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I did find this…
I cannot hear the audio very well at all. It looks like he is hooking both ends...or has double stick tape or something. Especially noticeable when he takes it off, the under part sticks to the hat.

In any event if it does have hooks he did not catch himself like I ALWAYS seem to on one end or the other.:rolleyes:

This all did remind me of a cool find I had several years ago.....I bought a Boater with three pugs AND the original standard black ribbon and bow all sewn together with pug hooks added to each end. And I do wear it and switch out the ribbon/bow and pugs dependent on what I am wearing.;)
 

The Shoe

One Too Many
Messages
1,958
Location
Wakayama, Japan
I cannot hear the audio very well at all. It looks like he is hooking both ends...or has double stick tape or something. Especially noticeable when he takes it off, the under part sticks to the hat.

In any event if it does have hooks he did not catch himself like I ALWAYS seem to on one end or the other.:rolleyes:

This all did remind me of a cool find I had several years ago.....I bought a Boater with three pugs AND the original standard black ribbon and bow all sewn together with pug hooks added to each end. And I do wear it and switch out the ribbon/bow and pugs dependent on what I am wearing.;)
To be honest, the audio is a little annoying, but as far as I can tell he seems to just hold one end in place and push the single hook through the other end of the ribbon.
 
Messages
19,309
Location
Funkytown, USA
What a one hook pug may look like.

download_1_2.png
 

CRH

Call Me a Cab
Messages
2,269
Location
West Branch, IA
I’ve been looking at puggarees on a website that Brent (where have you been Brent @deadlyhandsome?) shared a while back. Some of them have two hooks (like ones I’ve used so far, but some of them say one hook.
My question is how do you attach a one hook pug. Do you put the hook through the pug to hold it in place?
What's the website?
 

Steve1857

I'll Lock Up
Messages
8,701
Location
Denmark
I've done a little searching and not much luck. Any of you in Europe/GB have any insights on Macqueen of London?
View attachment 621366 View attachment 621367
Interesting find, Randy.

I believe the name stems from a man called James Macqeen. He was the London agent for hatters J & W Walker of Denton, Manchester.

In the mid 1800s he partnered up with William Battersby and thereby opened up a larger market for Battersby of Stockport, Manchester.

Your hat is of course later than the 1800s and I don’t really know much about Macqeen's company after that. They weren't manufacturers themselves, so the hat you have would have been made by someone else.

Can you post more photos of the liner logo, lettering on the sweatband, any labels under the sweat, and the hat itself.
 

cubby01

New in Town
Messages
1
Location
KS
Can anyone tell me what brand hat based on this sweatband stamp... Thanks.
 

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RickP

A-List Customer
Messages
391
After reading about stetson and resistol powdered dyes running off and on for years, I finally had a bit of an experience recently. A used hat was filthy and had a couple large oily stains, so it got partially disassembeled, and a gas bath to clean. (probably should have FULLY dissassembeled because the new looking but cheap sweatband basically melted during the gas dunk lol) I got rid of the bad oil stains, but the hat was pretty "blotchy" afterwards. Its a little better after a week or so of drying out, but Im wondering for future reference, if anyone has had experience in "setting" the color on a powered dyed used hat. Ive run into a couple hats that "spot" cleaning resulted in a serious change in color and required a full gas dunking to even things out, (but a couple times resulted in the aforementioned somewhat "blotchy" finish). Im wondering about maybe a woolite delicate bath to get rid of oils first and then maybe "setting" the coloring. i have to say Ive never experienced color running after rain,,, only after a serious cleaning process like white gas.

Over the years I had good luck setting liquid dyes with white vinegar in fabrics and leathers, but working with newer used hats that evidently sometimes have powdered dyes to even the coloring out is kind of an unknown area. Probably wouldnt be much of an issue if I played with nice older vintage hats, but on my budget I enjoy playing with 70's-90's cheap used hats to rehab.

What say ye?
Compress_20240618_124943_3128.jpg
 
Messages
10,596
Location
vancouver, canada
After reading about stetson and resistol powdered dyes running off and on for years, I finally had a bit of an experience recently. A used hat was filthy and had a couple large oily stains, so it got partially disassembeled, and a gas bath to clean. (probably should have FULLY dissassembeled because the new looking but cheap sweatband basically melted during the gas dunk lol) I got rid of the bad oil stains, but the hat was pretty "blotchy" afterwards. Its a little better after a week or so of drying out, but Im wondering for future reference, if anyone has had experience in "setting" the color on a powered dyed used hat. Ive run into a couple hats that "spot" cleaning resulted in a serious change in color and required a full gas dunking to even things out, (but a couple times resulted in the aforementioned somewhat "blotchy" finish). Im wondering about maybe a woolite delicate bath to get rid of oils first and then maybe "setting" the coloring. i have to say Ive never experienced color running after rain,,, only after a serious cleaning process like white gas.

Over the years I had good luck setting liquid dyes with white vinegar in fabrics and leathers, but working with newer used hats that evidently sometimes have powdered dyes to even the coloring out is kind of an unknown area. Probably wouldnt be much of an issue if I played with nice older vintage hats, but on my budget I enjoy playing with 70's-90's cheap used hats to rehab.

What say ye? View attachment 622945
I spent a few years learning hatting by working on beater westerns that I picked up cheap on the Bay. I would first wash them using Orvis Paste, a low PH soap/cleanser. Then if that didn't work well I would up the ante to the naptha bath. It was a real crap shoot. Black hats were the worst as the Orvis wash water would be totally blackened from the leached dye....but it usually came out clean and still evenly dyed. Lighter coloured felts were a different animal. Many of them came out totally blotchy and unusable. Those I chose to experiment with redyes.
 

RickP

A-List Customer
Messages
391
I spent a few years learning hatting by working on beater westerns that I picked up cheap on the Bay. I would first wash them using Orvis Paste, a low PH soap/cleanser. Then if that didn't work well I would up the ante to the naptha bath. It was a real crap shoot. Black hats were the worst as the Orvis wash water would be totally blackened from the leached dye....but it usually came out clean and still evenly dyed. Lighter coloured felts were a different animal. Many of them came out totally blotchy and unusable. Those I chose to experiment with redyes.
Thanks! I ve learned over time that you almost have to know exactly what dye was used on a fabric because of the risk of stripping out most of the dye ( Ive turned faded black silk shirt to a powder blue with bright white threads lol). Im of the opinion that some standard liquid dyes will totally wash out unless they are set with something like vinegar or boiling during the dye process. (That is in my opinion why old silk shirts can look so cruddy)
 
Messages
10,596
Location
vancouver, canada
Thanks! I ve learned over time that you almost have to know exactly what dye was used on a fabric because of the risk of stripping out most of the dye ( Ive turned faded black silk shirt to a powder blue with bright white threads lol). Im of the opinion that some standard liquid dyes will totally wash out unless they are set with something like vinegar or boiling during the dye process. (That is in my opinion why old silk shirts can look so cruddy)
I use a good quality Acid dye such as Ciba or Jacquard. An important step in the dye process is 'setting' the dye into the fabric. I would feel terrible if I sold one of my dyed hats and had the customer end up with a blue, black or brown face! I have begun to experiment using natural dyes to achieve interesting colours. I need to make a larger dye vat but it has to be stainless steel so the dye does not react to the metal.
 

RickP

A-List Customer
Messages
391
I use a good quality Acid dye such as Ciba or Jacquard. An important step in the dye process is 'setting' the dye into the fabric. I would feel terrible if I sold one of my dyed hats and had the customer end up with a blue, black or brown face! I have begun to experiment using natural dyes to achieve interesting colours. I need to make a larger dye vat but it has to be stainless steel so the dye does not react to the metal.
Ive been thinking about a big 8 gal stainless cooking pot Ive got out in the garage. Too big to use on my stovetop, ( prob have to heat on the side burner of my propane grill outside) but it might be perfect for dying efforts
 
Messages
10,596
Location
vancouver, canada
Ive been thinking about a big 8 gal stainless cooking pot Ive got out in the garage. Too big to use on my stovetop, ( prob have to heat on the side burner of my propane grill outside) but it might be perfect for dying efforts
I have been using the largest enameled canning pot I could find. It is not large enough to give the felt room to stretch out. Hence I am having difficulty getting an even dye job. I am looking to buy a stainless laundry tub 20" x 18" and have the drain welded shut with a stainless plate. It will sit on my two single burner butane stoves.
 

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