The Mindset Lists

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by Shangas, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. Gingerella72

    Gingerella72 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    429
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    I'm guilty as charged for being an adult who doesn't use cursive. I've always disliked my cursive handwriting, no matter how much I practiced I could never get it to look 'right' or 'pretty'. And then entering college in 1990, printed computer papers were de rigueur and emails replaced handwritten letters and cards so I didn't have much use for it. My handwriting kind of morphed into its own blend of some print letters, some connected letters. But at the same time, I'm sad that cursive is dying in schools. Hypocritical, I know.

    ETA: I remember being a child and pretending to write cursive, and being so excited when I got to 3rd grade and started learning it. It was seen as one of the progressive steps to growing up. Wow, I can read and write cursive, look at me, all adult and stuff. ;) What do kids have now to replace that thrill of being old enough to do something? In the grade school years, that is.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013
  2. fashion frank

    fashion frank One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,175
    Location:
    Woonsocket Rhode Island
    I had to laugh when you added the "in the grade school years, that is' !

    I just for the life of me can't get over the fact that it is not taught anymore as Stray Cat pointed out , how do they sign their name on say a check for example.

    It's amazing how the "future" has replaced something like that because of a computer and not having to write anything down anymore.
    Computers killed handwriting ,cell phones have killed telephone booths ,velcro sneakers have killed tying your shoes, emails have killed the U.S.P.S and the list goes on ,somehow we as a people are moving forward , go figure ???

    All the Best ,Fashion Frank
     
  3. Gingerella72

    Gingerella72 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    429
    Location:
    Nebraska, USA
    Well, there's plenty of growing up milestones that are met in the teenage years....wearing makeup for the first time, first date, getting driver's license, registering to vote....but learning cursive was sort of the 'first' big milestone for a child. At least it was when I was growing up. I wanted to differentiate between the early chilldhood years, and the teenage years.
     
  4. Stray Cat

    Stray Cat My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Checks too, are obsolete in Modern Days. [huh]
    I fear we're getting back in time, when people were signing their names with a thumb-print. That IS where we are heading, no?
    Sounds both silly and sad: so many people dedicated their lives to "bring the writing to the children" - remember the Missionaries who traveled across half the World so that the children could receive a chance to learn to read and write? Somehow, I feel we are letting all them down if we just give up on the written word..
    ([size=-2]I'm getting sentimental here[/size]) :D

    No one "doesn't know" to write cursive.. there are just people who practice, and those who DON'T. :D


    Call me Don Quijote! lol
     
  5. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    This reminds me of an old joke that went something like this: A mother and father are waiting at home for news of their daughter's first child. Their daughter and her husband live in another state, so the two couples concocted a special code to avoid having to pay the long distance phone call charges. Finally their telephone rang, and when the father answered it the operator at the other end asked, "Will you accept a long-distance call from Mr. Hadthebabyitsaboy?" :D

    The same goes for me. I taught myself to write using cursive before I entered Kindergarten and, as is common with self-taught abilities, incurred some "bad habits" that I never bothered to overcome. I can write cursive, but my printing is much more legible so I reserve cursive for my signature.

    Eventually we'll return to the days of the uneducated when the phrase "make your mark" was commonplace. That's progress for you! lol
     
  6. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,243
    Location:
    Northern California
    Times have definitely changed since I began teaching twenty years ago. Not only is our clientele different so is our job description. A lot of this change is due to the popularity of ghetto culture and the t-ball mindset (everyone gets a hit, scores are not kept, and no one loses).
    :D
     
  7. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,111
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I just got back from my family doctor. It's true, they can't write. He filled out a medical form for me. I wonder if the recipient will be able to read a single letter of it...
     
  8. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    I sometimes wonder if people in the medical profession have their own version of shorthand, but they don't tell anyone about it.
     
  9. Touchofevil

    Touchofevil

    Messages:
    12,243
    Location:
    Northern California
    I too have wondered the same thing in my anything-can-be-made-in-to-a conspiracy-mind-I-say-jokingly.
    How else do my prescriptions get filled?
    :D
     
  10. I remember reading about hospitals having penmanship seminars for their doctors a few years back.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  11. Shangas

    Shangas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    6,111
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    "Right boys, to earn your medical degrees, you must finally, complete this penmanship course. Only absolute failure will be accepted as a passing grade..."
     
  12. Stray Cat

    Stray Cat My Mail is Forwarded Here

    I'm sure of it!
    It always puzzled me: how on earth does the lady in the Pharmacy read THAT?!
    (I worry one day I'll return home with a fungus cream instead of eye-drops) lol
     
  13. Undertow

    Undertow My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,127
    Location:
    Des Moines, IA, US
    Boy, I remember when my sister and I had to take two tin buckets a piece and walk 1 mile down hill to the water pump, fill both buckets each and then come back without spilling a drop. And these danged kids don't even appreciate a "drop in a bucket"! Heck, they probably think "buckets" are just some kinda fancy racin' bench in their hot-rod Duesenbergs! :rolleyes:

    All I know is that every generation of Americans since the 20th century has:

    1. Faced some foreign boogeyman - and actually believed the propaganda
    2. Thinks they had it harder than the new guy
    3. Come to accept that the US will be perpetually involved in one "justified" holy crusade after another
    4. Had to accept that they aren't the "Have's", and privately admitted they're wealthier than the "Have Not's" (buy maybe not by much!)
    5. Bought the notion that America is somehow at the center of world history since at least WWII
    6...
    7... [huh]

    Carbon paper? Cursive writing? Typewriters? Of course kids don't know about these things. I don't know a damn thing about smart phones, and I don't care if I die without learning how to use one; that's not much different.

    If a kid is interested in history, they will learn about all of these things, and more. Let's just HOPE we have more kids interested in history!
     
  14. tuppence

    tuppence Practically Family

    Messages:
    532
    Location:
    Hellbourne Australia
    Your doctor is very old-fashioned, mine prints everything out.

    Sadly, when I was in High School, they offered 'Computer' as an optional class. I decided not to do them, because I thought they wouldn't last.
     
  15. tuppence

    tuppence Practically Family

    Messages:
    532
    Location:
    Hellbourne Australia
    I received a Thank You note from an older couple after I helped them when they had become locked out of their house. I had to get my Mother to help me read it. She told me, that style of writing changed when she was 16, around 1956, and when she went back to school , everybody still at school at to re-learn how to write. I think the older style of writing is very attractive as long as you are a neat writer.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.