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What Cap Are You Wearing Today?

quikrick

Practically Family
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Bay Area, California
IMG_1127 (1).jpeg
 

Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,789
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Minnesota, USA
This week the temps in my neighborhood have been "Fall" up and downs.

Cool fall day in a Covert Cloth Cordova Cap.

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A warm 80'f (27'c) day had me opening the box I had already packed up with straw caps. Perfect cap for the warm day and deliciously cool evening.

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Yesterday high temp of 52'f (11'c) I wore a Fox Brothers green covert cloth cap.

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Cheers, Eric -
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,689
Location
London, UK
And in the hotel, after arrival: the first Cathcart Cap of the trip. This is one from a transition period; the brand originally known as "Simon James Cathcart" or SJC has recently rebranded as 'Cathcart London" and "Cathcart Heritage" (I believe the intent is that the latter will be a more strictly "repro" type of thing, while the former will have some tweaks to sell to a more contemporary fashion audience.)

This particular cap is a style very traditional to Britain and Ireland (and I think much of Europe too). This is what most over here will imagine when you refer to a traditional 'flat cap' design. The fabric here is the same as used in the plaid style 33 jacket in wool in the Cathcart range. It makes for a very substantial cap, one that will be good in the dead of Winter. I'm mostly a 57 in most hats, though in some caps, like this one, a neat 58. This is snug on me, though I expect there may, as always with wool, be a degree of loosening up with wear.

Being worn:

20221016_172844.jpg


And the obligatory Eiffel Tower shot - not one of my best, it's been a long travel day, it seems!

20221016_174456.jpg


Eiffel Park was much busier today than it was last month; you can see I'm not the only person taking a selfie there today. I have another SJC cap in a lighter wool I'll be wearing tomorrow, hopefully get a better shot of that one.

This Cathcart is a really nice cap. Definitely one for a casual outfit imo, but really nice to wear. I don't know where these ones are made. Simon has changed his suppliers a couple of times. The very first SJC caps were by Simmonds, I think, but those were of necessity very small runs. This one is labelled "Made in the EU" (so outside the UK), would be interesting to pin it down further. A lot of the Cathcart tailoring is now done in England (unfortunately this rather raises the prices); not sure if the plan is to pull it all back locally across the range. Budget allowing, however, it all remains to a very high standard in my experience.
 

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Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,789
Location
Minnesota, USA
Back in Paris for two nights as of today. Travelling, a Sussex Tweed cotton / linen blend eight panel. Leaving London:

View attachment 457863 View attachment 457864

...and on the Metro, en route to the hotel on the Paris side:


View attachment 457867

The tweed, cotton and linen blend make for a comfortable looking cap. Your last pics shoes the thickness of the material. It apears hardier than any of the clothes blends standing alone. I like the paneled caps appearance.

BTW: My commute to work or other work travels are never as swanky as "traveling to Paris." Way to go Edward.

And in the hotel, after arrival: the first Cathcart Cap of the trip. This is one from a transition period; the brand originally known as "Simon James Cathcart" or SJC has recently rebranded as 'Cathcart London" and "Cathcart Heritage" (I believe the intent is that the latter will be a more strictly "repro" type of thing, while the former will have some tweaks to sell to a more contemporary fashion audience.)

This particular cap is a style very traditional to Britain and Ireland (and I think much of Europe too). This is what most over here will imagine when you refer to a traditional 'flat cap' design. The fabric here is the same as used in the plaid style 33 jacket in wool in the Cathcart range. It makes for a very substantial cap, one that will be good in the dead of Winter. I'm mostly a 57 in most hats, though in some caps, like this one, a neat 58. This is snug on me, though I expect there may, as always with wool, be a degree of loosening up with wear.

Being worn:

View attachment 457874

And the obligatory Eiffel Tower shot - not one of my best, it's been a long travel day, it seems!

View attachment 457875

Eiffel Park was much busier today than it was last month; you can see I'm not the only person taking a selfie there today. I have another SJC cap in a lighter wool I'll be wearing tomorrow, hopefully get a better shot of that one.

This Cathcart is a really nice cap. Definitely one for a casual outfit imo, but really nice to wear. I don't know where these ones are made. Simon has changed his suppliers a couple of times. The very first SJC caps were by Simmonds, I think, but those were of necessity very small runs. This one is labelled "Made in the EU" (so outside the UK), would be interesting to pin it down further. A lot of the Cathcart tailoring is now done in England (unfortunately this rather raises the prices); not sure if the plan is to pull it all back locally across the range. Budget allowing, however, it all remains to a very high standard in my experience.

I is fun to see your cap adventures.

I recall reading that Simmonds (US) made these caps. Thanks for bringing to light the Cathcart business maturation. Good to see it seeking business on the retro and trad side. I have only picked up a couple items on clearance. No caps unfortunately.

Enjoy your soirre in France Edward. Cheers, Eric -

Cheers, Eric -
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,689
Location
London, UK
The tweed, cotton and linen blend make for a comfortable looking cap. Your last pics shoes the thickness of the material. It apears hardier than any of the clothes blends standing alone. I like the paneled caps appearance.

Sussex Tweed certainly make a very fine cap. In Sussex, right in the SE corner of England - though it turns out the boss man grew up five miles down the road from where I did in County Antrim, and went to school with my cousin.


BTW: My commute to work or other work travels are never as swanky as "traveling to Paris." Way to go Edward.

It's a definite plus side of academia, and this course in particular. Almost makes up for the academic salary. Almost. ;)

I is fun to see your cap adventures.

I recall reading that Simmonds (US) made these caps. Thanks for bringing to light the Cathcart business maturation. Good to see it seeking business on the retro and trad side. I have only picked up a couple items on clearance. No caps unfortunately.

Enjoy your soirre in France Edward. Cheers, Eric -

Cheers, Eric -

Here we are - the second Cathcart cap for this trip. This time a lighter, tweed cap. Plenty warm, though a less thick cloth, lending itself better to a step up from the very casual.

1666032311958.jpeg


Again, cap constructed in the EU. The cap is "Donegal" style, though the cloth itself is woven in England (going forward, "Donegal Tweed" is to become a protected geographical mark like Champagne, though this was not the case when these were brought on the market). Lovely cloth - about the same weight and hand as the sort of wool a Pendleton 49er is made from.

Under artificial light in the hotel room this morning:

1666032657607.jpeg


1666032694448.jpeg


And a couple of shots down at the tower on a beautiful, grey and wet evening dans la Paris:

1666032924621.jpeg


1666032957819.jpeg


The Cathcart caps ain't cheap at full retail, but they are very competitively priced against the like of Simmonds, Cordova, Sussex Tweed, and such. Based on my experience of a range of these brands they are as good as any of them. Further into the Winter I may weaken and buy one of the hefty herringbone in this style. All of Simon's caps currently are this specific pattern. I'd quite like to see him bring out some others as well - the original eight point shape of the first SJC caps would be nice to see. Much as I love an eight panel, though, I think it's nice he's branched away from those as there are a lot of great options for them on the market already; these there seem fewer of. If you're thinking of trying one, though, I would highly recommend them.
 

dkstott

Practically Family
Messages
585
Location
Connecticut
Sussex Tweed certainly make a very fine cap. In Sussex, right in the SE corner of England - though it turns out the boss man grew up five miles down the road from where I did in County Antrim, and went to school with my cousin.




It's a definite plus side of academia, and this course in particular. Almost makes up for the academic salary. Almost. ;)



Here we are - the second Cathcart cap for this trip. This time a lighter, tweed cap. Plenty warm, though a less thick cloth, lending itself better to a step up from the very casual.

View attachment 458073

Again, cap constructed in the EU. The cap is "Donegal" style, though the cloth itself is woven in England (going forward, "Donegal Tweed" is to become a protected geographical mark like Champagne, though this was not the case when these were brought on the market). Lovely cloth - about the same weight and hand as the sort of wool a Pendleton 49er is made from.

Under artificial light in the hotel room this morning:

View attachment 458074

View attachment 458075

And a couple of shots down at the tower on a beautiful, grey and wet evening dans la Paris:

View attachment 458076

View attachment 458077

The Cathcart caps ain't cheap at full retail, but they are very competitively priced against the like of Simmonds, Cordova, Sussex Tweed, and such. Based on my experience of a range of these brands they are as good as any of them. Further into the Winter I may weaken and buy one of the hefty herringbone in this style. All of Simon's caps currently are this specific pattern. I'd quite like to see him bring out some others as well - the original eight point shape of the first SJC caps would be nice to see. Much as I love an eight panel, though, I think it's nice he's branched away from those as there are a lot of great options for them on the market already; these there seem fewer of. If you're thinking of trying one, though, I would highly recommend them.
Wonderful looking caps.

Here in New England, I haven't experienced any difference in warmth between Donegal or Harris tweed. My preferences lie in 8 panel newsboys. Flat caps and me aren't compatible for personal reasons.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,689
Location
London, UK
Wonderful looking caps.

Here in New England, I haven't experienced any difference in warmth between Donegal or Harris tweed. My preferences lie in 8 panel newsboys. Flat caps and me aren't compatible for personal reasons.

Cut really is a matter of personal aesthetics, all done and said. Harris and Donegal differ chiefly in look; I've encountered both in varying weights over the years. The biggest difference is that Harris Tweed is a protected mark, and only cloth woven in the correct geographical location and recognised by the Harris Tweed Authority is recognised as such by law - https://www.martelnyc.com/vintage-style/harris-tweed-history-of-a-trademark.html To the best of my understanding, Donegal Tweed doesn't have such a protection - yet - though there's a move towards that in the EU. This wouldn't prevent anyone from making a very similar cloth, but they just wouldn't be allowed to call it Donegal Tweed in the EU, in much the same was as Cava can't be marketed as Champagne.
 

dkstott

Practically Family
Messages
585
Location
Connecticut
Cut really is a matter of personal aesthetics, all done and said. Harris and Donegal differ chiefly in look; I've encountered both in varying weights over the years. The biggest difference is that Harris Tweed is a protected mark, and only cloth woven in the correct geographical location and recognised by the Harris Tweed Authority is recognised as such by law - https://www.martelnyc.com/vintage-style/harris-tweed-history-of-a-trademark.html To the best of my understanding, Donegal Tweed doesn't have such a protection - yet - though there's a move towards that in the EU. This wouldn't prevent anyone from making a very similar cloth, but they just wouldn't be allowed to call it Donegal Tweed in the EU, in much the same was as Cava can't be marketed as Champagne.
One of my made in England Gamble and Gunn caps is Moon woven too. But its Shetland wool.
20220330_083511_HDR.jpg
 

Blare

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,655
Love this tweed with maroon and tans. Can’t make out what’s left of the brand imprint on the liner.

we cruised up to Highlands,NC to see, Jackson Hole (not Wyoming) Bust Your Butt Falls… (which I could see why one might in fact bust their butt trying to cross) Dry Falls… (which are absolutely in no way dry) and Bridal Vail Falls… (which was in fact almost dry)

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Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,789
Location
Minnesota, USA
Sussex Tweed certainly make a very fine cap. In Sussex, right in the SE corner of England - though it turns out the boss man grew up five miles down the road from where I did in County Antrim, and went to school with my cousin.




It's a definite plus side of academia, and this course in particular. Almost makes up for the academic salary. Almost. ;)



Here we are - the second Cathcart cap for this trip. This time a lighter, tweed cap. Plenty warm, though a less thick cloth, lending itself better to a step up from the very casual.

View attachment 458073

Again, cap constructed in the EU. The cap is "Donegal" style, though the cloth itself is woven in England (going forward, "Donegal Tweed" is to become a protected geographical mark like Champagne, though this was not the case when these were brought on the market). Lovely cloth - about the same weight and hand as the sort of wool a Pendleton 49er is made from.

Under artificial light in the hotel room this morning:

View attachment 458074

View attachment 458075

And a couple of shots down at the tower on a beautiful, grey and wet evening dans la Paris:

View attachment 458076

View attachment 458077

The Cathcart caps ain't cheap at full retail, but they are very competitively priced against the like of Simmonds, Cordova, Sussex Tweed, and such. Based on my experience of a range of these brands they are as good as any of them. Further into the Winter I may weaken and buy one of the hefty herringbone in this style. All of Simon's caps currently are this specific pattern. I'd quite like to see him bring out some others as well - the original eight point shape of the first SJC caps would be nice to see. Much as I love an eight panel, though, I think it's nice he's branched away from those as there are a lot of great options for them on the market already; these there seem fewer of. If you're thinking of trying one, though, I would highly recommend them.

Edward; Academia benefits for sure. Sounds enjoyable.

My retirement gig, coaching, has me traveling internationally, to fun spots, only perhaps once or at most twice a year. Most of my monthly traveling is in the contiguous states to larger cities. Work finds me "at work" for most of the day and very little time is availed to visit the local communities. Such is what I like doing. ;)

On topic - for me it has taken wearing and visitng many cap styles to find some favorites. To the same, it has taken several commisions with the same custom cap makers to get the fit and features nailed down. I know that the caps are not inexpensive. After a couple it is a luxury. It is certainly my first world challenge to which cap to wear for a given occasion. I do enjoy my caps.

I understand the market mostly centering on a specific cap as the "standard." I too own a standard. I really enjoy wearing a cap that has "special features." I can take the cap off and enjoy the back belt, pleats, sweat details, liner, materials, sewing pattern, pattern matching, just the fabric - the fabric, the overall look, the brim and of course the ability to wear the cap paired with my attire. I enjoy selecting a cap immensely.

As to style, wow, that is a quagmire subject as it is personal and situational (for me).

Edward, your pic backdrops are just a treat this evening after coming home after a long 12 hour day. I imagine the time I was in the general neighborhood of your pics and the total enjoyment I had. I will hav to travel to Paris in the upcoming time and revisit the spots of my fantastic memories.

You look dapper sir. Cheers. Best, Eric -


Wonderful looking caps.

Here in New England, I haven't experienced any difference in warmth between Donegal or Harris tweed. My preferences lie in 8 panel newsboys. Flat caps and me aren't compatible for personal reasons.

If by flat caps you mean those caps that fit close to the head with the side seam across the side of the cap with a small brim - I do not enjoy them. Having something close fitting against my bald pate is just not pleasurable for me. Panel or many pointed caps are my daily go to's. Other styles and bright fabrics are colors to my cap wearing. Not the "meat and potatoes."

I admit that I do not have any personal conversations (face to face with other cap wearers). I make my decisions by myself. While I ask my wife. She does not usually provide much constructive feedback to style. Fabric and color - yes. I have collected some catalog pics and vintage pics of caps being worn and use them for references. No real people or conversations with other cap wearers. Certainly I really delve into posts here and the Cap Facebook Group. It is not the same.

I do have the luxary of establishing a relationship with a couple of the cap makers. This has "paid off in spades." They have steered me to different options, fits and styles that have proven to better suit my uses. Dreams and wishes in some cases do not provide a cap that can be worn more than occasionally. As crazy as the pricing may seem establishing a relationship with a maker and ordering a few caps, I believe, does pay off in the long run. I will wear caps/hats till my last day and I wish to enjoy these clothing items.

Aywhoooo, grand caps you have shared of late! I really do read and enjoy your cap wearing adventure pics.

Love this tweed with maroon and tans. Can’t make out what’s left of the brand imprint on the liner.

we cruised up to Highlands,NC to see, Jackson Hole (not Wyoming) Bust Your Butt Falls… (which I could see why one might in fact bust their butt trying to cross) Dry Falls… (which are absolutely in no way dry) and Bridal Vail Falls… (which was in fact almost dry)

View attachment 458136 View attachment 458137 View attachment 458138 View attachment 458139 View attachment 458140 View attachment 458141 View attachment 458142 View attachment 458143 View attachment 458144 View attachment 458145

Enjoy your vacation adventure Blare. Seeing your posts is enjoyable. Today's cap just pairs with your attire and the backdrop. Selecting caps for the environment is sweet! I love the hues and pattern in that wool.
 
Last edited:

Blare

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,655
Enjoy your vacation adventure Blare. Seeing your posts is enjoyable. Today's cap just pairs with your attire and the backdrop. Selecting caps for the environment is sweet! I love the hues and pattern in that wool.
Thank you again Eric. I am quite happy with my choice to grab a handful of caps to throw in my bag prior to leaving home. They have come in quite handy considering different environments and weather conditions We have encountered.
 

Edward

Bartender
Messages
23,689
Location
London, UK
Final day in Paris. Had a session this morning coaching a debate team which was fun; I'm doing a little admin in the office now before lunch with a colleague and then heading off to my Eurostar early evening. Today's cap is a blue wool, eight panel number from Sussex Tweed, their Brighton model. Under artificial light in the hotel room (Paris, being that bit further south, is darker earlier in the evening and later in the morning than London right now:

1666086541087.jpeg


1666086576801.jpeg


...and in natural light, on my way to the office building:
1666086922374.jpeg


This has been a fun indulgence - I'd normally probably only bring one or two hats on a trip like this, but it's been fun trying different ones out and about this last couple of days. Home tonight; this is my last planned work trip here for the year as things sit; next work travel will, fingers-crossed, be my first trip to Beijing since 2019 in April / May; very different hat requirements there at that time of year!
 

Short Balding Guy

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,789
Location
Minnesota, USA
I wore my only cap on this slightly chilly fall morning, it is Mucros that I purchased on a trip to Ireland 5 years or so ago. This cap is so easy to wear and I love the style.
View attachment 459246
View attachment 459247 View attachment 459248

Your cap with travel memories is darn sharp! Love the tweed.


Cool Brent. Bold wool hues and an eye catching interior. Thanks for sharing.

Cheers, Eric -
 

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