Great coats.. To wear or not to wear that is the question?

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Mad Mac, Dec 5, 2020.

  1. Mad Mac

    Mad Mac New in Town

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    Have a couple of great coats absolutely ideal for terrible Scottish winters, one was my own issued by the RAF ATC that I got to keep as they were doing away with the uniform issue in the 80s /90s. And another is civil defence so non military. Sad thing is of late I've been hesitant to wear them as I recieved the usual snobbish attitude from some older folk of 'what gives me the right to wear that' it has no rank on it and just states Air Training Corps. Other than the fact I did volunteer with them for year's, it's a bloody excellent coat for hideous damp Scottish winters, felt like saying as a tax payer that pays for this kit for the MOD in general I've got every right. I can understand if it had a rank on it, or medals or some other military insignia, but it's plain minus one badge on the left arm. Is there some sort of rules I'm not aware of when using it as civilian attire? I'm not dressing up in johdpurs and goggles and being Walter mitty, I'm wearing it with boots jeans and a scarf and beanie hat. Maybe I've insulted a touchy ex ATC vet... that's fought many a battle in Chipmunks and gliders or polished boots and plaques in anger until his fingers blead like I did..
     
  2. Carlos840

    Carlos840 My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I vote "wear it", life is too short to worry about what others think of what you wear.
     
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  3. Superfluous

    Superfluous My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    ^ This
     
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  4. belfastboy

    belfastboy I'll Lock Up

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    I am surprised at the reaction you get. Was in Glasgow October of 2019 and wore my red poppy proudly but was saddened to see hardly any Glaswegians wearing the poppy and the vets on the sidewalk selling were ignored. They were treated more as impediments than anything.
     
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  5. ton312

    ton312

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    In my opinion the great coat is simply the longer cousin to the peacoat. I can’t imagine anyone expressing ill will to the wearer of either. They are incredibly common and have been reproduced by just about every single manufacturer of outerwear...ever. I would wear it without a second thought.
     
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  6. Mad Mac

    Mad Mac New in Town

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    Think it's sadly a way of the modern U.K these day's, sounding like my father but the younger Scots don't seem all that bothered I suppose we are now in a generation where the vast majority of Scots will not even have grandparents who fought in a war. I wear mine to remember my grandfather and his struggles during and after and all those that served. Sadly as time marches on I think the poppy will become sadly less relevant, unless a major conflict erupts only natural I suppose?
     
  7. Mad Mac

    Mad Mac New in Town

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    It appears to be mainly ex forces personnel that get their knickers in a twist over a civilian wearing even the most debadged ex military coat or jacket in the U.K. Which I can understand if it had rank names or medals on it. Without it like mine to me they just look like a plane coat almost like an Ulster coat and are very smart. I can't stand the U.Ks outerwear invention for cold weather deterrence (the puffer jacket) think I'd rather wear no coat or jacket at all,than be forced to wear a mobile, Michelin man fancy dress outfit.
     
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  8. MrProper

    MrProper One Too Many

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    I have no idea what these coats look like, but maybe they can be easily converted into something more civilian? Replace other buttons or name tags with something more neutral?
    i did that with a swedish army jacket.
     
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  9. Carlos840

    Carlos840 My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  10. navetsea

    navetsea I'll Lock Up

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    neo in matrix coat?
     
  11. sal

    sal One of the Regulars

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    Wear it
     
  12. Mad Mac

    Mad Mac New in Town

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    Not to similar to a Neo coat so wouldn't get mistaken for the TCM. These coats tend to be any colour other than black, made of heavy duty wool some are double breasted, some single, and they all vary depending upon the country/military of origin. They tend to end halfway between your ankle and knee and sit higher than trenchcoats they've also got a built in back belt and some have a waisted finish. They also have heavy duty cuffs, and any I've owned have been really warm and brilliant in winter.
    Sometimes you can pick them up cheap in second hand/ charity shops in the U.K. or off e.bay. I just can't stand the Australian/ U.K invention of the down coat/jacket, yes they are practical and warm, although not always waterproof but looking like the stay puffed boy from ghost busters isn't an ambition of mine.
     
  13. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    It was a common 1980's thing to wear Army greatcoats in winter over here. Often worn by what we call bogans - I believe that translates as neds or chavs over there. Down coats were created by Eddie Bauer in the 1930's and have no Australian connection to my knowledge. I wore an army overcoat around 1985-86 - can't remember what happened to it.

    You must know some unusual older people for them to bother emphasising the army connection. Or are they just being wiseacres? When I wear a hat, some of the older folk will ask me where my horse is (I live in a city with 5 million people).

    This rather cumbersome outerwear does need to fit properly (they can look ridiculous if oversized). There is along tradition of civilians wearing greatcoats against the cold. They were especially popular right after WW2, when many civilians wore army wear for some years on account of shortages.

    But they don't suit everyone. I think the fag-end of the punk movement started wearing them here so I went off the look.
     
  14. Mad Mac

    Mad Mac New in Town

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    Your correct Eddie Bauer commercialized it's use. But it was invented by an Australian by the name of George Finch for a British Expedition up Everest. Apparently even then the party were taking the micky out of Finch for wearing it as he was carrying out experiments on heat retention, but soon swallowed their words when they realized how warm the down jacket was.
    Sadly I've not known the folk making the wizecracks just random folk over the time I've known it, folk over here seem to use clothes as an excuse for making trouble.
     
  15. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Well, an Australian invented box wine (the wine cask) so I guess they are capable of anything. Puffer jackets weren't really a thing here until Americans and Canadians made then fashionable.
     
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  16. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

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    Brilliant, I fought many a battle in such a plane, whilst in the ATC, flying out of RAF Taunton. The way to deal with touchy ex ATC vets is to give them a two worded sentence, the second word being, "off." You get those morons in all sorts of places, I've been told that the radial tyres on my old MG should be cross plies, I didn't tell him that I had replaced the candle power lights with LED's. Just wear your great coat with pride and cock a snook at any detractor.
     
    Mad Mac likes this.

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