wash your jeans?

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by navetsea, Dec 28, 2018.

  1. rocketeer

    rocketeer Call Me a Cab

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    Sorry J, I just don't get the scruffy look, there are worn in jeans and worn out, like old leather jackets and other apparel, to me there is a dividing line between rubbish and cool but worn ripped out jeans and hats on sideways or back to front do not come into it and neither do jeans hanging low because you want to show off you undies.
    Who knows where these fashions started and why. I don't want to dress like a 60 year old of our fathers era but I certainly don't want to dress like todays teenagers.
    Well, thats my opinion for my styles anyway ;)
     
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  2. zebedee

    zebedee Practically Family

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    I gave my Pike Bros hunting pant (sounds bizarre: somewhere between 'Looking for underwear' and 'Not fast enough to catch 'im') a wash in cold water rinse-spin with no detergent and then dried them outside - no shrinking and no colour loss. I reckon I could get away with washing them like that every other month and just not wear them as much. I have Levi 501s that I bought used and they get a wash every week. I've never washed a leather jacket or even the lining- they've never needed it. Other jackets I've had (non-leather) get washed reasonably regularly, but the climates I usually live in mean I'm not wearing a jacket most of the year, and, if I am, it's probably over a layer or two or I'm too cold to perspire too much.

    Generally I think that people should wear whatever they're comfortable in and not try to force themselves into older or younger styles- I don't intend to stop wearing leather jackets until I'm good and ready to, but unless jeans are a really dark blue or black, I can't really get away with them post-39.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
  3. rocketeer

    rocketeer Call Me a Cab

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    Washing a leather jacket may sound ok as they usually survive a rainstorm, but you could end up with a great looking jacket and maybe a not so great looking wavy zip? Even a cool wash can shrink the cotton tape. I know as I speak from experience
    :(
     
  4. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    I lean to the view that it's all about comfort, personal preference, and authenticity. I get away with somestuff that other people might not beccause it's not being worn as a costume, it's just me - and the same goes for all of us. I've often had theexperience of being the only guy in a suit and tie in the room, but noone as ever queried it because it's just my thing. (Conversely, if on the rare occasion I wear a pair of jeans to the office, like today, it getsnoticed at all it's because it's not common on me. In reality, tough, few mention it for the simple reason that I don't make a thing of it, I wear 'em like I own them, so it never gets queried.

    My authenticity point and it being about being yourself was seen writ large in an academic conference community of which I am a part. A few years, a decade and more ago, there wre two guys who both turned up in an old t-shirt and jeans, and a pair of sandals. Both uber-casual in the context of a conference where the tie-and-non-denim wearers like me are relatively rare already. The first guy ,well, that's just how he dressed and nobody cared. The other guy, well... it was all a bit studied. Everyone knew he was dressed for effect, and it showed. The first guy was well -liked and accepted, the latter was not taken seriously as an academic. Met them both again in recent yers. The first is donig well, still dressing as he did while a PhD student. The latter is also doing well, but nowadays he wears a suit. ;)
     
  5. zebedee

    zebedee Practically Family

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    Yup- I just wouldn't wash a leather jacket out of concern.

    I am fairly lucky in that I can wear smart casual to teach in. As I generally work with a host of other nonconformist types anyway, it would be odd if at least a quarter of us didn't break some dress guideline twice a week or so.
     
  6. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    I remember right up until I startyed having more say in buying my own clothes (around about the time I first paid much attention to them, probably around theage of twelve in 1986ish), jeans were always a very dark blue, darker even than most indigo you see on sale nowadays. I'd love it if I could get a pair of denims that would start and stay that colour! I do tend to think that washed out or lighter denims are aging, tough that's probably because I associate them with a particular era where style was not in abundance as a general rule - the eighties. I do remember a time when darker denim of the sort I favour now would have been sneered at as 'old man clothes'. Again, though, I think it all comes back to hat you're comfortable in. It's probably a big plus for me that my final style-regeneration was into a vintage look, rather than the common thing of hitting one's mid-thities and then wearing hatever was in style then for the rest of your life. There are women in my parents' church who still dress like Diana Spencer circa 1981, and I'm not sure thatwas a good look een then!
     
  7. zebedee

    zebedee Practically Family

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    I was quite lucky to have been in Asia from about 23 to almost 40. I have absolutely no idea about what's fashionable in the UK (I remember thinking that the first person I saw wearing skinny jeans was terminally ill) and either wear a suit when I have to or am shirt/trousers smart casual. When I threw out a lot of surplus clothing I think I acquired some kind of general uniform of darker-coloured shirts and light or dark chinos.
     
  8. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Funny thing is, I realise I couldn't tell you in the abstract what's fashionable in the UK now, though I would recognise it in context. I do think when you get to our age, though, most people know what they like, or at least if they are still being told what to wear, they're chasing 'style' as a concept rather than fashion. In a place like tis, here we are al interested in clothes, I tend to assume it's different, though when you look at the blog world.... the so-called classic style bloggers are as riven with rules as the worst of the fashion set. The weirdest thing I find though is the bloggers' typical obsession with whether things are "masculine". I mean, surely the only question there is are you man enough to wear hat you like, or do you crave the security of some sort of rules? I'm sure Ben Franklin would have had words for that.... ;)
     
  9. Big J

    Big J Call Me a Cab

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    @rocketeer, nah, I don't particularly think the scruffy look is good (I don't wear ripped jeans or t-shirts with holes in), but I was just trying to say that if you do wear clothes like that because of your lifestyle (riding every day, arc-welding, or something like that) then it's really 'you' and not what you wear to pretend you're 'rough' to other people.
    It's just that thing you can see in Asia a lot; people who came out to 'teach' for a couple of years but ended up stuck in a loop of repeating the same thing every year and showing no signs of maturing as a person (in a healthy way) nor recognizing that they are not 25 forever.
    Swift wrote in Gulliver's Travels about a race who were immortal. Immortality sounds great until you realize it means centuries of social, cultural and linguistic marginalization. And in that way, there's a significant demographic of white western men in Asia who are showing us the dark reality of being Peter Pan- the little boy who never grew up.
    Edward, I and others here have discussed the idea of 'authentic' self-aware styling and merely chasing fashion trends many times before. I don't slam anyone for wearing dad jeans (being a good dad is way more important than having good jeans), not that I'd want to wear dad jeans, but guys who do aren't generally pretentious followers of teen fashion as a function of midlife crisis denial types.
    If anyone reading this is 25, slim, and wearing the tightest jeans and t-shirt available, then more power to you!
    But if you're desperately doing it to catch the eye of 25 year old ladies at 40, then maybe you need a reality check- every 25 year old or younger lady who tried to pick me up since I passed 40 did it for my personality (I know, right? But it's true), and not because I was the 'hippest old guy in town'.
    Anyway, walked into Raffles Hotel Long Bar in a natural linen suit and pale blue cotton shirt today. It was 32C outside but felt like it was 42C due to the humidity. The place was packed with white anglophone tourists in shorts and t-shirts who were melting, and Japanese tourists who presumably know that the hotel was Kempeitai HQ during the occupation (although I'm guessing they are oblivious to the fact that it was also a rape center, ooops, 'comfort' station also). Needless to say Mrs. J and myself were the center of attention and the staff pampered us stupid. Why do tourists walk around Singapore when air conditioned taxis are so cheap?
     
  10. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

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    Fashion sense and aging is an interesting topic. I don't tend to think it is chasing anything, and I also don't think it is as simple as stagnation. For men in particular, I feel it is both simple and complex*. Most men I know think and process information and situations in the same way they did when they were 20 years old, or whenever their largest burst of formation occurred. When we finally find a level of comfort in ourselves. That shouldn't imply they're immature, either. For some, it was their heyday of high school. For many, it was their college years as they were exposed to the greatest amount of new stimuli. For others, it was their first job and the awakening that entails. But basically, in their youth of some period. Fast-forward to 40 or 50 years old, that old cliché of a mid-life crisis is a real thing because outside factors (usually) finally wear them down into thinking they should be behaving, and processing, some other way. But what way? Total chaos and confusion, and many seem to grasp onto the easiest and most convenient stereotypes...because when you find yourself lost, a road already traveled doesn't sound so bad. And you know, culture is a powerful thing.

    *I also think it has a lot to do with physiological things, but that's for another time.

    Funny that the talk is about Asia. I worked with a fella who lived most of his adult life in I think Thailand. I don't believe he was an educator. Maybe an entrepreneur of some sort. His most glaring trait, as often discussed by many of his co-workers, was that he dressed like a character out of 70's TV. I was willing to bet he dressed exactly the same his entire adult life, and to society, that caught up with him. He looked ridiculous, as many said. It was something I too noticed about him, but my judgment wasn't quite so harsh. It did make me wonder though. Now that I'm the age of his example, I see myself doing the same thing. The things I like to wear are the same things I've always liked to wear. That's my vision of myself. And because of things like the internet and ebay, it's easy to keep acquiring that old fashion.

    Anyway...yeah...there's a lot to fashion and sense. It's fascinating.
     
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  11. zebedee

    zebedee Practically Family

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    It's also interesting that in some cultures there is no such thing as a mid-life crisis.
     
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  12. Ernest P Shackleton

    Ernest P Shackleton Practically Family

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    It's a luxury of sorts. But then so are options of all types, be them conscious or subconscious.
     
  13. Woodtroll

    Woodtroll Practically Family

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    Perfectly stated, and as it should be. If we were "keeping up with fashion" would we be wearing fedoras? I wear what I like - the things that make me comfortable. I don't consciously dress to make a statement, but what I wear does reflect who I am, where I grew up, and the work that I have done throughout my life. These high-heeled logger boots on my feet are not for show - I wore them as a farm boy, as a forester as a young man, and now I wear them as a fire captain. They are my daily wear, even on my days off, and I do wear nicer ones or more worn ones depending on the setting. I will continue to wear them after my retirement in a couple of years because I like them and find comfort in the solid support they have given me through all these years spent on my feet.

    If you're looking at me, shaking your head (visibly or not), remember that I'm probably doing the same thing to you. :D But honestly, if you're happy, do you really care what I think about your fashion sense?

    Y'all take care,
    Regan
     
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  14. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

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    Ever since I was a kid growing up from the early 1960s to now, it's always been Levi's for me. I've worn a variety of them, 501s, 517s, 505s, 513s,...and now, the 505 Levi's Stretch. Best jeans I ever wore. The 505 stretch has the same heavyweight denim feel that it always had except that it's much more comfortable to wear and seems to be more durable than the older and more stiff 505s. The stretch material takes a lot of the stress off the seams. I still wear 505s every day and they seem to be making them better. Back in the day it took quite a while to break in a pair of Levi's to where they were loosened up and comfortable to wear. There's no break in time with the Levi's Stretch. They're good to go right off the shelf. As far as washing, warm water / cold rinse with liquid fabric softener and then toss them in the dryer. No problem. Comes out great every time.
     
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  15. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    In my 50's I often wear the same clothes what I wore when I was 20. In fact I am the same weight as I was then so a couple of blazers have survived the decades.

    I had a thing for cord/tweed blazers/trousers. Still do. Strange thing is now I am in my fifties people expect a blazer and cords. When I was 20 people often thought it was odd. A good example of the same clothing sending different (and unintended) messages.
     
  16. navetsea

    navetsea Call Me a Cab

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    In my 20s i wear tshirt and slack pants or shapeless jeans bought too big and hi cut chunky nike basketball shoes the same style i wear since elementary school, then on my early 30s I wear tshirt and slimmer cut pants and slip on shoes, and then online shopping came and i got to know skinnier side of clothing and boots, and been trying different things. But some that I adopted as my personal look is big turtleneck long sleeve tshirt that can be worn as a cowl over my head, zip up boots, and snug leather jacket. For pants denim jeans or cargo or camouflage i dont have preference among them but as long as they fit long enough to cover the entire boots and not ripped or purposefully ripped.
    Some that i tried but dont really stick is buttonup shirt, henley, v neck tshirt, blazer, laced boots, carrying bag/ pouch, and cap/ hat.
     
  17. Well here goes. I'm 71 and wear just what I like although some may think an old man just shouldn't do that. I retired 20 years ago this coming October when I was 52 with a good retirement that allowed me time and $$ to buy my first quality leather jackets. I was never seduced with fashion but did like certain styles and custom fits. I think I have been able to upgrade in the last two decades from the simple mall goods that I wore during my working days. I do wear over dyed stretch denim jeans as well. They suit me. I wash them after probably wearing them every day for a week. I have many leather lace up and pull up boots along with western style although more comfy sneakers have been entering my wardrobe over the years. I do enjoy displaying my purchases here every so often. It's nice to get likes and favorable comments and even sometimes reasonable critique.
    HD
     
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  18. T Jones

    T Jones I'll Lock Up

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    Pictured here wearing my trusty 505 Levi's Stretch jeans, a black leather A2 Bomber jacket, and my Resistol Stagecoach conversion on top...
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Here's my Arizona ( JC Penny ) stretch over dyed denim and stretch faded jeans.

    20181229_201232.jpg 20180417_130740.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2019
  20. rocketeer

    rocketeer Call Me a Cab

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    At present I am on the lookout for an unconstructed linen suit in the UK. Is unconstructed the correct description for a minimal lined suit? I like my own term for it, I describe the slightly off white jacket as a "Man From Del-Monte suit" all topped off with a nice, really nice that is, Panama though I prefer the fedora style over the traditional rollable.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2019

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