Show us your British suits

Discussion in 'Suits' started by avedwards, Jan 7, 2011.

  1. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    i've seen that done quite often on the facings of British suits; all to do with getting the maximum amount of pieces out of the minimum fabric.
     
  2. Eddie Derbyshire

    Eddie Derbyshire Practically Family

    Messages:
    849
    Location:
    Riddings, Derbyshire, UK
    So common AND fabric saving ;) Thanks for the info.

    For me the button placing is ideal - I love when the bottom button is in line with the pockets. And the lapels are solid but not too ostentatious. It's a perfect suit for me! If only if only...
     
  3. Nick D

    Nick D Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,166
    Location:
    Upper Michigan
    Archibald Whife briefly mentions different ways to make joined facings in The Art of Garment Making, but he didn't like them. "Joined facings, it should be stressed, are not to be commended. Most good tailoring houses will make sure that their coat-makers are supplied with enough cloth to make it convenient for them to cut the facings whole." p. 76
     
  4. Scottbrad94

    Scottbrad94 New in Town

    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    Sydney
    @ Eddie Derbyshire If you do end up selling it I would more than happily take that suit off your hands. I've been averse to buying dark coloured suits for ages sticking to greys, blues, browns, but I would gladly start my collection of dark suiting with that one haha. That is if it's 37/38 but I understand someone already made an offer so I'll wait in line if you do happen to let it go :)

    also @ Estaban68 I feel like since that badge has been on that jacket for so long if you took it off perhaps there might be some marking on the fabric, especially if the bullion is particularly heavy? Either way a great find :), it's wonderful when you find beautiful things for dirt cheap. I recently found a Saville Row overcoat from the late 30's/early 40s with horn buttons, peak lapel and raglan shoulders for $15 AUD. My eyes nearly popped out of my head when I found that one.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2015
  5. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Abu Dhabi
    Eddie, keep it for the collection. You may have a grandson one day, and who will teach him about the golden age, if not you?
     
  6. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    5,456
    Location:
    London, UK
    Eddie, sell it on - let someone else enjoy it!
     
  7. Mathematicus

    Mathematicus A-List Customer

    Messages:
    378
    Location:
    Coventry, UK
    I agree with Two Types - sell it! Nothing is worse than having a stunning suit in your closet that's to small to wear.
    I'm not sure I can fit into this, I'm a 36-37 with loooong legs XD
     
  8. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    decisions decisions Eddie?
     
  9. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    some British suits onstage at the Windmill Theatre 1939-40:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Abu Dhabi
    Fantastic picture. The check jacket on the left looks quite short, and reminds me more of the 20s. Or am I mistaken? The grey one on the right and the black in the middle look more like typical 30s. Trousers on the black one seem very wide for the period, particularly below the knees.
     
  11. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,022
    Location:
    East Sussex, England
    PeterB,

    there's no real difference between the length of late '20s British jackets and '30s ones (the '30s look' effectively starts in the UK in 1927).

    early '20s Brit jackets will tend to be slightly (but not much) on the longer side. the 'bottom heaviness' usually emphasised by narrower shoulders and a wider skirt. e.g:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Abu Dhabi
    Thanks HBK. I see what you mean in the picture.
     
  13. Metatron

    Metatron One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,470
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    In fact the relatively short jackets are quite representative of 1930s fashions.
     
  14. Dirk Wainscotting

    Dirk Wainscotting A-List Customer

    Messages:
    355
    Location:
    Irgendwo
    It should be remembered that prior to the 1950s (and a bit later) people didn't 'upgrade' their clothing quite as rapidly as nowadays. The selective photographic record of people wearing the natty fashions of a particular decade doesn't represent the general population by any means. There will have been men wearing jackets and suits acquired at least a decade previously.

    In 1980 I remember my grandad wearing tweed coats he had on in photos from the 1960s (but was a tight-fisted bugger at the best of times!).
     
  15. PeterB

    PeterB One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Abu Dhabi
    Great suit, Esteban, looks like one that I have from Austin Reed. Got it second hand in the early 90s, and reckoned it for late 60s to early 70s. Has the same slight curve on the lapels.
     
  16. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,351
    Location:
    New Forest
    That blazer is a great find, and for three quid, you can't go wrong. A trader would give you a lot more.
    Sometime ago, Two Types posted a heads up with regards to a vintage trader in Bournemouth, name of Clobber. My wife and I have a second home about 15 miles north of Bournemouth, whilst staying there recently, we ventured into Bournemouth and came across Clobber. What a treasure trove. The guy wanted twenty quid for this blazer, I told him that it was a bit too tight. He said that I could wear it with the buttons undone and that he would take a tenner. Couldn't resist it.

    [​IMG]
     
    PeterB, esteban68 and Speakeasy like this.
  17. Speakeasy

    Speakeasy Familiar Face

    Messages:
    63
    Location:
    Toronto
    GHT, that blazer is superb with those spectators!
     
  18. esteban68

    esteban68 Call Me a Cab

    That's a nice blazer GHT , I'd have bought it no problem even at twenty quid.....as for wearing it open who buttons up a jacket not I for sure...never!
    Friends have a property in Bournemouth and we've been invited early in New year, they've mentioned Clobber a couple of times so it's definitely on the cards for a visit!
     
  19. Fastuni

    Fastuni Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,201
    Location:
    Germany
    A British suit made to American fashions for an US serviceman ca. 1950-53.
    Typical late-1940, early-1950's cut... high "Hollywood" waist, slightly tapered trousers, wide lapels and broad shoulders.
    "Alexandre of Oxford Street London" is catering since 1950 especially to US soldiers.

    The cloth is an incredibly soft and comfy rich-blue flannel.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    PeterB likes this.
  20. GHT

    GHT I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,351
    Location:
    New Forest
    Did Carnaby Street, the explosion of pop culture, the here today, gone tomorrow Mod fashions of the early 60's, kill of all those High Street tailors? I remember Alexandre, John Collier, Burtons, Austin Reed, Dunn & Co, Weaver to Wearer, Joseph Hepworth and so many more. Hepworths morphed into the Next stores and Austin Reed survived, but with the demise of those Menswear stores came the dumbing down of any sort of formal attire. Today, even a suited executive gets stared at like he's a freak.
     

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