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Discussion in 'Hats' started by Lefty, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. I bought my Stagecoach new in 1979-1980 timeframe. It is not wool & definitely not beaver, it is bunny fur felt & if a blend bunny with hare at best.
     
  2. kiltie

    kiltie Practically Family

    Messages:
    733
    Location:
    lone star state
    I'm in the market for a good top hat. Is it best to go nearest your off the shelf size, or size up to account for a more rigid hat, like you might do a boater?
     
  3. ManofKent

    ManofKent My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,039
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Mine's definitely Wabbit too.
     
  4. John Galt

    John Galt Vendor

    Messages:
    2,080
    Location:
    Chico
    I've not purchased a new one, but you did say a "good" one, so...

    If I were to buy a good new top hat, I'd contact Hatter4 and have him make me one the old way. I am confident Oliver will take good care of you, and it should fit like a glove...
     
  5. guitarmasta12

    guitarmasta12 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    317
    Location:
    Queensbury, NY
    Can you tell what a early 1950s Knox Twenty fedora has? Liner, logo, if it has oilskin, brim sizes, size tags, everything.
     
  6. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    From the "everything you wanted to know about hat terminology but were afraid to ask" department, can somebody please define "foxing" as it has to do with hat liners? Thanks!
     
  7. alanfgag

    alanfgag

    Messages:
    14,504
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    Wikipedia's explanation... it seems to have made it into the classic eBay descriptive items like "steampunk" that travel from listing to listing to describe just about everything under the sun. Some stains on liners come from hair products. Others from one can only begin to guess. Unworn or seldomly worn hats often have liners that are like new. Sometimes colors of fabric and printing fade. Only the hat wearer acquires age spots.
     
    rclark likes this.
  8. ManofKent

    ManofKent My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,039
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    In books the main causes of foxing appear to be iron in the cellulose or fungi acting on the celulose - both exacerbated by high humidity. If a liner has a rayon content then the same could be true...
     
  9. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    Thanks to you both for the explanation. Has anyone been successful at removing "foxing" spots from rayon liners?
     
  10. alanfgag

    alanfgag

    Messages:
    14,504
    Location:
    Buffalo, NY
    I tend to be fussy about "foxing" when bidding on vintage hats. I have never tried to clean a liner. My family swears by oxy-clean for garment stain removal.
     
  11. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    I hear ya. I normally am as well but the photos did not show it very well and its not that bad. I got the hat for very little, around thrift shop price, so I'm ok with it. I read that diluted hydrogen peroxide may work on foxing on paper, so I might try that on the liner. I'll see it as a learning opportunity!
     
  12. g.durand

    g.durand One Too Many

    Messages:
    1,881
    Location:
    Austin TX
    Careful with the concentrations of oxyclean and peroxide. I can't recommend the right solution, but I can tell you it's possible to cause fading in any logo or lettering that is on the liner.
     
  13. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    I used a solution of one part peroxide and one part distilled water, avoiding the logo and lettering where possible. Although the logo and lettering were unharmed, the foxing was only slightly improved by the process.
     
  14. fedoracentric

    fedoracentric Banned

    Messages:
    1,362
    Location:
    Streamwood, IL
    It would seem to me that "foxing" is a misapplied word, but I suppose it gives the general idea. I would think it is caused by hair treatments. I've tried to clean liners before but without a whole ton of success and, yes, you risk damaging the logo printing even trying it. I guess that is why hat sellers used to offer replacement services! They just threw them out and started fresh.
     
  15. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    In researching "foxing", I find that most websites detail foxing as to antique paper products, and define it as a microbial growth issue. At first blush, that was quite concerning to me. I don't mind the spots in limited quantities, but I'm not keen on the idea of microbes, mildew, mold, etc. next to my head! I think you are likely correct in that it is not the same type of "foxing" as occurs in antique paper products. At least I'm hoping you are correct!
     
  16. Mr.Astor

    Mr.Astor Banned

    Messages:
    246
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Alan, I use oxy-clean diluted on my straw's works great a little stiffener after your done works wonders on some old straws! I've used oxy on liners it will take out the yellow but not the hair product stain, I use a product retro-clean and a lot of sunshine. Hope this helps
     
  17. rclark

    rclark Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,254
    Location:
    Central Texas
    Good info, Mr. Astor. Thanks!
     
  18. guitarmasta12

    guitarmasta12 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    317
    Location:
    Queensbury, NY
    What's the easiest way to clean stains off the hat liner?
     
  19. I've used cold water & Woolite...in a bowl, gently agitate with fingers, let dry slowly...
     
  20. guitarmasta12

    guitarmasta12 A-List Customer

    Messages:
    317
    Location:
    Queensbury, NY
    Thanks ;)
     

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