Calling all fans of the Great Depression

Discussion in 'The Observation Bar' started by vintage68, Oct 1, 2008.

  1. BegintheBeguine

    BegintheBeguine My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Hallelujah, I'm a Bum!

    There are some late 60s-early 70s movies I recall: Paper Moon, Bonnie and Clyde, They Shoot Horses Don't They? (which I also read the book, wow, I recommend it), Thieves Like Us, The Great Waldo Pepper.
    People like the Depression era in movies because it means adventure, going out on your own, having nothing to lose, stuff like that, like in It Happened One Night.
    Just yesterday I was thinking about a Depression-era book my brother and I read when we were youngsters called Sanctuary, by William Faulkner. I remember my brother saying sarcastically it made him want to go out and whistle a tune! Depressing as Hell, not for children.
     
  2. Mike in Seattle

    Mike in Seattle My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  3. Foofoogal

    Foofoogal Banned

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    One even more vintage resolution of debt and enslavement through debts were the Sabbatical year (releasing debts each 7 years) and the Year of Jubilee (reclaiming of ground owned by the families originally owning it each 50 years).

    ----------------
    Interesting. Is this still practiced anywhere? I have alot of land coming back to me.
     
  4. Hondo

    Hondo One Too Many

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    Friend, Were sorta treading into politics, think socialism with government take over of any banks, it happens to Communists Socialist and that nut Hugo Chavez Venezuelan, were not going that route, you can be sure.
    ride it out, pay off your debts (credit cards) :)
     
  5. vintage68

    vintage68 Practically Family

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    Yeah, I obviously don't want to make this a political thread. For one, there's too much out there that we don't need to bring it in here, and for another I'm more interested in the culture of the time period and not so much the politics.

    Did anyone ever read Ironweed, by William Kennedy, or see the movie based on the book? It won the Pulitzer when it came out. There was a movie made of it starring Jack Nicholson, Meryl Streep, and Tom Waits of all people.
     
  6. Dagwood

    Dagwood Practically Family

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    Here is a nice promotional video of the National Recovery Administration featuring Jimmy Durante.
     
  7. BegintheBeguine

    BegintheBeguine My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Yes, Ironweed! That was a good one. I read the book and saw the movie; a good friend was living in Albany at the time and appeared in the film as one of the ball players.
    You might want to check out the movie Murder in the First. It starts out set in the 30s and it's gritty.
     
  8. The key word is confidence. When the confidence of those who invest is at a low, they pull their money to the safer areas and it is not available for business to move forward. The depth and length of time for the lack of confidence is what makes the difference between recession and depression.

    As I understand it the Stock Market did not return to the 1929 levels until well after WWII. The thing is we have so much investment power as a nation, think of the sums of money people are putting into 401K's and the like, that money has to be invested. When the market drops then forward looking investers know that it is an oppourtunity to Buy Low. It is also a time to look at where the over-exuberance has been and avoid some of those areas. Anybody remember the dot-com bust?
     
  9. vintage68

    vintage68 Practically Family

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    Thanks, I'll look for Murder in the First.

    How good of a job did they do bringing the book Ironweed to the screen? Did you like one more than the other? I hear that there were several Oscar nominations, one each for Nicholson and Streep.
     
  10. BegintheBeguine

    BegintheBeguine My Mail is Forwarded Here

    They did a good job but I liked the book better but I can't remember why. It has been 20 years so maybe it's time for a re-view and re-read!
     
  11. Forgotten Man

    Forgotten Man One Too Many

    Paper Moon is such a great movie... I love the fact that it's shot in black and white... I adore that film!

    Penny's From Heaven is also good... that's a fun depression era flick... and the costuming isn't half bad either.

    The Great Depression has and will always have a fallowing... because, just as it was mentioned earlier, there's a sense of adventure and making it on your own and taking risks because there's nothing to lose!

    I'm not sure where our country is headed but, I know that we'll all do whatever we can to make a go at it. Life is full of surprises, good and bad.

    =R
     
  12. jake_fink

    jake_fink Call Me a Cab

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    Ironweed is great. All of Kennedy's books are worth a look as most of them take place in around the same period - as in the same few days - depicted in Ironweed, or they feature the same characters, their ancestors or descendants. The movie was so-so, and is not available on dvd as far as I know.

    Check out Billy Phelan's Greatest Game, which features just about the most exciting bowling showdown in literary history. It is also set in 1937.

    And I'll stick my oar in... Paper Moon really is as good as everyone says.
     
  13. Miss 1929

    Miss 1929 My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Which one?

    The silly Steve Martin Pennies from Heave, or the excellent BBC musical series? That one is chock-full of great songs.

    Speaking of songs - a few favorites from the Depression, lyrics about love and money (or lack thereof):

    P from H of course...
    Remember My Forgotten Man
    Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?
    We're In the Money
    Let's Have Another Cup of Coffee
    Side By Side
    I Can't Give You Anything But Love
    A Million Dollar Baby in a Five and Ten Cent Store
    If I Had A Million Dollars
    A Cup of Coffee, a Sandwich , And You
     
  14. Hondo

    Hondo One Too Many

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    Having parents who grew up during the great depression, not allot of fond memories, lots of lost dreams, love within family gone, my dad felt deep loss, and the nearest step-dad he had was his ships captain who look after younger saliors under his wings.

    I often think, worry about the future of our younger generation. This country has confidence, power to stay positive, AND needs ALL Americans to re-invest in America, New emigrants should also take note, its fine to send a few dollars aboard to family in need but remember why you came here, be a part of this society, contribute, invest here, so your future and others is guaranteed safe and sound. Just my two cents worth.

     
  15. dhermann1

    dhermann1 I'll Lock Up

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    A real depression is really no fun at all. At the height of the 30's, people were scavenging garbage dumps for food. Memory makes the bad stuff fade, and the good stuff remain. A depression is not a nice prospect.
    To semi change the subject, I just read this extremely interesting article about the depression of the 1870's. Yes, there have been several in our history, the Panic of 1837, the Panic of 1873 and the Panic of 1893. All three of those decades were periods of outright economic depression in the country. Anyway, here's a very stimulating article about the depression of the 1870's:
    http://chronicle.com/temp/reprint.php?id=477k3d8mh2wmtpc4b6h07p4hy9z83x18
     
  16. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    Well, the stock market crash of 1929 was not really the proximate cause of the Depression. On Main Street, as we say today, things went along pretty well throughout all of 1930. Consumer durable goods (furniture, radio sets, appliances, electric refrigerators and automobiles) sold nearly as well in 1930 as they did in 1929, which was a record year for most of these catagories. Unemployment was beginning to be a problem, but not a serious one.

    The real depression did not begin until the worldwide credit system seized up in the late spring of 1931, with the collapse of the Creditanstalt in Vienna.

    By the end of the summer of 1931, the unemployment rate had soared, and the Depression was making itself felt throughout the nation.

    Note that the economic fundimentals in 1987 were more akin to those present during the Banker's Panic of 1907. Today, the world economy is facing weakness on so very many levels.

    Note, too, that if our unemployment rate was calculated using the same metrics as were used in the 1930's, our unemployment rate would be just above 14%, about where we were in the summer of 1931. If economic growth were still calculated the way that it was before 1974, we have been in recession every quarter since 2001, save for the 1st quarter of 2004.

    Of course, our social safety net, though strained, is working pretty well to ameliorate the extremes of distress that prevailed in the 1930's, and we will doubtless never see the widespread destitution of that period.
     
  17. dhermann1

    dhermann1 I'll Lock Up

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    One good example of our safety net working better today is the new tent cities cropping up in the hard hit areas. In the 30's the people in the tent cities were treated as pariahs and persecuted viciously. Now we have tent cities designed to provide at least minimal comfort, safety and sanitation.
     
  18. RBH

    RBH Bartender

  19. Paisley

    Paisley I'll Lock Up

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    No footnotes?
     
  20. vitanola

    vitanola I'll Lock Up

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    Do you REALLY want 'em?;)
     

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