Show us their suits

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Matt Deckard, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. Mario

    Mario I'll Lock Up

    My thoughts exactly. The photo could have been taken from the Thugs Like Us book.
     
  2. Metatron

    Metatron One Too Many

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  3. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    Last edited: Jul 5, 2015
  4. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    That's a good look.
     
  5. Fading Fast

    Fading Fast

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    Looking at just the photos on this page (or the page before, if this post jumps to the top of the next page) highlights one of the things I love about clothes from the '30s and '40s - there was so much more texture to them. Today, many suits, sport coats, trousers, overcoats, etc. are finished "smoothly." Most wool items today are very refined in their finish which removes some of the interest and character from the clothes.
     
  6. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Don't you think this guy has a 60s haircut? He looks like a stasi spy.
     
  7. Wolf99

    Wolf99 New in Town

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    When I first saw this photo I was struck by how much might have come from the 60s - the woman's boldly geometric (and presumably brightly coloured) top, the man's single cuff buttons (very Carnaby Street) and the hair cuts - that if someone had said it was a still from thirty years later I would have accepted it.
     
  8. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    Erwin Schrödinger wearing a soft-draping flannel sportcoat/suit with buttoned pocket flap, round neck sweater and bowtie.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    any idea what year ? i would like to see that whole jacket.
     
  10. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    An Austrian website dates it to 1933, which seems correct.
    There are some more photos of him at that occasion, but they are all portraits.

    Some more Schrödinger... another archetype of the intellectual/scientist with scruffy hair, round spectacles, tweed and bowtie.

    1943

    [​IMG]

    Probably also around 1943

    [​IMG]

    And another bowtie portrait... certainly 1928-1932.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2015
  11. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    I am intrigued by all these old photographs. It is possibly worth noting that up until WW2 it was feasible to identify a man's nationality, ,more or less, by the appearance of his clothes. In films and books of the period one comes across detectives guessing whether a man was from Britain or the continent by looking at his suit and hat. As late as 1981, when I first had a suit made, I was asked about preferring the American or European cut. This has probably changed, and I would hazard a guess that Romanians and Germans today, at least those under the age of about 70, probably look like Americans and Englishmen. What do other Loungers think?
     
  12. Hap Hapablap

    Hap Hapablap One of the Regulars

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    Not only that, but hairstyles, as well. On more than one occasion, I have seen in an old book the phrase: to wear one's hair like a German. Meaning long on top and brushed straight back. The idea of national hairstyles is amazing, too! Of course North Korea doesn't count since it's a law!

    I was a little disappointed by my first trip to Europe, and just seeing everyone in Nike t-shirts and fanny packs. I wanted to see "It's a Small World" old-world cultural dress, not just their version of trashy Americans.


     
  13. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    You are right. I recall Munich in the 80s still had some very German clothes in the shops, and a few men wearing leather raincoats, which you never saw in Canada, where I come from. In London in the 70s I recall seeing people in bowler hats and stiff collars in the city and in offices, but not recently. I haven' been in continental Europe in the last 30 years, but suspect clothing has been homogenized. Hair "in the American style" meant a crew cut, back in England in the 70s, as I recall.
     
  14. Rudie

    Rudie Call Me a Cab

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    The American Empire may be in decline, but it is still an empire. It's not only about military bases, waging war against those who won't bend the knee and terror management. Cultural imperialism plays a big part in staying the top dog.
     
  15. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

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    Not so sure about the "national differences" back in the day... fashion was already largely international, although the undeniable differences in tailoring details and certain styles allowed to differentiate (at least to those with an eye for it) between the American, British, French and German "schools of dress". The big trends of fashion and overall cut was pretty much the same all over the world.

    In men's dress the German and British school were internationally the most influential until America eclipsed them in the second half of the 1940's.

    As to hair cuts... look at photos of American, British, German or any other country (where modern dress was worn) from the period... long top and shorter sides was the overall norm.
    Of course there were some more extreme examples of German political and military figures with more pronounced hair-cuts.
     
  16. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    If you went back to the 1930s and 1940s there were other significant differences that could be used to identify people:

    I recall reading a British Army report about the physical differences between British men and Germans: the average British male was significantly smaller than the average German and had comparatively bad teeth.

    But in terms of clothes, I think to people with any experience would have known certain differences. We can still generally say 'that isn't a British jacket' from features like scalloped yokes, buttoning pockets etc. But, as we have seen on this forum, telling the difference between a German and a Finnish suit isn't so easy!
     
  17. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    Back on track with this thread, two interesting poses here: William Powell, always dapper, and a curious shot of George Raft.
    WilliamPowell.jpg
    george_raft_005.jpg
    Raft's jacket is open, unusually, and the trouser rise is lower than usual, so the picture was probably taken in the 40s. Note the lapels.
     
  18. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    And another one with George Raft in what looks like a tweed suit. A genuine clothes horse, Raft's suits seem to have upstaged his acting ability. The camera angle distorts the proportions, but it seems a classic three-button from the 30s.
    raft.jpg
     
  19. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    Sorry, two-button, with the top one fastened. Breast pocket is a patch pocket, and the pocket square looks like a carnation. Is that a spear point collar with a bar? Good width in the thighs and knees of the pants. I get all mine made like that. I tell the tailor that I don't want to feel any cloth on my legs.
     
  20. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

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    Even in a gunfight, Raft manages to look as if he just stepped out of the dressing room. Raft2.jpg . The armhole seems a little low.
     

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