Show off the sports coats.

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Matt Deckard, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    Yes, sorry about that, I misunderstood. You were talking about corduroy and peak lapels.

    Well, nowadays peak lapels are considered more formal than notch lapels (and I tend to agree at least in part) but this was not necessarily true in the past. In Golden era there were tweed jackets with peak lapels!

    However, to be honest I have never seen a corduroy jacket which dates before 1970, so I think that the jacket shown above can be safely assumed to be either from the 70s or from the late 90s.
     
    MondoFW likes this.
  2. The Necktie Guy

    The Necktie Guy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    Speaking of peak lapel tweed jackets, there's this particular one I've been watching since last year.
    (Jacket is likely from the 1990's-early 2000's)

    Made in Italy
    Brand is Davide Cenci.
    Cenci has been around since 1926, for three generations. Today, they have 3 stores.
    Their flagship store is in Rome, Italy. 2nd store in Milan, Italy. Their 3rd and only shop in America is in New York City, which opened in 1982. Consensus on Davide Cenci has been positive.

    Current price is $99.95. I've seen it go down to either $84 or $79, which is the lowest I've seen it go. But it's not very often when the listing goes on sale.
    This is currently the only jacket I've seen that's closest to my body measurements. Anything else that I find online or in person is way too big for me.
    Jacket is 90% Wool and 10% Cashmere. The lining is 100% Rayon.
    The back is ventless.

    So, should I go for it? Or should I wait a while?

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    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
    PeterB and Michael A like this.
  3. MondoFW

    MondoFW Practically Family

    Messages:
    852
    If it will fit you fine without any alterations, go for it. I would be skeptical of paying otherwise.
     
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  4. Canadian

    Canadian One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    186
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    I have an alternative statement. If you feel it will fill a need in your cupboard, and it fits you with minimal fuss, buy it.
     
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  5. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    I add up to the positive comments you have heard of Davide Cenci. Things from that era were extremely good quality, that jacket could well be fully canvassed since tailoring for Davide Cenci was made by Saint Andrews or Belvest (among others) at high standards. There should be lots of handwork too. The fabric composition tells that this jacket will be extremely soft to the touch, I believe that with such a texture it will be luxurious.

    If it fits you well in the key points, that price is absolutely worth it. You can have it altered to fit you better later.
     
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  6. VintageEveryday

    VintageEveryday A-List Customer

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    383
    Location:
    Woodside, NY
    Label says Dunhill
     
  7. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    Even better. Dunhill made in Italy garments were made by Zegna and Caruso - the latter one produces amongst the best quality OTR garments in the world.
     
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  8. The Necktie Guy

    The Necktie Guy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    I saw another jacket that's close to my body measurements. It's a double vent, single breasted jacket. I have no clue of this jacket's quality.

    Description says it was found new with tags at a tailor shop that closed. Jacket was made for Yves Saint Laurent in the 1970's. It's currently $98 with free shipping.

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    I was comparing this to the Davide Cenci double breasted jacket I saw earlier. The double breasted jacket from Davide Cenci was measured as a 33S (measured 18.5 inches from pit to pit, so I guess it's 37 inches if we double the number).

    The Saint Lauret is listed as a 34S (36 inch chest measurement). My chest measures about 34 inches. Would there be a significant difference between the two measurements?

    Also, the shoulders of both jackets measure 16 inches, which is my natural shoulder width.

    If I could have it my way, I would buy both. But I could only afford one at this moment. Would the Davide Cenci jacket be the better buy, or the YSL one?
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2018
  9. MondoFW

    MondoFW Practically Family

    Messages:
    852
    Maybe a suit expert can correct me on this, but I don't think your suit's shoulders should be the exact same width as your natural shoulder length, for ease of mobility. A 17''-17.5'' shoulder would likely look and feel better.
     
  10. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    This jacket has the typical look of late 70s garments, that is a rather tame appearance but with those distinctive traits that make it immediately recognizable as 70s and not 80s (high button stance, narrow shoulders, fitted waist with flared skirt). In my opinion it looks very dated and I wouldn't wear it, bu if you like it it's okay.

    Quality wise, YSL garments back then were fused, like today. Usually workmanship was rather good, however, and the fabrics were acceptable, with generally good fit - the collar was shaped and the armholes were reasonably high, but that was the norm even in low-end items. I don't know who made their jackets, but as a big house it is likely that they had more than one quality production line, and withouth seeing the label I can't exclude that this one is made of pure natural fibres or not.

    Regarding measurements, the chest may be fine for both; the more fitted one, however, will look cleaner as long as the shoulders fit. Regarding this last point, note that:
    However, I don't agree fully with MondoFW. If your shoulders measure 16'', a 17'' shoulder is the maximum you can have before looking ridiculous (if there are big pads) or even more ridiculous (what happens if you wear a natural shoulder which is too big?). It is true, however, that a too narrow shoulder line will cause great discomfort. So what to do?

    I believe that at least in one of the jacket's auctions, the shoulder has been measured at the blades level and not at the widest point (seam to seam). The best way to clear out is asking the seller to repeat the shoulder measurement straight across the top back, from seam to seam.

    Knowing how 70s jacket were cut, I'd expect that the YSL has 16.5-17'' shoulders (typical of 36 size) and it was altered to narrow chest down, while the other one being a true 34 might have smaller measurement.

    Ultimately, I believe you can fit in both; in my view the DB jacket is a better invesment, but your taste is the last word.

    P.S. If the items can be returned, you can relax and try both!
     
    The Necktie Guy likes this.
  11. Slobo

    Slobo New in Town

    Messages:
    30
    Location:
    Virginia
    That DB Cenci above is a beaut.
     
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  12. The Necktie Guy

    The Necktie Guy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    90
    The more I look at the YSL jacket, the more I see your view of not liking that dated look of the late 70's. I'll buy the Davide Cenci coat as soon as I can.

    I really appreciate your help Mathematicus. Thank you!
     
    Mathematicus likes this.
  13. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    It was a real pleasure! It would be great if we created a thread in which we can exchange similar opinions on our future purchases.
     
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  14. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    Here's an Oxxford sports coat I've lately acquired. The fabric is a brown houndstooth soft and wardm wool (probably with some cashemre in). Outstanding quality, as expected by Oxxford, like hand-work all over, very careful shoulder padding and waist shaping.
    It needs minor alterations to fit me (lengthen and taper sleeves, take in midsection a bit) but otherwise fit is good. Usually I don't like natural shoulders but I do make exceptions for Oxxford's ones.
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    I'm planning to wear it with a turtleneck it the following winter. Any suggestion on the colour choice?
     
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  15. Metatron

    Metatron One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,478
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Lovely jackets, Mike. I am happy to see that good content is still being posted here, I hadn't paid much attention to the FL lately. I will make sure to check in once in a while! Alexandre apparently specialized in making garments for overseas US troops postwar which is why vintage examples are are often found in the US. I think the double patch pockets might be an Americanism as well, a detail not often found on Brit examples of the time.

    You made the right choice, in my opinion the second jacket has a very common look and is way overpriced. You shouldn't have a problem finding something like that for pennies, perhaps it won't be presented as well on a mannequin etc, but you have to look past these things to score bargains. ;) For that price you might also find a reasonably good quality jacket new on sale.

    Math, very classic and understated. Since you have already got a low contrast thing going on I would go for a navy turtleneck as worn by Steve McQueen
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    I've seen Oxxford mentioned a few times in vintage circles, what is the story?
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2018
  16. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    Metatron, thanks for the advice, I'll definitely look forward a navy turtleneck - perhaps with gray/charcoal flannels?

    Oxxford, as far as I know, is one of the "heritage" American brands, whose defining style has hardly changed in the past 60 years. This jacket dates most probably from the end of 80s but I have seen Oxxford tailored pieces from much earlier and much later with the same look. Oxxford clothes are almost entirely hand made and the cut is usually soft and relaxed, yet very elegant and professional. Definitely not a fashion brand.
     
  17. michael78

    michael78 One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    158
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Hi just experimenting the combinations of sports coat and pants, and suit jacket. Camel jacket is by Hughes & Hatcher, dark blue suit jacket by Penney.
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  18. The Jackal

    The Jackal One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    210
    My first sports coat should be arriving today.
    In my efforts to bring my wardrobe up to where it should be, I think this will be the first of many.
    Hopefully it looks/fits like I think and I'll try to post it when it gets here.
     
    Mathematicus likes this.
  19. Mean Eyed Matt

    Mean Eyed Matt A-List Customer

    Messages:
    471
    Location:
    Germany
    The camel one's not bad, but I prefer the blue suit jacket:
    Love the contrast of a dark coat with light pants/flannels.
     
  20. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    I like the cut of the camel one more but I agree that the blue jacket looks much better with light trousers. Try dark charcoal, deep brown or black for the camel one, it will be stunning!
     
    PeterB, michael78 and Mean Eyed Matt like this.

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