Preferred t-shirt model/brand under jacket

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by Bigbenbs, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. ProteinNerd

    ProteinNerd My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Oh you guys are missing out by not having the word dag in your day-to-day vocabulary!!! I recommend you start using it immediately

    The most concise definition of dag would be “un-cool”. It’s usually used affectionately and not really aggressively or meant to be a serious insult.
     
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  2. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    I think there's a logical flaw in the argument. Expensive items are not generally in themselves 'better' than cheaper ones. As I have found empirically again and again, if you are careful in selecting items, a $10 t-shirt may well outlast and out perform a $100 or $300 t-shirt. Mostly when I have been given expensive clothing or have seen it, it has been a disappointment.

    I'm not denying that there are cheap clothes that are bad and disposable - which are overpriced even at five bucks.

    With many expensive items you are paying mainly for branding. Of course there are some costly items that are indeed well made and durable and long lasting too, but I guess all I'm saying is you don't need to spend money to find these qualities. There was a Bonds t-shirt I used to buy that cost around $5 and I am still wearing some of these 20 years later on a regular rotation - hundreds of washes later. You wouldn't want a better garment.

    The expensive hand made artisan leather jacket is a whole different phenomenon to overpriced underwear. While I no longer own any custom leather (i have simplified my wardrobe) I get that a hand made item will be priced accordingly.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2018
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  3. navetsea

    navetsea Call Me a Cab

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    I too think things are priced to emphasise quality. Especially on nieche market like this, it sells because people believe it worth the price tag also because it is very limited.... so it works for these items like raw denim, vintage inspired shirt/tshirt, leather jackets, 1/6 licensed plastic toy figurines of ironmen, etc.

    Sure they wont get away with sub quality products, it should be better visually than just mall clothings or children toys. But their price tag has no proportion to their increased quality. I mean how these expensive figures get discoloration or rotting from uv just standing on the shelf while children toys priced 1/10th of it survives the abuse of daily playing, or how expensive denim developed holes and rip within 2yrs while being monitored daily, carefully washed or dipped in the bath, supposedly low quality mall jeans 1/3rd of their price survives machine washing for multiple years. I dont believe in brands anymore.
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2018
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  4. mihai

    mihai One of the Regulars

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    Because most consumers are brand conscious, industry is very precise nowadays. Online offers a huge amount of data over consumer preferences. Very few have the time/will to educate themselves. I also don't believe in brands since a long time. From small things to big ones like cars. If smth makes more sense I'll go for it.

    This expensive denim that doesn't last long perhaps is deliberately so. Fans want clothes that develop "character". Can you have character on Wrangler 13mwz that are indistructable and cost 30 bucks? Same with leather jackets that must develop "patina". I always get a sad feeling when a tortured jacket(to get patina quickly) shows up. I've seen a couple of LW ones that owner tried to distress them and looked crumpled, messed up.
     
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  5. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Yes you can. Wrangler 13 MWZ's age really well and farly quickly look faded and mottled.
     
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  6. ton312

    ton312 I'll Lock Up

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    I prefer my things to look as new as possible for as long as possible. The one exception being indigo garments. I like the electric blue fades on heavy denim but I certainly don't want those on my black jeans. I want them to stay jet black. Same with leather jackets. I'm not a fan of drape or soft leather. I prefer that the jacket retain its shape and fend off the break in for as long as possible. I think that's largely why I'm more attracted to heavy leather. Once a jacket starts to become too soft I lose interest in it. My favorite time with a new jacket is the first few weeks, when it's pristinely new and completely rigid. It's counter intuitive b/c they certainly don't look their best at this stage but to me they do feel the best.
     
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  7. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    That's really interesting, Ton. I've never heard that from anyone before. I want my leather to feel like tough fabric and not like the 'suit of armour' some prefer. I don't live the kind of life where a suit of armour is necessary or desirable. I think the main reason I like leather is because it's easy to wipe off the food stains. :D
     
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  8. Monitor

    Monitor I'll Lock Up

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    Ditto.

    You'd love that Vanson Lee I just bought. Actually, that's the reason why I love it. It's exactly like a stone statue of a leather jacket, even the creases and the folds. I don't even know how the previous owner got 'em to appear but the jacket's like a brand new CXL in the dead of a winter. Maybe the first true suit of armor I've ever had.
     
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  9. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Hanes Beefy Ts. They do long and short sleeve versions and mine have lasted for years. I also like Pendleton shirts and the less floridly pockety Dickies for trousers. I chop the labels off the outsides and can get away with wearing them all the time. A black pair has retained colour for 5 years despite numerous washes and lots of time in the sun.
     
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  10. Carlos840

    Carlos840 Call Me a Cab

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    Pictures or it doesn't exist!

    edit: man, is it the Cheyenne you posted in the other thread?
    That looks amazing, sleeves are insane!
     
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  11. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    Barring Aeros, Hanes t-shirts and Dickies work trousers, all the longest-lasting stuff I've owned has been either minor brand or actual knock-offs. This has been especially true of shirts and shoes- a case in point would be the rather expensive hand-made boots I ordered from a UK company whose soles are already thinning down after maybe 5 or 6 wears, whereas my comparatively cheap Shanghai-purchased Doc Martens are still on my feet for hours every week (and have never needed any resoling) eight years after purchase. Branding is a funny thing- I really reckon that cheaper jeans last me longer than more expensive ones.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
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  12. red devil

    red devil One Too Many

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    Only had the chance to read this thread now, very interesting to see where it is going.

    In my case, it's been through cycles, I got into jeans and jackets at the same time. Only difference, is that I was happy with pretty much one pair of jeans but started immediately researching more jacket styles wanting more.

    Getting my first pair of IH jeans was an eye opener, I liked the fact that I had to break them in and also the overall feel of the fabric. It had "weight" and "character" in a certain way. Also did last longer than what I was using before. It is a clothing item I am currently exploring albeit not as doggedly as jackets.

    When it comes to T-shirts, I am not investing much in these, I generally look for reasonably well made ones at affordable ones that have some fun & quirky graphics. It just works with my overall style at the moment. But @Superfluous' take on t-shirts is really interesting, I will look into this. I wonder if I will get a similar "revelation" to the one I had with denim.

    I guess for most men who care about their clothing, the top 2 items that they would spend most on are jackets and footwear.
     
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  13. Peacoat

    Peacoat I'll Lock Up

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    I like the Pluma brand of T-shirt as it is heavy and well built. I prefer a long sleeve T with a down vest under my Fox Creek MC jacket with the liner in. With that combination, I can practice slow speed maneuvers and not even know I am wearing more than a T shirt. Tails are always tucked.
     
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  14. handymike

    handymike I'll Lock Up

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    Johnson Motors makes great "slubby cotton" t shirts. If you shop around you can find them without the graphics.
     
  15. tropicalbob

    tropicalbob My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    I'm surprised nobody's mentioned striped sailor shirts for wearing under leather jackets. It's a traditional biker look going back to the '60's: you see it a lot in old biker movies. Armor-lux are my favorites, but St. James are also nice if you get the full-sleeve ones. Also, there are a couple of shops on Etsy that sell Russian military clothing and have them for about $15.00. These are close fitting and would be perfect for wearing under a sweater while bike riding. They look great under a denim shirt as well.
     
  16. Superfluous

    Superfluous My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Yes and no. It strikes me that one should spend the most on clothing items that one wears the most often. My top quality tuxedo was a complete waste of money and, in retrospect, I should have purchased something far less stellar. In contrast, my top quality sneakers are great investments because I wear them often.

    Of course, the clothing we wear most often is entirely a function of our climate. Where I live, t-shirts are worn year round as a front line article of clothing, and sweaters are rarely worn. Conversely, for many here, sweaters are among the most commonly worn clothing items and, therefore, worthy of significant investment. For others, sweatshirts/hoodies are a priority and worthy of investment.

    Dress codes/restraints also dictate what we wear most often. Some here wear suits to work, while others wear jeans. Some here can wear leather jackets to work, while others cannot.

    My fixation on leather jackets is completely antithetical to my climate and makes little sense. Given how few opportunities I have to wear my leather jackets, I should own only one or two. My love affair with flannels is equally unwarranted. In contrast, my focus on t-shirts and sneakers makes perfect sense given my climate and dress habits.

    I really should live in a colder climate more suitable to my wardrobe and the clothing I love. Is it completely nuts that I would dream of living in another city/region solely so that I could wear that clothing I prefer? My question is rhetorical.

    Based on the foregoing, I agree that, for many/most, footwear investments make sense. After all, we wear footwear with everything. On the other hand, jacket investments do not make sense for everyone. That said, everything gets thrown out the window when irrational clothing obsessions prevail over sensibility driven by real world considerations.
     
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  17. zebedee

    zebedee One Too Many

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    I am fairly fortunate in that I can move to climates that suit specific clothing if I wish to, but I would not move to a climate where I could never wear a jacket for at least two months a year.
     
  18. Bigbenbs

    Bigbenbs A-List Customer

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    I live in Northern Europe. I can wear jackets for roughly 10 months a year, and sometimes even more, if you get one of those strangely cold summer weeks.
     
  19. Monitor

    Monitor I'll Lock Up

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    That's the one, yep!
     
  20. Townes1974

    Townes1974 New in Town

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    If this is the style you are looking for (shorter body, sleeves, and wide collar) then you should try Big Hop. I have been wearing this particular shirt for more than a year, and it has been machine washed and dried at least 30 times. It fits exactly the way it did the first time I put it on, and the price is reasonable.
     

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