Questions about knit ties

Discussion in 'General Attire & Accoutrements' started by Torpedo, Aug 16, 2010.

  1. Torpedo

    Torpedo One Too Many

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    Hello,

    I am under the impression that knit ties are considered either casual (for sports attire, like sports jackets with odd trousers, or other types of casual jackets; or for summer or country suits and the like.

    Would that be right? They do not seem very popular in the Golden Age; do they belong to an earlier (or latter) era better?

    Regards!
     
  2. They were popular in the 1930s golden era, but not for business wear. Think sportscoats, country suits, etc.

    Nonetheless, finely crocheted ties were pretty regularly worn with business suits from the 'teens to the mid '20s.
     
  3. avedwards

    avedwards Call Me a Cab

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    They were worn with business suits in the 60s. Sean Connery's Bond always wears one. Perhaps they were popular then because they're skinny and match the narrow lapels of that decade?
     
  4. Miss Tuppence

    Miss Tuppence A-List Customer

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    I have knitting patterns from the 40's to the 60's /70's (cringe worthy for the latter -not my decade at all) both for cut off (Not sure what they are called) and the regular shape. I would of thought they would of been worn for sports and casual wear only in the 30's-50's and in the patterns from later on when style was in decline they referred to the 'business man'!:eusa_doh:
     
  5. Feraud

    Feraud Bartender

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    James Bond wasn't your typical businessman. ;)
     
  6. Guttersnipe

    Guttersnipe One Too Many

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    I see them in a lot of old movies, circa 1940-1950, generally with suits made of nubby tweeds or flecky flannel. Usually the combo is worn by rough, seedy individuals (think Robert Mitchum's character in Out of The Past). I think it was costume designers way of communicating that a character, while properly dressed, lacked a certain something that made them fit in with the rest of society. Needless to say I love the look lol

    Here's Fred MacMurray rocking the look (and being a giant sleaze) in Double Indemnity:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. cptjeff

    cptjeff Practically Family

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    Part of that was that it was one of the aspects of Bond's dress that was specified in the books. Blue suit, white shirt, black knit tie. The movies got away from that, but the literary Bond basically wore that as a uniform.

    Oh, also, the literary Bond hated shoes with laces and wore Norwegian loafers. AKA weejuns. Random trivia there.
     
  8. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    Probably more like something here . ;)
     
  9. cptjeff

    cptjeff Practically Family

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    At the rate he destroyed shoes?
     
  10. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    Hey, don't ask me, ask Fleming.......he's the one that put Bond in Lobb. [huh]

    But seriously, Savile Row suits, Turnbull & Asser shirts with weejuns? :rolleyes:
     
  11. Vintage lover

    Vintage lover A-List Customer

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    I believe he also disliked tea, (Flemming saw it as the downfall of the British Empire) the Windsor knot, and believed that the "infallible badge of a bad driver", was "a hat clamped firmly on the exact centre of [his] head".
    For reference, I believe Indy Magnoli offers a replica of the black tie Sean Connery wore as Bond in two colors. And when it comes to business, one could say that certain aspects of his job qualified his business as pleasure...
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Doc Average

    Doc Average One of the Regulars

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    "Bond had looked at her severely. "I don't drink tea. I hate it. It's mud. Moreover it's one of the main reasons for the downfall of the British Empire. Be a good girl and make me some coffee." - Goldfinger.

    I have the above quote on a coffee mug, which, ironically I only ever drink tea from. I'm the opposite of Bond. I love tea, can't stand coffee.

    Supposedly, Bond's dislike of the Windsor knot may be a result of its association with the Duke of Windsor (who of course supposedly never wore it) due to his alleged political sympathies in the 1930s, and the fact it was favoured by the Cambridge Spy ring. Personally, I'm not sure if either of those explanations is true, and think it was probably just another of Fleming's many personal prejudices. Whatever - he deemed it to be "the mark of a cad". And since it "takes one to know one", I'll assume he knew what he was talking about. ;)

    (Me - I like it!)
     
  13. Torpedo

    Torpedo One Too Many

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    Thank you all for the comments. :)

    I would place the woven woolen / hand loomed ties more or less in the same category; at least those more rougher or coarser, and those with a fringed tip (like those made by the native Americans, for instance). Would you agree?
     
  14. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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  15. Edward

    Edward Bartender

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    Can't say I've ever given it much thought, to be honest, but I have instinctively worn mine pretty much exclusively with tweeds or in more casual environments.
     
  16. Tomasso

    Tomasso Incurably Addicted

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    Yep, wearing them with woolens is tried and true while wearing them with worsteds can be very tricky.
     
  17. Mav

    Mav A-List Customer

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    Yeah, agreed. Knitted ties were pretty big for awhile in the early 80's and guys tended to wear them with things they shouldn't. They work well with a tweed- and- cord combo, in the same application as a very muted tartan tie. I'd actually like to find a couple again for Fall/ Winter.
     

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