Show us their suits

Discussion in 'Suits' started by Matt Deckard, Jul 19, 2006.

  1. Patrick Hall

    Patrick Hall Practically Family

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    Mightn't Mr. Coward be in Morning Dress - a stroller and grey formal trousers?
     
  2. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    this needs to be discussed at a later date:


    [​IMG]
     
  3. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    very well spotted TT. definitely the same jacket. the shoulders fit Leslie better than they do Dirk.
     
  4. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Whenever I have stumbled across vintage jackets that are three button, but have the lapels pressed to button on just two of them, I have always imagined it to be something done by accident. I had not realised it had been an intentional look. These two jackets worn by William Holden in 'Sabrina' (1954) proved me to be wrong:

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    In both cases the obvious buttonhole in the lower lapel indicates this was clearly an intentional look.
     
  5. Mario

    Mario I'll Lock Up

    It's called a 3-roll-2. The top (rolled-in) buttonhole is usually only properly finished on the side that's visible (the backside) and is not meant to be buttoned. The first time I came across this design was on my late-50's herringbone tweed suit.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2012
  6. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    I've watched a couple of 1940s films this weekend: 'Green for Danger' and 'Major Barbara'. In both films I have noticed something unusual: elements of style that appear more in keeping with the 1970s rather than the 1940s.

    First, look at Rex Harrison's tie in 'Major Barbara'. The tie is much more rigidly constructed than most ties of the period. And the knot is much larger than is commonly seen. Add to that the loose, long collars and it just reminds me of the 1970s.
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    And here is Alastair Sim in 'Green for Danger'. Once again, the loose collar with large and loose knot on the tie. This was the sort of knot we tried to get away with at school in the seventies. And look at the shape of his tie - nothing like most British ties in films of this period. It even has the shine of a Polyester tie and the very large Paisley print that was popular in the early seventies. Even his hat, with the rear of the brim turned down, has that 70s feel.

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    But it gets worse: Robert Morley (in 'Major Barbara') is wearing a pair of glasses that come right out the seventies or early eighties!
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    However, Robert Morley redeems himself with this overcoat:
    There's nothing special about the front:

    [​IMG]

    But the back is marvellous:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    This is also from 'Major Barbara'. The 'screen grab' hasn't come out too clear, but this waistcoat is also flat across the front, with two very small points.
    [​IMG]
    Was this a common feature of the period (the film was made in 1941)?

    Here is a good view of his suit: there is something very continental (and a bit flash) about his whole look:
    [​IMG]

    By contrast, Rex Harrison's suit is the very model of conservatism - and looks fantastic. I think the plain bow tie is ideal with a suit of that pattern:
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Two Types

    Two Types I'll Lock Up

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    Having criticised the rather large and loose tie knots worn by Sim and Harrison, here is Trevor Howard (in 'Green for Danger') displaying the complete opposite, a tiny knot worn with such precision - and at such an angle - that (in profile) one can see clearly through the gap between shirt and tie. I love how the shadow is very obvious:

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    I wasn't able to grab a really clear shot, but he appears to be wearing a stiff, seperate collar, with the knot held very high.
     
  10. TCMfan25

    TCMfan25 Practically Family

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    Jwalls? Is that you?
     
  11. Feraud

    Feraud Bartender

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    I think you mean the elements of style from the 1970s were more in keeping with the 40s. One cannot "wear it forward", so to speak. ;)
     
  12. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Another one for herringbonekid

    August Sander: High School Student. Cologne, 1926.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

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    wow, that is a crazy fabric ! 1920s suits... where have you all gone ?


    p.s. i keep meaning to buy that book on August Sander. thanks for reminding me.
     

  14. And here's a similar wool tweed in an early 1970s sportcoat:


    [​IMG]
     
  15. Vampyre Master

    Vampyre Master Vendor

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    I want !!!!!!!!
    V
     
  16. Flat Foot Floey

    Flat Foot Floey My Mail is Forwarded Here

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    Is it a suit or an overcoat?
     
  17. Mario

    Mario I'll Lock Up

    Looks like an overcoat to me.
     
  18. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    i like the shoulders on this suit. trim but with a pronounced rope:


    [​IMG]


    how to dress a DB down; wear a flat cap with it:


    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mario

    Mario I'll Lock Up

    Mr. Cooper really knew how to do it.
     
  20. herringbonekid

    herringbonekid I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    this sort of 1920s shoulder has no padding. not a little bit of padding... no padding at all. your shoulder fills out the area of sleeve where pads and sleeve-head wadding would ordinarily be doing the work. most 30s freaks don't like it as they prefer the more sculpted silhouette. me, i think there's something about a closer fitting garment that makes a guy look like he's wearing it, rather than the other way around. i blame the 9 DVD box set of Harold Lloyd films for turning me on to the 20s.

    [​IMG]

    the breast pocket also looks interesting.

    photo courtesy of FFF.
     

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