price tags. Like most things in life, it then becomes about whether those things are valuable to each customer. To me, a different color thread or perfect stitching isn't worth peanuts in my list of T-shirt priorities. They would be in a shoe, jacket, or even a pair of pants. So, I get it. I guess I hadn't thought about the existence of $138 plain white T-shirts until now.
     
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  4. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

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    @Ernest P S, I'm still trying to process the concept that a T-shirt can be the centerpiece of an ensemble.
    If you're 17 years old and wearing a Clash or Nirvana T-shirt because (you think) its (allegedly) retro cool message signals to others something about you (that you desperately feel you need strangers to know!), then yes, I get it, we've all been there.
    But as an adult man seriously considering T-shirts as centerpieces of ensembles, well I need to digest that way more before I pounce. Right now it's just beyond my comprehension.

    @Sloan, I think people see models in magazines wearing 'dress jeans' and think it's a look they can do, but maybe they don't realize that everyone looks at them and thinks 'dad jeans'?
    I've never seen it look 'good' (relatively) IRL on anyone who wasn't tall, slim and rich/powerful enough that no one could call them out on it (I'm thinking of my Japanese friend who owns a soccer club).
     
  5. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    To me, t-shirts are what I wear when I don't care how I look. This became especially true in my late twenties and thirties. If I'd worn one professionally (as opposed to a polo shirt on the hottest days), I'd probably have been called out on it. Wearing a t-shirt in front of clients would be embarrassing. At home, though, I'll wear a t-shirt to slop about in, and they're great for a few pints and a kebab.
     
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  6. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    I used to wear a black t-shirt as my primary upper garment for years. I never considered what others thought about this. With black jeans, and a no 3 buzz cut I generally looked like a barman or security. Fine by me.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2019
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  7. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Dress codes where I usually work vary from formal to smart casual. I avoid suit-wearing unless it's for very important occasions, but I'm also sailing too close to the wind if I don't have a collar of some sort! Dickies workshirts are a happy medium.
     
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  8. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

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    Superfluous is a lawyer, so I guess when he talks about wearing T-shirts, he means at weekends? I don't know much about the world of lawyers though.

    @Superfluous, you buy a lot of expensive casual clothes, do you buy expensive suits for work too? I've never noticed you mention suits before. I buy made to measure suits and dress shirts, but that's only because off the peg Japanese sizes stink on me because of the proportions. Luckily, I don't have to wear suits very often anymore, so I kind of enjoy it when I do.

    I'm still wondering how the T-shirt as ensemble centerpiece thing works. First one buys an expensive T-shirt, but how do you stop high end leather jackets, handmade boots, japanese denim and (say) a 10k watch from just drowning out the T-shirt?
    Or would one have to wear the high end t-shirt with sneakers, cheap jeans, and a G-shock for that kind of quality to stand out?
     
  9. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Although I don't need to wear suits that often, I think that suits I've had made in Hong Kong (HK tailors: expensive but often outstanding) and Shanghai (excellent tailoring is available in several places) are a world away from off-the-rack fits. If I am going to wear a suit, it is going to tell all the other suits where to sit down.
     
  10. navetsea

    navetsea Call Me a Cab

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    depending on the climate, I think t-shirt that is meant to be worn stand alone not underwear kind of t-shirt would be fine if the wearer look the part and also there is a different between death metal t-shirt or animal/ superhero/ cartoon print t-shirt and adult t-shirt, my father was a civil engineer he wore a lot of striped t-shirt and poloshirt when visiting a site. longsleeve t-shirt looks better in my opinion:)
     
  11. Monitor

    Monitor I'll Lock Up

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    I agree with the notion that you can't wear a truly fancy t-shirt. Clean t-shirt, sure. One that fits well, yeah. But one that stands out as superior to any other (with the absence of a logo or a cool print)? I'd have to see it to believe it.

    Nice suits look nice. I can't wear them but they do look nice.
     
  12. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    It's a very classic look, one that I think was unfortunately ruined for a lot of us when the producers of Happy Days chose to reference it with the Fonz. Don't get me wrong, I found that show entertaining, but Arthur Fonzarelli was never going to be a Johnny Strabler or Jim Stark in the style stakes.

    I know, madnes, innit? It makes me think of the truculent manchild who refuses to wear a suit because he's "not a square", and turns up at a wedding in black jeans, thinking he's somehow sticking it to the man. I think we all know that guy. If he's not in jeans and a novelty t-shirt with a collar and tie printed on it, he's wearing an actual tie with a cartoon character on it and spends all evening telling anyone who'll listen that it's his only tie - because, you knowe, he's not a square that wears ties like the rest of us.

    Add a black MA1 and that's quasi-formal wear for some eighties skinheads. ;) I've been taken for security in a Soho nightclub before now - I was in black tie at the time!

    I am glad that to date there's been no dress code in academia. It's definitely gotten much more casual over the years; I don't remember any of my lecturers ever wearing jeans (which, depending on his diary, my head of department now often does) though it does vary by discipline - computer scientists and the art set are often much more casual than would be the norm for us lawyers. I like being free to mix it up; I rarely wear jeans to work (even at weekend-based residential events), but it's nice to have the option if I want to. I'm mostly a blazer and trousers guy, mostly but not always a tie (which can vary between four in hand, bow, and cravat). When weather permits I'm very partial to the collar and tie with a leather jacket look, Howard Hughes style. Vive la difference!

    Bespoke, and even M2M will always look that bit sharper than OTR on most people. I've yet to have anything made in China (apart from shoes, which were wonderful), but eventually.... There used to be a young fella on TFL - Ray? in LA or New York? - who had a fantastic 30s-cut linen suit made on the Nathan Road in HK; apparently they kept the patterns. No idea which tailor, though. I have heard that the improbably named "Dave's Custom Tailors" in Shanghai is meant to be good too.... I spend my work time in Beijing, most places I've seen there so far are more the novelty 'suit made in 24hours' variety, with quality being naturally variable.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2019
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  13. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

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    @Edward, that's interesting because I've always felt that WWII RAF and Luftwaffe pilots were real 'knights of the air', proper gentlemen, and that their leather flight jackets looked pretty good over dress shirts and ties.
    On the other hand, I feel that despite being originally designed to be worn as such, all the US flight jackets look much better without ties, more casual shirts and (at their best) over a white cotton T-shirt. That's the power of 'Hollywood' right there in shaping perceptions of class and culture.
     
  14. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

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    That could be an interesting topic or side conversation. Or maybe we're already having it? What does a particular piece of clothing mean to you? For instance, I already said a T-shirt is utilitarian, but I should have also added that it means comfort to me. When I want to feel comfortable (during half the months), I put on a T-shirt. I don't necessarily view them as sloppy or for slopping around town, either. Utility. Comfort. Minimalism. But I have family members who feel comfortable in dress shirts, khakis, and penny loafers. They wouldn't be comfortable in a T-shirt, even at home watching a baseball game on their couch. Their leisure clothes are a different set than mine.

    And then this all changes with the situation. When I take walks at night during the summer months, I like a thin linen short-sleeved dress shirt with two pockets. Utility and comfort. Outside of that situation, I feel short-sleeved dress shirts are a hideous piece of clothing...an embarrassingly ugly piece of clothing, and I don't even get embarrassed. They're awful. That's all. But I still find a situation to prefer them.
     
  15. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Even in high heat and humidity (around 40C), a long sleeve linen shirt is just as comfortable as a short sleeve one- I prefer the look of long sleeve ones. Polo shirt really saves the day, too.
     
    Edward likes this.
  16. Superfluous

    Superfluous My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I do not wear t-shirts to work. Therefore, the majority of my t-shirt usage in on the weekend (although I do wear them during the week as well, outside of work).

    1. The role of t-shirts in one’s wardrobe depends on many factors, including general style preferences, climate, local clothing practices, etc. I live in a warm climate where a short-sleeved t-shirt is an appropriate outer-layer more than half of the year. The local clothing practices are very casual. Outside of work, my preferred style is VERY casually. It is very rare that I wear anything but jeans outside of work (and often in the office unless circumstances dictate otherwise). Unless my plans call for a collar shirt, I usually wear t-shirts with my jeans. Thus, jeans and a t-shirt is my goto weekend outfit, and I *might* swap out a collared shirt for an evening dinner with friends. You recently posted that you prefer a coat, slacks, and dress shirt for social gatherings. For me, this is a very formal look for a social gathering, it is very rare that I dress in this manner for social gatherings, and the event must necessitate such attire before I will abandon jeans and a smart collared shirt. To be clear, I am not disparaging dressier attire and, when duty calls, I dress accordingly. That said, I much prefer a more casual approach. Moreover, I have become increasingly more casual as I get older.

    2. Given that a shirt is an eye-level clothing article that spans a considerable portion of your body, it naturally receives a significant amount of focus and attention. IMHO, in the absence of a jacket, one’s shirt is the single most important aspect of his/her clothing ensemble. The fact that you are wearing a t-shirt, rather than a collared shirt, does not alter the inherent prominence of the shirt. Rather, even in the absence of a collar, the shirt remains a focal clothing item. Therefore, I emphasize the importance of a t-shirt to the same degree that I emphasize the importance of any other shirt. Just as I patronize quality collared shirts, I also patronize quality t-shirts for the same reason. Given my generally casual style preferences, quality t-shirts are even more important because I wear them more often.

    3. I do not worry about dominant clothing articles “drowning out” less prominent clothing articles. Moreover, I don’t believe that quality jeans, footwear, or watches overshadow a quality t-shirt. Rather, I believe that quality articles of clothing compliment and enhance each other. For example, quality t-shirts enhance quality jeans, and vice-versa. Conversely, IMHO, a poor quality t-shirt can detract from a great jacket.

    4. I genuinely do not care if anyone else notices the quality of my t-shirt. I am aware and that is all that matters. Moreover, the overwhelming majority of people have no ability to discern quality clothing and will never notice. Thus, chasing third party approval is a losing proposition.

    Yes, I also purchase quality suits, dress shirts, ties, and dress shoes. That said, similar to you, I do not wear suits very often anymore, and only when circumstances require a suit (e.g., in court). The overwhelming majority of the time, I wear more casual clothing for my work endeavors (although not t-shirts).

    I don’t know what a “fancy” t-shirt is, and I hope that none of my t-shirts qualify as “fancy.” That sounds like a Gucci print t-shirt, which is the antithesis of what I wear.

    I do not wear t-shirts that “stand out as superior.” Rather, I wear understated quality solid and striped t-shirts that likely garner little or no attention, and certainly do not “stand out as superior.” I would be shocked if anyone else noticed the quality of my t-shirts. As noted above, I wear quality clothing, including t-shirts, because I personally prefer the additional quality, and not because anyone else is likely to notice.

    Lastly, I do not wear any t-shirts with logos or prints. I only wear solid colors and stripes. Moreover, I do not provide free advertising as a walking billboard, and no one has offered me a royalty deal to advertise for them on my t-shirts.
     
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  17. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

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    Yes! I hate athletic gear because of this. Logos EVERYWHERE. I used to skateboard with a guy who refused to wear any T-shirt with a logo or branding. Not all that easy at the time, so he spraypainted and dyed all his plain shirts to match his colorful personality. He was steadfast about it, too. Something I liked and respected about him a lot. I also think of Bethanie Mattek-Sands, a professional tennis player, who wore an unusual amount of unbranded clothing. I don't know if she removed the logos or what, but I can promise you it stood out. Sometimes, even her sneakers were altered and without logos. I don't know if she couldn't get herself a clothing contract or what (she's a grand slam champion), but I suspect because of how consistently her socks, skirts, tops, hats, and strings were logo-less, it was all intentional. I can also remember that rare Toyota truck owner who would remove all the emblems and giant TOYOTA stickers from the tailgate. Logos aren't just free advertising, but they're obviously a status thing. Sold as some sort of achievement in life. I don't want any of it. Like you, I don't think about what others are thinking about my clothing (or anything, really). It's all for my satisfaction.
     
  18. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

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    @Superfluous, thank you for your answer. It IS good not to have to wear suits to work everyday! Hats off to all white collar professionals successful enough to be able to choose when they wear a suit!
    I wear made to measure because of the impossibility of getting an off the peg suit that fits here, and whilst they are not cheap, and I can enjoy wearing them every now and again, I never really get excited about wearing suits and enjoy it like I do flight jackets.

    I guess the t-shirt thing to me is like highend leather jackets were 25 years ago; if someone told me about it back then, I'd have been incredulous, but now I get it. OTOH, it could be like selvedge denim, which I don't really get, preferring modern Levi's.

    @zebedee, I wear long sleeved linen shirts in summer too. I feel like I look like a child in shorts AND a short sleeves shirt, but a casual linen shirt with long sleeves cuffs turned up twice, is a better look for me.
    I have short sleeved button up linen shirts, with oversized prints of hula girls on them, and only wear them *ironically* (i.e. when I'm at a party with alcohol).
     
  19. Rich22

    Rich22 One of the Regulars

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    Not even tiny logos on the left hand side of the chest? I actually *slightly* prefer that to completely plain t-shirts, for two reasons; It looks to me like something is missing if it's absent, and secondly, it invokes the look of own-brand $2 crap in many people's eyes. (rightly or wrongly)

    Conversely I would never wear a dress shirt with any visible logo.
     
  20. navetsea

    navetsea Call Me a Cab

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    T shirt and denim jacket are more matching together than tshirt and leather jacket, depending on the style of the leather jacket of course but i see turtleneck jumper or collared top looks better or even cooler under leather jacket, only my personal opinion obviously
     

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