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Discussion in 'Hats' started by Lefty, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Frunobulax

    Frunobulax

    Messages:
    14,574
    Location:
    Funkytown, USA
    Just put it in a small dish or bowl and swish it around. Rinse in cool clear water. Personally, I recommend Woolite.
     
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  2. belfastboy

    belfastboy My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,915
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    In your case I would soak it and avoid scrunching it. If you have a soft brush I would try that on the stained areas. but avoid brushing directly on the logo area. Use tepid water definitely not full on hot.
     
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  3. hbenthow

    hbenthow Familiar Face

    Messages:
    66
    Location:
    Columbia, Ms.
    Thank you.

    Thank you. I looked up Woolite, and saw that there is an extra delicate version available. That looks ideal.
     
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  4. belfastboy

    belfastboy My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,915
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    Swish....that is the word I was trying to remember! Swish not scrunch!
     
  5. pairrothead01

    pairrothead01 Familiar Face

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    I have been binge watching the TNT show "The Alienist" and have seen some hats that I would appreciate knowing what style they are.
    Therefore I ask 2 questions
    1. What is the general style differences of a Homberg and Lord's hat?

    2. What is the general style differences of a Derby and Bowler?


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  6. pairrothead01

    pairrothead01 Familiar Face

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    Pictures...[​IMG]

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  7. belfastboy

    belfastboy My Mail is Forwarded Here

    Messages:
    3,915
    Location:
    vancouver, canada
    I have a few of each of Homburgs and Lord's hats. The differences are a matter of opinion IMHO. They are very similar with the most noticeable difference is Lord's hats have the pinch whereas Homburgs usually are not pinched although you can see Homburgs with pinches as well. Secondly Homburgs have the brim binding while a true Lord's hat has the brim curl but usually not the binding. I think in general Lord's hats are more casual while Homburgs tend to be a more formal look. Although I love wearing my Homburg with a leather jacket and jeans.
     
  8. Zombie_61

    Zombie_61 I'll Lock Up

    There are none, as they're different names for the same hat. In the U.K. it's a "bowler" and in the U.S. it's a "derby".
     
    hatsRme, M Hatman, Rmccamey and 3 others like this.
  9. deadlyhandsome

    deadlyhandsome I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    8,711
    Location:
    Central California
    What the others said. To me, the lords hat is he same as a homburg but without the bound brim. That’s the only difference to me. There is a thread here on the lords hat too.

    https://www.thefedoralounge.com/threads/the-lords-hat.24991/page-3



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  10. jlee562

    jlee562 I'll Lock Up

    Messages:
    4,232
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    and to further confuse, "coke" is also used interchangeably with bowler in the UK.
     
  11. pairrothead01

    pairrothead01 Familiar Face

    Messages:
    54
    Location:
    Everett, Washington
    Thank you.....I'LL finish the season tonight....and will look more closely to those stated details.


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  12. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    Longer hair hats that I own all seem to be softer in dress hat weight, from velour on. I have a fuzzy Beaver Brand Western though, with a cattleman crease and rolled brim, which is pretty firm.
    Stiffening it must have been tricky. I have a "reverse conversion" project that I started for my wife on the back burner because she didn't like it. I had a 6 3/4 Stetson Sovereign from the 60s that I was willing to expiriment on. An alpine styled velour with a stingy underwelt brim and a rope hatband. It had a center crease and very minor side dents. I decided to make it into a small brimmed "Western", seeing it as a ladies hat. I took out the welt, ironed the brim flat to remove the flange, which didnt quite do it, so I cut a hole in a baboo cutting board, put a hat stretcher in it as a band block, ironed the heck out of it, then put a bag of powdered drywall compound that I first warmed in the oven on it overnight.
    That did the trick. But it was still a very soft hat. Even with serious steam I couldn't get it to hold the "Gus" type crease I was trying for.
    Out came the shellac. First I tried the Zinzer aerosol, but it just dried on the outer soft velour fuzziness without penetrating into the felt. I managed to work a little bit in with an alcohol soaked rag, but not enough. Velours are somewhat water repellent, and solvent repellent as well. They just don't really wick fluids into themselves very willingly, which also means very evenly, which bit me when I got serious about applying shellac out of a quart can with a sponge. I used a 50/50 shellac alcohol mix, but even that tended to stop on the outer surface of the velour. I got very uneven results.
    Desperate, I first sponged the inside of the crown with straight denatured alcohol, hoping this would eliminate the surface tension so the felt would be "thirsty" and absorb shellac. It did work, in that shellac did penetrate deeper into the hat body. Unfortunately, it still didnt do so very evenly. The hat takes a crease and looks pretty good, but if you handle the crown and squeeze it, you find some areas noticably stiffened, but others still very soft. I plan to try to even it out before I put a lining back in it.
    Maybe shellac was the wrong stiffener. Everything you see about using it includes warnings about not using too much.
    Gum Tragacanth, on the other had, is applied by working and slapping it into the felt while the hat is inside out on a block.
    I have yet to try it on anything with hair, but think you should probably try that before shellac.

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    Cotton1of2 likes this.
  13. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    I better do some of that. I tend to just rip the trimmings out, figuring I can reblock it to fit. I now have a backlog of such hats, because my acquisition and fabrication of blocks and flanges has not kept pace with my aquisition of hats in need of work.

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    M Hatman likes this.
  14. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    I've also blown out the back seam in sweats with the stretcher, which usually actually means that the old leather tears at the stitch line on one side or the other. Worse, I popped the reed out of a ferule once, then the lid wants to shrink even smaller! Live and learn. I won't do THAT again. I did that on an aluminum stretcher that enlarges the entire crown, but can't avoid also stretching out the reed area. Next time I'll stretch the band area with a wooden stretcher, then come back with the full crown one to erase the new taper.
    Kevin at JJ Hats suggests stretching at the top of the ribbon. If you have a larger grossgrain, the taper effect is visually lessened by the horizontal line.
    Condition your leather first, which will make it more flexible. If it's too far gone though, it will also soften it up for tearing.
    Go slow, and don't be afraid to leave the hat on your stretcher for a couple days between turns of the screw.

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    Randall Renshaw likes this.
  15. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    Scrunching can make the fabric separate in strips.

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  16. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    I would pull the trigger if it will fit you.
    (Oh wait, I might pull the trigger even if I knew it would never fit me.)
    Did you see more inside pictures? Leather can help nail down dating to a degree.

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  17. J Williams

    J Williams Practically Family

    Messages:
    533
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Yeah the trouble is the sellers bottom line is $600


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  18. OUCH!!!!!!!
     
  19. Hat and Rehat

    Hat and Rehat Call Me a Cab

    Messages:
    2,328
    Location:
    Denver
    Too rich for my blood.

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  20. Dr.John

    Dr.John New in Town

    Messages:
    2
    Resized_20191127_142627.jpeg I am a bit new to regularly wearing hats, but have taken a liking to the style. I have a handful that have been given to me over the years, all with a unique story behind them. My most recent acquisition was my grandfather's. He purchased it in the late 40's from Caplan's Men's store in Alexandria, La (take note of the mirror behind me). It is a cream colored Borsalino. I love the way it feels and it makes me look good. Given that it is not in my budget to buy comparable hats, can you make some recommendations for similarly styled and quality hats that is more affordable? Or where I should look to find preowned hats that may need some reconditioning?
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2019

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