Explaining the Aero Fit.

Discussion in 'Outerwear' started by cloudylemonade, Jan 12, 2021.

  1. cloudylemonade

    cloudylemonade A-List Customer

    Messages:
    387
    Location:
    Glasgow
    We've noticed some confusion about how Aero's fit, and people questioning why they wouldn't always be the same size in each style, why a size 42" for example will vary so much depending on the style.

    We've put together a little guide to help with this, hopefully this will be of help to some folks here!

    “Fit” falls into two categories; Fashion or traditional tailored.

    Traditional bespoke tailoring, as seen in Savile Row style, has altered very little in the past 100 years. A suit made for a gentleman with (for example) a 42” chest will have an external pit to pit measurement of 23” giving approx. 4” of internal movement room minus the thickness of the lining, wadding etc (See the red line on rough graph below). While in fashion the perceived correct fit of utility clothing has varied considerably over the past century, probably more so in leather garments than in any other clothing. The size on the ticket has always represents how a jacket was “supposed to fit” during the particular era it was designed and/or constructed.

    Aero’s designs have always been true to the era, consequently a 1930s replica or design marked 42” will have a smaller pit to pit than a 1950s replica/design also sized 42”. The size on the ticket would remain the same and would represent the way that specific design would have been cut and sized during the era it was originally made for.

    Briefly, again taking a size 42” as a reference.

    During the 1920s and into the latter half of the 1930s movement room was very skimpy, 22 ½” to 23” being typical. As the era came to a close jackets began to be cut slightly more generously, 23” being typical pit to pit for a 42”. Following the end of WW2 fit became looser, pit to pit for a 42” was often in the region of 24” maybe more, check the fit of the Biker Jackets in The Wild One. While a man knew what size he was, a 42”, he also wanted to look “right”, this did not mean buying a bigger jacket, it meant buying a bigger cut jacket.

    This trend for a bigger looser cut continued right through the 1950s where it would not be unusual for a 42” to have a pit to pit 25” or even more. Into the 1960s and year by year this trend was reversed, by the late 1960s it would be typical for a 42” to have a pit to pit of 22” or even less!

    Through the 1970s this ‘spray on’ fit gradually returned to a fit more typical of the 1940s, this continued into the early 1980s when movement room was gradually increased to almost comic dimensions a look that peaked in the early 1990s, since when the period fit has continued to drop until, today, the correct fit is perceived by many to be much as it was in the late 1930, with a 4” movement room, or 23” pit to pit on a 42”.

    Aero jackets fit the way they were cut in period we are replication, a 1950s Highwayman is how such a jacket would have been made to fit had it been made in the 1950s, while our 1930s Highwayman isn’t a ‘retagged’ 1950s jacket, it’s a complete recut to the style and manner of the 1930s.

    So to sum up again, an Aero will always fit as it would have been made and worn during the era the design dates from.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mrfrown

    Mrfrown A-List Customer

    Messages:
    487
    It’s an interesting method. One that makes good internal sense.

    It does however ask quite a bit of the modern day consumer to know all the different size expectations over time.
     
    dannyk, Logician, Brandrea33 and 2 others like this.
  3. Mich486

    Mich486 One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,289
    Interesting chart especially how this over/under sizing seems to fluctuate over time. If the past is anything to go by we are moving towards more relaxed sizes in the next decade.

    I think it’d be even more helpful for people considering Aeros to list the stock size measurements for each model on the website though.
     
    torfjord likes this.
  4. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    7,464
    Location:
    Australia
    So that explains it. Thank you, I always wondered about this one. Makes sense, but as Mr F says it does presuppose customer knowledge. Period fit for many people just means trim fit. I guess if you are choosing jackets by your preferred numbers it won't be an issue.
     
  5. AeroFan_07

    AeroFan_07 My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,389
    Location:
    Iowa
    Thanks for the helpful information - and historical comparison as well.
    This is indeed helpful as styles and cuts are considered.
     
  6. handymike

    handymike I'll Lock Up

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    Location:
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    While I understand the premise, I feel it would also be helpful to “interpret” all these sizing variants for us on Aero’s website.
    In my experience with vintage jackets there is indeed variation in cuts by decade and maker, but typically a 38 has a consistent 17.5” shoulder width. Chest sizes also seem to be around 20.5- 21.5” even though some jackets are “boxier” or have wider sleeves.
    I think that having recommendations posted and some sort of fit chart would help a lot in determining the desired fit without trying multiple jackets.
     
  7. Monitor

    Monitor

    Messages:
    12,407
    Yeah, this.

    I think that ultimately, vast majority of people buying a pricey leather jacket simply want to look good. People see all these perfect photos online and want the jacket to fit them that way.
    Aero is one of the first recommendations that comes up with even basic research and I always believed that this is where sticking to the historical cuts - as commendable as that may be - might turn out to be a problem. Hence all these threads on some or the other Aero is too large/roomy/boxy/whatever.

    This could all be remedied by more detailed info on the fit, perhaps some suggestions on what to go with if one doesn't particularly care for cosplay, as I'm sure many don't.
     
  8. Marc mndt

    Marc mndt One Too Many

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    1,729
    There is info available on the different patterns. Here's three different halfbelts. B5929BE0-CD84-4006-BA3C-C8EECE3FDCD1.jpeg B4B71EEE-64C2-4D57-BFEC-A80B5BCAEFCB.jpeg 7440FEB2-0E1D-4601-AC0D-3CAA9DFE77DD.jpeg

    The 30s slimfit halfbelt has a classic 30s cut.

    The 50s halfbelt has a comfortable fit.

    The premier 30s halfbelt has a slim fitting early 30s fit.

    How to measure yourself.
    A1C478C2-9891-4CC0-ABA4-0C14212F88AC.jpeg

    I have a 43' chest and a rather slim waist. Let's say I like a neat fit. According to the above info, which model in what size should I choose?

    Premier halfbelt in a 42, or a 44? Or a 50s halfbelt one size down, would that be 42 or 40? Honesty, I have no clue.
     
  9. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    Fair point, Marc - I guess this is why most people who are 'fit informed' just go by measurements and essentially ignore marked sizes.
     
    El Marro and Marc mndt like this.
  10. willyto

    willyto One Too Many

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    That’s not always easy to do. I go by measurements but size tag always plays tricks in my mind anyway.
     
    bn1966, Marc mndt and Seb Lucas like this.
  11. Psant25

    Psant25 One Too Many

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    1,132
    I have a 40 inch chest and a 42 premier highwayman was too trim. 44 would fit better. I would have a hard time zipping a 40
     
    Seb Lucas likes this.
  12. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    7,464
    Location:
    Australia
    I can see how it would. I am too used to wearing sizes from: 38 to 46 or 'smalls' to 'extra large' all depending on the pattern and maker. All of them have the same pit to pit.
     
  13. Seb Lucas

    Seb Lucas I'll Lock Up

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    7,464
    Location:
    Australia
    Ditto.
     
  14. dudewuttheheck

    dudewuttheheck Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,484
    Very informative and interesting. Still, I think Aero could give more information than they do. I see that they have some level of guide, but IMO it could be better. That said, I would expect most of us would talk to them first or just order through Thurston Bros. anyway.
     
  15. jglf

    jglf One of the Regulars

    Messages:
    123
    Location:
    USA
    I’ll only ever buy jackets based on its measurements. It would be nice if jacket makers included shoulder opening and bicep widths too. Low arm holes and baggy sleeves, in my opinion, can make a jacket look sloppy.
     
  16. Marc mndt

    Marc mndt One Too Many

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    I think too many measurements might scare off less informed buyers.
     
  17. dudewuttheheck

    dudewuttheheck Call Me a Cab

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    I would love to know how many people they get that are so uninformed that they don't care to have actual measurements. That data would be really interesting.
     
  18. Marc mndt

    Marc mndt One Too Many

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    1,729
    I'm not saying ptp, shoulder width and bottom hem width would be too much. I think additional measurements like bicep width or what have you would be too much.

    That's actually one of the reasons I'm not ordering anything full custom from 5*. I don't feel like worrying about every single measurement one can think of. I'd rather buy a jacket with a well though out pattern.
     
  19. MrProper

    MrProper Practically Family

    Messages:
    848
    I think this is true for the absolute majority. And if you are built halfway normally, then a few dimensions are sufficient, provided the designer has thought about the appropriate proportions.
    I feel in good hands with Aero/Holly. I say how I would like it and Holly & team consider which size is the right base. and then I don't care whether it's 40, 42 or 44.
     
    Peter Mackin, El Marro and jonbuilder like this.
  20. dudewuttheheck

    dudewuttheheck Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,484
    Oh, yeah I would be good with that too for the most part. I just don't like to trust a company's thoughts on what my size should be. Any time I go by tag size without measurements or give my body measurements to a maker, it doesn't work out for me.
     
    red devil, Carlos840 and Marc mndt like this.

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