Pleats and cuffs are back babay!

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by TCMfan25, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. TCMfan25

    TCMfan25 Practically Family

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    :eusa_clap

    I was at the Airport recently, and as I watched the people rush by I noticed one common feature...

    Whether in a suit or in semi-formal trousers, about 90% consisted of Pleated and Cuffed Pants!! :eusa_clap:eusa_clap

    Now if only the Lapel would have get larger, and the waistline rise...
     
  2. Kirk H.

    Kirk H. One Too Many

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    I agree with you
     
  3. SgtRick

    SgtRick One of the Regulars

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    Pleated pants with cuffs went out of style? When did this happen? Pleated pants and cuffs is all I have ever worn.
     
  4. GoldenEraFan

    GoldenEraFan One Too Many

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    Agreed
     
  5. TCMfan25

    TCMfan25 Practically Family

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    If only the big brands would agree...
     
  6. Yeps

    Yeps Call Me a Cab

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    I see mostly pleated pants at Kohl's and such. I think it is part of the catering towards, well, bigger men. Pleats are more forgiving.
     
  7. Guttersnipe

    Guttersnipe One Too Many

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    If you look at suits by high end designers and stylish makers, over the last few years, the trend has been towards retroesque slimline cuts. Part of that look is flat front trousers without cuffs of a vaguely 60s vibe.
     
  8. avedwards

    avedwards Call Me a Cab

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    In the UK this is probably more the case than in the US as more people here wear suits, so there's more demand for fashion forward suits. The jackets are usually very 60s inspired with narrow lapels, although 60s jackets were usually made of nicer materials than the crap that's sold at the moment. The trousers are not really reminiscient of the 60s though (other than being quite narrow), as the rise is ridiculously low most of the time unlike 60s trousers which often still had quite a high rise. I think it's quite unfortunate as I like some 60s style but most of the stuff sold at the moment is simply tacky.

    Judging by what I've seen on the websites of American menswear chains it's a lot easier to find trousers and shirts which can be used for a vintage look in the US than over here.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2011
  9. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    Formal=White Tie
    Semi-Formal=Black Tie
     
  10. TCMfan25

    TCMfan25 Practically Family

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    Just trousers then :eusa_doh:
     
  11. avedwards

    avedwards Call Me a Cab

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    I suppose you could say dress trousers since trousers could refer to casual trousers like jeans as well. Or since you're in America the term slacks could also be used.
     
  12. TCMfan25

    TCMfan25 Practically Family

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    Nowadays, when the average person thinks trousers they think dress pants, and pants or jeans as casual.
     
  13. avedwards

    avedwards Call Me a Cab

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    In America. In the UK "pants" are underwear and trousers refers to any form of leg covering that isn't a skirt. :p
     
  14. HodgePodge

    HodgePodge One of the Regulars

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    although, in the UK, if they are of cheap material or poorly tailored, you could say "those trousers are pants!" (The things you learn when your friends move to England...)
     
  15. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

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    A good call, Tomasso. It's frustrating these days when nobody knows the difference.

    I remember wearing a tie to a house party once and my mother complained that I shouldn't dress "formal".

    I can't tell you how confused I was...
     
  16. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

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    While most in the FL would agree, the fact is folks, 99.999999% of people outside of this forum and its like-minded allies have never heard of white tie, let alone do they know the difference between it and black tie.

    It is reality that "formal" to the average person today means suit and tie OF ANY DESCRIPTION for men, and "female equivalent" for women.

    Back on topic, I coincidentally came across this link about 10 minutes ago. Cue the image regarding pleated pants/trousers/slacks:

    http://lifestyle.ca.msn.com/beauty-fashion/mens-style/gallery.aspx?cp-documentid=29551644&page=1
     
  17. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    I'm not sure about that. I would imagine that through wedding and proms most people become acquainted with formal wear by time they leave high school. Many having even rented from the myriad of formal wear shops scattered across the land. I just can't imagine an adult not knowing the difference between a tuxedo and a lounge suit. Maybe I'm being naive........
     
  18. MisterCairo

    MisterCairo I'll Lock Up

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    I agree, most would know the difference between a tux and a lounge suit given pictoral comparisons, but how many would know the difference between white tie and black tie?

    And ask 100 people what a "lounge suit" is, and I guarantee it, 99 will say "you know, a leisure suit" - even the nomenclature is foreign to the "average" person.

    We're on the same page - in an era where clean blue jeans, deck shoes and a collared, untucked shirt is considered "dressy" (I've seen this at weddings; I've NEVER seen white tie in person), any form of attire beyond that will be regarded as semi-formal, formal, pick your terminology. I do think it over confident to suggest the person on the street is remotely aware of the distinctions in dress, probably due to lack of context (they never go to the events where one would find such attire, and are never exposed to media, film, books, etc., where such distinctions are discussed or shown).

    Just look at the threads here in the lounge where the subtle distinctions between white and black tie are debated, even the type of "proper" lapel for a tuxedo (was that ever resoloved - shall versus peaked?) is under debate. Can you picture the man on the street being able to partake? I've had to google references to make sure I understand some of the terminology, and I have an interest in the subject!

    In any case, what about pleated pants being a faux pas in the eyes of the internet fashion gurus I linked to? I have never heard of pleats being inherently bad, perhaps not as in vogue, but never a faux pas....
     
  19. Slim Tim

    Slim Tim New in Town

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    I personally think the white tie, black tie issue is entirely ridiculous. I don't dress retro to be "Formal," I dress retro because it LOOKS GOOD. In my opinion, looking good is far more important and personal than following a bunch of BS rules made by snobby, stuck-up people designed to make them feel better than other people. Obviously the way you dress should be respectful, but ridiculing other people just because they don't know what tie is "correct" is elitist and not behavior worthy of a fedora lounger.
     
  20. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    ^^^^


    I haven't a clue to the genesis of this diatribe.......
     

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